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View Full Version : Sight and Sound's Top Tens


Jules Winfield
08-01-12, 05:41 PM
Sight and Sound released their lists today and I thought it would be interesting to talk about it. Do you agree? Disagree? How many of these movies have you seen?

The Critics’ Top 10
1. Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)
2. Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941)
3. Tokyo Story (Yasujiro Ozu, 1953)
4. The Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir, 1939)
5. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans (F.W. Murnau, 1927)
6. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)
7. The Searchers (John Ford, 1956)
8. Man with a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)
9. The Passion of Joan of Arc (Carl Th. Dreyer, 1927)
10. 8 ½ (Federico Fellini, 1963)

The Directors’ Top 10
1. Tokyo Story (Ozu, 1953)
2 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)
2 Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941)
4. 8 ½ (Fellini, 1963)
5. Taxi Driver (Scorsese, 1976)
6. Apocalypse Now (Coppola, 1979)
7. The Godfather (Coppola, 1972)
7. Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)
9. Mirror (Tarkovsky, 1974)
10. Bicycle Thieves (De Sica, 1948)

Both lists contain some really great films. Vertigo is arguably Hitchcock's best so nice to see it on top. I have yet to see Tokyo Story but have been interested in checking it out for some time now. I love, love Bicycle Thieves and rarely see it in top ten lists so it's cool to see that as well. So, what do you say?

bluetoast
08-01-12, 05:47 PM
Once again Make Way for Tomorrow gets the shaft in favor of Tokyo Story. No love!

Supermallet
08-01-12, 05:59 PM
I guess I should see Tokyo Story, although I cannot fathom it being better than 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Rockmjd23
08-01-12, 06:11 PM
Is this the first time that Battleship Potemkin didn't make the list?

Mondo Kane
08-01-12, 06:11 PM
My fav's in order:
2001: A Space Odyssey
Taxi Driver
The Godfather
Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans
Apocalypse Now
The Passion of Joan of Arc
Bicycle Thieves
Citizen Kane
Tokyo Story
Man with a Movie Camera (Isn't this only about a half-hour long?)
Vertigo
8 ½
The Searchers
The Rules of the Game
Mirror (Ivan's Childhood is the only Tarkovsky film I've liked so far)

PopcornTreeCt
08-01-12, 06:30 PM
Pfft... Vertigo isn't even Hitchcock's best film.

JumpCutz
08-01-12, 06:39 PM
2001? Where's The Good,The Bad and The Ugly? Those critics and directors obviously don't know what they're talking about. -wink-

Dr. Mantle
08-01-12, 06:44 PM
Holy shit. Citizen Kane was actually dethroned on both lists! And it's all the way at number three on the directors' list.

Great to see 2001 so high. I don't think it was even on the directors' list last time. Pretty sure they went with Dr. Strangelove.

I think Mirror is Tarkovsky's weakest film, but I'm glad he's on there somewhere.

I bet Coppola is having a good day. Only person with two films on the list. (And he's still above ground!)

Sondheim
08-01-12, 06:46 PM
Well, it would be pretty hard to claim that any of these aren't classics. There's nothing particularly original or unexpected here, but that's always the case with these lists that are a compilation of the lists of hundreds of different professionals.

I personally like or love every film on the list, with particular favorites being the Hitchcock, Ozu, Murnau, Tarkovsky, Vertov, Kubrick, and Renoir (so pretty much half the list would rank among my personal top 50 or so.)

I personally think they chose the best Hitchcock, and the second best Tarkovsky (the first being Andrei Rublev, which is #26 on the full list.)

Also, as much as I appreciate and enjoy Citizen Kane, it's kind of nice to see something take its place.

Here's (http://www.bfi.org.uk/news/50-greatest-films-all-time) the critics' top 50 for anyone interested.

Coral
08-01-12, 06:51 PM
Hard to argue with anything on that list really... although while I liked Vertigo, I thought it was overrated.

Finisher
08-01-12, 07:15 PM
Vertigo is Hitchcock's most visual film and directors/writers respond to the obsession theme. Personally, I'd go with Rear Window or Strangers on a Train for Hitchcock.

