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DVD & Home Theater Gear Discuss DVD and Home Theater Equipment.

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Old 02-23-01, 06:51 AM   #1
an68
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I just got a Toshiba 40H80 and immediately set the contrast to 40 from the 100 factory setting to avoid burn in (I read somewhere that 40 was the preferred level among a lot of Toshiba owners). I haven't done the calibration with Video Essentials yet (I'll do it this weekend) and I just started learning about HT, but I was wondering if 40 is low enough to prevent burn in. Please let me know. Thanks.
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Old 02-23-01, 08:01 AM   #2
danw
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The best way to find out would be to make use of that Video Essentials disc before you use the TV for anything else!
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Old 02-23-01, 04:16 PM   #3
Frank S
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Yes 40% is pretty safe for avoiding burn-in! As suggested above get Avia or VE and calibrate using either one to get best picture quality.
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Old 02-23-01, 09:50 PM   #4
1blwnsaleen
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I'm not going to tell you whether or not the 40% is sufficient enough to avoid burn in, I'm sure it is, but I can assure you that 100% is enough to get it. I learned the hard way with my Mitsubishi. I now have a very light red line at the bottom where the difference is on a 1.85 movie and a 2.35 movie. It's not enough to ruin the TV but I take my hat off to you for knowing this before it was too late like in my case.
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Old 02-26-01, 02:39 PM   #5
wago70
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How about for non W/S TV's?

For some reason, this is the one adjustment that's hard to do on my 27 in. TV - the Video Essentials "line-bend" test just doesn't seem to bend when I adjust it. Any suggestions?
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Old 02-26-01, 03:10 PM   #6
DigIt
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Re: How about for non W/S TV's?

Quote:
Originally posted by wago70
the Video Essentials "line-bend" test just doesn't seem to bend when I adjust it. Any suggestions?
This is a good sign. On a poorer TV, the line would bend significantly, maybe even always be bent. As long as you're confident in all of your other settings, don't worry about it. A lot of the tests are redundant anyhow.
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Old 02-27-01, 10:52 AM   #7
El Pollo
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Quote:
Originally posted by 1blwnsaleen
I'm not going to tell you whether or not the 40% is sufficient enough to avoid burn in, I'm sure it is, but I can assure you that 100% is enough to get it. I learned the hard way with my Mitsubishi. I now have a very light red line at the bottom where the difference is on a 1.85 movie and a 2.35 movie. It's not enough to ruin the TV but I take my hat off to you for knowing this before it was too late like in my case.
Man, this is getting ridiculous! First I hear about channel logos, now this. I feel for you, 1blwnsaleen. Personally, I don't think any level of adjustments will totally prevent burn-in because you're basically getting a moving picture in one section of the screen while a static picture in another section. Definitely reduce the contrast to AVIA/VE levels, but I think the only thing that really helps the situation save for distorting the image to fit the screen is a Roaming Picture. I think this is a feature on the Iscan Pro where a 4x3 image changes location (slightly) on the widescreen TV each time there's a new scene. It alleviates 4x3 burn-in on a 16x9 set, but the whole 1.85 vs 2.35 thing, I dunno. That just takes the cake!
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Old 02-27-01, 11:13 AM   #8
1blwnsaleen
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I agree El Pollo that no amout adjustment will completely avoid burn in but since I knocked down those contrast settings it has not appereared to get that much worse.
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Old 02-27-01, 06:58 PM   #9
Wolfchild
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1blwnsaleen, how long did you have your set (and how much did you watch movies on it) before this happened? I'm just curious to know, as I haven't heard of that many actual cases of burn-in like this and my curiousity would like a point of reference.

I have my set's contrast and brightness down to what should be safe levels but I still worry about it a little. My set spends a lot of time with letterbox bars (although there is some variety with the different aspect ratios and the 16 x 9 mode on my set).
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