Andrei Rublev, Solaris and Stalker should trump The Mirror, but it's good to see Tarkovsky on the directors' list.

PopcornTreeCt
08-01-12, 07:26 PM
I like seeing Scorsese up there for Taxi Driver.

Ash Ketchum
08-01-12, 07:29 PM
THE MIRROR is the only one I haven't seen.

I'm annoyed that no Kurosawa is there. Certainly SEVEN SAMURAI could have displaced either MAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA or PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC from the first list and APOCALYPSE NOW from the second list.

Sondheim
08-01-12, 07:52 PM
The Vertov and Dreyer are great, amazing films and they should stay, but I agree that the lack of Kurosawa is unfortunate.

Finisher
08-01-12, 07:55 PM
11. Battleship Potemkin - Sergei Eisenstein, 1925 (63 votes)
12. L’Atalante - Jean Vigo, 1934 (58 votes)
13. Breathless - Jean-Luc Godard, 1960 (57 votes)
14. Apocalypse Now - Francis Ford Coppola, 1979 (53 votes)
15. Late Spring - Ozu Yasujiro, 1949 (50 votes)
16. Au hasard Balthazar - Robert Bresson, 1966 (49 votes)
17. Seven Samurai - Kurosawa Akira, 1954 (48 votes)
17. Persona - Ingmar Bergman, 1966 (48 votes)
19. Mirror - Andrei Tarkovsky, 1974 (47 votes)
20. Singin’ in the Rain - Stanley Donen & Gene Kelly, 1951 (46 votes)
21. L’avventura - Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960 (43 votes)
21. Le Mépris - Jean-Luc Godard, 1963 (43 votes)
21. The Godfather - Francis Ford Coppola, 1972 (43 votes)
24. Ordet - Carl Dreyer, 1955 (42 votes)
24. In the Mood for Love - Wong Kar-Wai, 2000 (42 votes)
26. Rashomon - Kurosawa Akira, 1950 (41 votes)
26. Andrei Rublev - Andrei Tarkovsky, 1966 (41 votes)
28. Mulholland Dr. - David Lynch, 2001 (40 votes)
29. Stalker - Andrei Tarkovsky, 1979 (39 votes)
29. Shoah - Claude Lanzmann, 1985 (39 votes)
31. The Godfather Part II - Francis Ford Coppola, 1974 (38 votes)
31. Taxi Driver - Martin Scorsese, 1976 (38 votes)
33. Bicycle Thieves - Vittoria De Sica, 1948 (37 votes)
34. The General - Buster Keaton & Clyde Bruckman, 1926 (35 votes)
35. Metropolis - Fritz Lang, 1927 (34 votes)
35. Psycho - Alfred Hitchcock, 1960 (34 votes)
35. Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles - Chantal Akerman, 1975 (34 votes)
35. Sátántangó - Béla Tarr, 1994 (34 votes)
39. The 400 Blows - François Truffaut, 1959 (33 votes)
39. La dolce vita - Federico Fellini, 1960 (33 votes)
41. Journey to Italy - Roberto Rossellini, 1954 (32 votes)
42. Pather Panchali - Satyajit Ray, 1955 (31 votes)
42. Some Like It Hot - Billy Wilder, 1959 (31 votes)
42. Gertrud - Carl Dreyer, 1964 (31 votes)
42. Pierrot le fou - Jean-Luc Godard, 1965 (31 votes)
42. Play Time - Jacques Tati, 1967 (31 votes)
42. Close-Up - Abbas Kiarostami, 1990 (31 votes)
48. The Battle of Algiers - Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966 (30 votes)
48. Histoire(s) du cinéma - Jean-Luc Godard, 1998 (30 votes)
50. City Lights - Charlie Chaplin, 1931 (29 votes)
50. Ugetsu monogatari - Mizoguchi Kenji, 1953 (29 votes)
50. La Jetée - Chris Marker, 1962 (29 votes)

GoldenJCJ
08-01-12, 08:14 PM
No Fight Club, no The Matrix? What the hell kind of "best of..." list is this?! No Dark Knight?!? Fuck this list!!!1!!!!1!!

Autotelik
08-01-12, 08:22 PM
I don't remember the list from 2002, but might go hunting in my garage to dig it out. Only 2 movies since yr 2000 to make the top 50: In The Mood For Love, and Mulholland Drive.

inri222
08-01-12, 09:45 PM
- IMO Vertigo, 8 1/2 & 2001 are the best films by their respective directors and are all great choices.

- Good to see something by one of the greatest directors of the last 30 years : Béla Tarr's Sátántangó at 35.

- I would have put these 3 in the top 10 : Au hasard Balthazar - Robert Bresson / L’avventura - Michelangelo Antonioni / Stalker - Andrei Tarkovsky

But which ones would I have removed? It is very difficult when you have so many great choices.

MoviePage
08-01-12, 09:55 PM
I've seen all the films from both lists except Man with a Movie Camera. I'm not a big fan of trying to rank art, but it seems like a pretty good list of titles to me. I will say that I'm very pleased to see The Passion of Joan of Arc on there, as it is one of my all-time favorites.

Giles
08-01-12, 10:52 PM
guess I should see:

Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans
Man with a Movie Camera

no 'City of God' - tsk tsk...

Boba Fett
08-01-12, 11:07 PM
The inclusion of "The Searchers" on that list makes me instantly tune it out: a beautifully shot film marred by one of the worst actors to grace the big screen.

Rypro 525
08-01-12, 11:31 PM
i actually didn't realize until today how big and prestigious this list was. I figured it was a normal list or a regular internet site list

Mondo Kane
08-01-12, 11:57 PM
i actually didn't realize until today how big and prestigious this list was. I figured it was a normal list or a regular internet site list

What might be even more shocking is that a lot of of those films are also listed in Entertainment Weekly's 100!
http://www.filmsite.org/ew100.html

JumpCutz
08-02-12, 12:12 AM
What might be even more shocking is that a lot of of those films are also listed in Entertainment Weekly's 100!
http://www.filmsite.org/ew100.html

That list. Some great choices, but ....the following rankings are ridiculous. :lol:

16) Star Wars
20) E.T.
46) Aliens
67) Airplane!
75) Tootsie

Astrofan
08-02-12, 12:15 AM
One could quibble, but the lists are fine. Vertigo is not only Hitchcock's best movie, but it is a true work of art. However Citizen Kane is still the best movie ever made and needs to be at the top. Taxi Driver has some real problems--Goodfellas is Scorsese's best movie. I cannot see listing anything by Coppola in a top ten, but I could see The Conversation on a top 50 list. I know the world always puts 8 1/2 at the top, but for me it's La Dolce Vita.

The missing shockers--The Seventh Seal and The Seven Samurai.

Boba Fett
08-02-12, 01:22 AM
*cough*NOLAWRENCEOFARABIA*cough*

The Antipodean
08-02-12, 02:44 AM
I've seen The Critics’ Top 10
2001, Vertigo, Citizen Kane, Rules of the Game... which is pretty poor average really. I keep meaning to see Tokyo Story and Sunrise

Jaymole
08-02-12, 07:25 AM
The Critics’ Top 10
1. Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)
2. Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941)
3. Tokyo Story (Yasujiro Ozu, 1953)
4. The Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir, 1939)
5. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans (F.W. Murnau, 1927)
6. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)
7. The Searchers (John Ford, 1956)
8. Man with a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)
9. The Passion of Joan of Arc (Carl Th. Dreyer, 1927)
10. 8 ½ (Federico Fellini, 1963)



Amazing, my top 10 is almost exactly the same in titles and ranking...the only difference being replace Vertigo and The Searchers with Armageddon and The Waterboy.

foofighters7
08-02-12, 08:34 AM
I've seen most of the films on the list and although I'm a huge Hitchcock fan I don't see Vertigo being at the top. I would put Psycho there before Vertigo.

Having said that, it's hard to list these best films of all time. You're dealing with Great Vs Great Vs Great. Shoot, I think 25 or more of those films could be considered the best of all time and no one would scoff at it.

Tokyo Story is a fantastic film, but I certainly wouldn't put it that high.

IMO 2001 will keep creeping up this list and somewhere in the future it will be #1. It's the newest film in the top 10 as far as when it was made so I think it's just a matter of time.

RocShemp
08-02-12, 08:51 AM
Of those lists, I've only seen the following:

The Searchers (John Ford, 1956)
2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)
Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941)
Apocalypse Now (Coppola, 1979)
The Godfather (Coppola, 1972)
Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)

kefrank
08-02-12, 09:28 AM
While I understand why Citizen Kane is often considered the best film of all time, I've never personally been able to connect with it so I don't mind seeing it dethroned. And Vertigo is probably my personal #1, so seeing it at the top warms my heart. At the risk of sounding like a pretentious d-bag, there's just something transcendent about that film that sets it apart for me.

Let's be serious though. When you're at the level of top 10 films of all time, they're all pretty interchangeable.

I still need to see Tokyo Story, The Rules of the Game, and Man with a Movie Camera.

Hokeyboy
08-02-12, 09:28 AM
TOKYO STORY is a fantastic movie, but I don't think it's Ozu's best. I prefer AN AUTUMN AFTERNOON or FLOATING WEEDS.

Anyway, it took me a long time to love VERTIGO. As a kid I always felt it was kind of boring, but I was expecting another NORTH BY NORTHWEST or ROPE or something. Stupid me. Love it now. Is it better than CITIZEN KANE? Both films are holy, but neither are in my personal Top 10. Out of the Critics List, my Top 10 would include The Godfather, Taxi Driver, and 2001.

inri222
08-02-12, 09:33 AM
One could quibble, but the lists are fine. Vertigo is not only Hitchcock's best movie, but it is a true work of art.

Agree
Vertigo is an amazing film in every aspect.
Closely followed by Psycho & Rear Window.

However Citizen Kane is still the best movie ever made and needs to be at the top.

Disagree
Even though I love Kane I would not consider it the single greatest movie ever made.
Then again I could not choose 1 single greatest movie ever made

Taxi Driver has some real problems--Goodfellas is Scorsese's best movie.

Disagree
IMO Scorsese greatest films are a tie between Taxi Driver & Raging Bull

I cannot see listing anything by Coppola in a top ten, but I could see The Conversation on a top 50 list.

Agree
The Godfather I & II, Apocalypse Now and The Conversation are all amazing films, but I would not include them in my own personal top 10.

I know the world always puts 8 1/2 at the top, but for me it's La Dolce Vita.

Disagree
I love La Dolce Vita but I love 8 1/2 just a tiny bit more.

The missing shockers--The Seventh Seal and The Seven Samurai.

Agree
Love them both, even though IMO they are not Bergman's & Kurosawa's best films.

wendersfan
08-02-12, 10:25 AM
I prefer Late Spring to Tokyo Story. It's nice to see Satantango get a little bit of love.

Dr Mabuse
08-02-12, 10:32 AM
I'm surprised Mizoguchi's 'Ugetsu' didn't beat some of those in the top ten. That's one of the best films ever made.

They are nice lists, but some notable films are missing considering what made the top ten.

cleaver
08-02-12, 10:52 AM
I don't understand how these guys wake up one day and decide they like Vertigo better than Citizen Kane. I mean on my personal list, it's like man I enjoyed Inception, I'm putting that where. But your #1 all timer, not a lot of movement there.

inri222
08-02-12, 11:18 AM
I'm surprised Mizoguchi's 'Ugetsu' didn't beat some of those in the top ten. That's one of the best films ever made.

:thumbsup:

It's nice to see Satantango get a little bit of love.

:thumbsup:

wendersfan
08-02-12, 11:23 AM
I don't understand how these guys wake up one day and decide they like Vertigo better than Citizen Kane. I mean on my personal list, it's like man I enjoyed Inception, I'm putting that where. But your #1 all timer, not a lot of movement there. It's not always the same list of critics polled every decade. My understanding is that there was a much larger number polled this time than ever before. As older critics die or retire, more contemporary viewpoints become represented.
Look at the individual lists. It's not like everybody just swapped Vertigo for Citizen Kane at the top of their lists. Even the most highly ranked films appear on a comparatively small number of lists. So, while there's some consensus, there's not really a lot of it, if you get my meaning.

zekeburger1979
08-02-12, 12:29 PM
*cough*NOLAWRENCEOFARABIA*cough*

It's 81st. Quite a fall from 4th in 2002.

Here's the previous polls:

Critics' Poll: 2002

1. "Citizen Kane" (Orson Welles, 1941)

2. "Vertigo" (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)

3. "La Règle du jeu" (Jean Renoir, 1939)

4. "The Godfather" and "The Godfather Part II" (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972 and 1974)

5. "Tokyo Story" (Yasujiro Ozu, 1953)

6. "2001: A Space Odyssey" (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)

=7. "Battleship Potemkin" (Sergei Eisenstein, 1925)

=7. "Sunrise: A Song for Two Humans" (F.W. Murnau, 1927)

9. "8½" (Federico Fellini, 1963)

10. "Singin' in the Rain" (Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly, 1952)



Directors' Poll: 2002

1. "Citizen Kane" (Orson Welles, 1941)

2. "The Godfather" and "The Godfather Part II" (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972 and 1974)

3. "8½" (Federico Fellini, 1963)

4. "Lawrence of Arabia" (David Lean, 1962)

5. "Dr. Strangelove" (Stanley Kubrick, 1964)

=6. "Bicycle Thieves" (Vittorio De Sica, 1948)

=6. "Raging Bull" (Martin Scorsese, 1980)

=6. "Vertigo" (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)

=9. "Rashomon" (Akira Kurosawa, 1950)

=9. "La Règle du jeu" (Jean Renoir, 1939)

=9. "Seven Samurai" (Akira Kurosawa, 1954)



Critics' Poll: 1992

1. "Citizen Kane" (Orson Welles, 1941)

2. "La Règle du jeu" (Jean Renoir, 1939)

3. "Tokyo Story" (Yasujiro Ozu, 1953)

4. "Vertigo" (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)

5. "The Searchers" (John Ford, 1956)

=6. "L'Atalante" (Jean Vigo, 1934)

=6. "Battleship Potemkin" (Sergei Eisenstein, 1925)

=6. "The Passion of Joan of Arc" (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1927)

=6. "Pather Panchali" (Satyajit Ray, 1955)

10. "2001: A Space Odyssey" (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)



Directors' Poll: 1992

1. "Citizen Kane" (Orson Welles, 1941)

=2. "8½" (Federico Fellini, 1963)

=2. "Raging Bull" (Martin Scorsese, 1980)

4. "La strada" (Federico Fellini, 1954)

5. "L'Atalante" (Jean Vigo, 1934)

=6. "The Godfather" (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972)

=6. "Modern Times" (Charlie Chaplin, 1936)

=6. "Vertigo" (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)

=9. "The Godfather Part II" (Francis Ford Coppola, 1974)

=9. "The Passion of Joan of Arc" (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1927)

=9. "Rashomon" (Akira Kurosawa, 1950)

=9. "Seven Samurai" (Akira Kurosawa, 1954)



1982 poll

1. "Citizen Kane" (Orson Welles, 1941)

2. "La Règle du jeu" (Jean Renoir, 1939)

=3. "Seven Samurai" (Akira Kurosawa, 1954)

=3. "Singin' in the Rain" (Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly, 1952)

5. "8½" (Federico Fellini, 1963)

6. "Battleship Potemkin" (Sergei Eisenstein, 1925)

=7. "L'avventura" (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960)

=7. "The Magnificent Ambersons" (Orson Welles, 1942)

=7. "Vertigo" (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)

=9. "The General" (Buster Keaton, 1926)

=9. "The Searchers" (John Ford, 1956)



1972 poll

1. "Citizen Kane" (Orson Welles, 1941)

2. "La Règle du jeu" (Jean Renoir, 1939)

3. "Battleship Potemkin" (Sergei Eisenstein, 1925)

4. "8½" (Federico Fellini, 1963)

=5. "L'avventura" (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960)

=5. "Persona" (Ingmar Bergman, 1968)

7. "The Passion of Joan of Arc" (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1927)

=8. "The General" (Buster Keaton, 1926)

=8. "The Magnificent Ambersons" (Orson Welles, 1942)

=10. "Ugetsu Monogatari" (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1953)

=10. "Wild Strawberries" (Ingmar Bergman, 1957)



1962 poll

1. "Citizen Kane" (Orson Welles, 1941)

2. "L'avventura" (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960)

3. "La Règle du jeu" (Jean Renoir, 1939)

=4. "Greed" (Erich von Stroheim, 1924)

=4. "Ugetsu Monogatari" (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1953)

=6. "Battleship Potemkin" (Sergei Eisenstein, 1925)

=6. "Bicycle Thieves" (Vittorio De Sica, 1948)

=6. "Ivan the Terrible" (Sergei Eisenstein, 1944)

9. "La terra trema" (Luchino Visconti, 1948)

10. "L'Atalante" (Jean Vigo, 1934)



1952 poll

1. "Bicycle Thieves" (Vittorio De Sica, 1948)

=2. "City Lights" (Charlie Chaplin, 1931)

=2. "The Gold Rush" (Charlie Chaplin, 1925)

4. "Battleship Potemkin" (Sergei Eisenstein, 1925)

=5. "Intolerance" (D.W. Griffith, 1916)

=5. "Louisiana Story" (Robert Flaherty, 1948)

=7. "Greed" (Erich von Stroheim, 1924)

=7. "Le Jour se leve" (Marcel Carne, 1939)

=7. "The Passion of Joan of Arc" (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1927)

=10. "Brief Encounter" (David Lean, 1946)

=10. "Le Million" (Rene Clair, 1931)

=10. "La Règle du jeu" (Jean Renoir, 1939)

MoviePage
08-02-12, 03:43 PM
I'm surprised Mizoguchi's 'Ugetsu' didn't beat some of those in the top ten. That's one of the best films ever made.

Ugetsu is phenomenal, but I don't know if I've ever seen it in the top 10 of any critic's (or critics') list.

Gunde
08-02-12, 04:10 PM
It's preposterous to claim that nothing made in the last 44 years is among the 10 best films ever.

But what the hell do I know. I've only seen 3 of the 10. 2 of them I love, 1 I hated.

Mabuse
08-02-12, 04:16 PM
I think it's good that they rectified whatever was the problem in 2002 when the Gofather I and II were lumped together and a vote for either film counted as one and shot the films way up the list. That was rediculous.

PopcornTreeCt
08-02-12, 06:06 PM
Goodfellas :lol:

wendersfan
08-02-12, 06:45 PM
Ugetsu is phenomenal, but I don't know if I've ever seen it in the top 10 of any critic's (or critics') list.

Look one post above yours. It placed in the top ten in both 1962 and 1972.

MoviePage
08-03-12, 03:54 AM
Look one post above yours. It placed in the top ten in both 1962 and 1972.

I was referring more to contemporary views, but thanks for pointing that out because I didn't notice it there either.

wendersfan
08-03-12, 08:50 AM
I was referring more to contemporary views, but thanks for pointing that out because I didn't notice it there either.

Ugetsu got 29 votes total, but we won't know the details for a couple of weeks.

http://www.bfi.org.uk/news/50-greatest-films-all-time

Hokeyboy
08-03-12, 09:04 AM
For my money, I'd put Altman's NASHVILLE above Ford's THE SEARCHERS. Heck, that's not even my favorite John Ford movie. I still love it to death, but better than STAGECOACH, MY DARLING CLEMENTINE, THE GRAPES OF WRATH or THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE? Well, maybe. It just seems to be the "go-to" Ford film. What do I know? I'm just a cavemablllffffftttt

CharlieK
08-03-12, 09:16 AM
Here are some individual Top 10s that had some surprising recent, mainstream titles you don't normally see on these kinds of lists. These lists have more comedies on them which are almost always given the shaft on these kinds of lists. As the old guard starts to die off, I think the younger directors will start giving comedies their due.

Sean Durkin (director, Martha Marcy May Marlene)
"The Shining" (1980, dir. Stanley Kubrick)
"Rosemary's Baby" (1968, dir. Roman Polanski)
"Jaws" (1975, dir. Steven Spielberg)
"3 Women" (1977, dir. Robert Altman)
"The Birds" (1963, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)
"The Goonies" (1985, dir. Richard Donner)
"The Piano Teacher" (2001, dir. Michael Haneke)
"Persona" (1966, dir. Ingmar Bergman)
"The Panic In Needle Park" (1971, dir. Jerry Schatzberg)
"The Conformist" (1970, dir. Bernardo Bertolucci)


Michael Mann
"Apocalypse Now" (1979, dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
"Battleship Potemkin" (1925, dir. Sergei Eisenstein)
"Citizen Kane" (1941, dir. Orson Welles)
"Avatar" (2009, dir. James Cameron)
"Dr. Strangelove" (1964, dir. Stanley Kubrick)
"Biutiful" (2010, dir. Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu)
"My Darling Clementine" (1946, dir. John Ford)
"The Passion Of Joan Of Arc" (1928, dir. Carl Theodor Dreyer)
"Raging Bull" (1980, dir. Martin Scorsese)
"The Wild Bunch" (1969, dir. Sam Peckinpah)


David O. Russell
"It's A Wonderful Life" (1946, dir. Frank Capra)
"Chinatown" (1974, dir. Roman Polanski)
"Goodfellas" (1990, dir. Martin Scorsese)
"Vertigo" (1958, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)
"Pulp Fiction" (1994, dir. Quentin Tarantino)
"Raging Bull" (1980, dir. Martin Scorsese)
"Young Frankenstein" (1974, dir. Mel Brooks)
"The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie" (1972, dir. Luis Bunuel)
"The Godfather" (1972, dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
"Blue Velvet" (1986, dir. David Lynch)
"Groundhog Day" (1993, dir. Harold Ramis)


Quentin Tarantino
"The Good, The Bad & The Ugly" (1966, dir. Sergio Leone)
"Apocalypse Now" (1979, dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
"The Bad News Bears" (1976, dir. Michael Ritchie)
"Carrie" (1976, dir. Brian DePalma)
"Dazed And Confused" (1993, dir. Richard Linklater)
"The Great Escape" (1963, dir. John Sturges)
"His Girl Friday" (1940, dir. Howard Hawks)
"Jaws" (1975, dir. Steven Spielberg)
"Pretty Maids All In A Row (1971, dir. Roger Vadim)
"Rolling Thunder" (1977, dir. John Flynn)
"Sorcerer" (1977, dir. William Friedkin)
"Taxi Driver" (1976, dir. Martin Scorsese)


Edgar Wright
"2001: A Space Odyssey" (1968, dir. Stanley Kubrick)
"An American Werewolf In London" (1981, dir. John Landis)
"Carrie" (1976, dir. Brian DePalma)
"Dames" (1934, dir. Ray Enright & Busby Berkeley)
"Don't Look Now" (1973, dir. Nicolas Roeg)
"Duck Soup" (1933, dir. Leo McCarey)
"Psycho" (1960, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)
"Raising Arizona" (1987, dir. The Coen Brothers)
"Taxi Driver" (1976, dir. Martin Scorsese)
"The Wild Bunch" (1969, dir. Sam Peckinpah)


More here (http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/read-new-all-time-top-10s-from-martin-scorsese-woody-allen-francis-ford-coppola-quentin-tarantino-more-20120803?page=1#blogPostHeaderPanel).

wendersfan
08-03-12, 09:19 AM
Directors lists are inevitably more mainstream than critics.

CharlieK
08-03-12, 09:28 AM
Inevitably. Fucking critics, man. Why they got to be so stuffy?

inri222
08-03-12, 09:38 AM
Here are some individual Top 10s that had some surprising recent, mainstream titles you don't normally see on these kinds of lists. These lists have more comedies on them which are almost always given the shaft on these kinds of lists. As the old guard starts to die off, I think the younger directors will start giving comedies their due.


IMO some of those lists are guilty of cronyism.

Lemdog
08-03-12, 11:37 AM
I guess I should see Tokyo Story, although I cannot fathom it being better than 2001: A Space Odyssey.

I can't watch Tokyo Story anymore. I cry like a little girl every time i do. I still think Barry Lyndon is better than 2001 and North by Northwest is better than Vertigo. In the Mood for Love should be in the top ten.

Hokeyboy
08-03-12, 12:38 PM
IMO some of those lists are guilty of cronyism.
Well if that's the truth, then some of those cronies are guilty of criticism.

Tokyo Story is magnificent but nothing in that movie feels like the powerful slam to the scrotilia like that final shot in An Autumn Afternoon. Christ. I feel weak just thinking about it. I wet 'em.

Mabuse
08-03-12, 12:57 PM
IMO some of those lists are guilty of cronyism.

I don't see any glaring examples. Maybe Tarantino including Dazed and Confused.

CloverClover
08-03-12, 10:55 PM
Goodfellas is Scorsese's best movie.

I agree, it is the most iconic and groundbreaking one. I think people take it for granted, maybe when it ages 30-40 years the collective will finally begin to see it is worthy of being in the top 10

Jules Winfield
08-05-12, 02:25 PM
I agree, it is the most iconic and groundbreaking one. I think people take it for granted, maybe when it ages 30-40 years the collective will finally begin to see it is worthy of being in the top 10
I actually think some of that taking it for granted stems from the cussing and violence. A film has to be classy and not have so many fucks to be considered on a list of such prestige and whatnot is what i imagine to be the line of thinking.

inri222
08-05-12, 06:02 PM
I actually think some of that taking it for granted stems from the cussing and violence. A film has to be classy and not have so many fucks to be considered on a list of such prestige and whatnot is what i imagine to be the line of thinking.

I don't think Taxi Driver is what one considers "classy"
Travis takes Betsy to a porn film and you see an on screen gang bang.
Jodie Foster plays a 12 year old prostitute.
Blacks are not portrayed in a very positive light in this film.
DeNiro calls his black clients "spooks".
Scorsese says that his woman is fooling around with a "**********" and he is gonna stick a .44 Magnum in her pussy.

If you take away the "artsiness" of Scorsese's masterful direction (very Godardian) you would end up with a full fledged exploitation flick.

Mabuse
08-06-12, 11:23 AM
Come on! Every night he has to wipe the cum out of the back of the cab. That's classy. It's called "romance". Get a clue.

Jules Winfield
08-06-12, 12:02 PM
I don't think Taxi Driver is what one considers "classy"
Travis takes Betsy to a porn film and you see an on screen gang bang.
Jodie Foster plays a 12 year old prostitute.
Blacks are not portrayed in a very positive light in this film.
DeNiro calls his black clients "spooks".
Scorsese says that his woman is fooling around with a "**********" and he is gonna stick a .44 Magnum in her pussy.

If you take away the "artsiness" of Scorsese's masterful direction (very Godardian) you would end up with a full fledged exploitation flick.

Same goes for Taxi Driver. I was just bringing up Goodfellas. Taxi Driver only ended up being on the Director's list. The Critics are "stuffier".

inri222
08-06-12, 01:23 PM
Antonioni's L'avventura just 2 years after it was made came in second place in the 1962 poll.
From what I see it the shortest time for a film to make it to the list.


1962 poll

1. "Citizen Kane" (Orson Welles, 1941)

2. "L'avventura" (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960)

3. "La Règle du jeu" (Jean Renoir, 1939)

=4. "Greed" (Erich von Stroheim, 1924)

=4. "Ugetsu Monogatari" (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1953)

=6. "Battleship Potemkin" (Sergei Eisenstein, 1925)

=6. "Bicycle Thieves" (Vittorio De Sica, 1948)

=6. "Ivan the Terrible" (Sergei Eisenstein, 1944)

9. "La terra trema" (Luchino Visconti, 1948)

10. "L'Atalante" (Jean Vigo, 1934)