DVD Talk
Has Anyone Heard of Tugg.com ? [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum
 
Best Sellers
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
The Longest Day
Buy: $54.99 $24.99
9.
10.
DVD Blowouts
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Alien [Blu-ray]
Buy: $19.99 $9.99
8.
9.
10.

PDA
DVD Reviews

View Full Version : Has Anyone Heard of Tugg.com ?


dhmac
05-25-12, 06:21 PM
Due to a recent local event, I found out about Tugg.com (http://www.tugg.com/). But it seems like a very good idea: create a movie event with Tugg to see a particular film on the big screen on a certain night at a local theater and, if enough people RSVP and buy tickets (not sure what the threshold is), the movie event happens.

Has anyone else heard of this?

Solid Snake
05-25-12, 06:23 PM
No.

Groucho
05-25-12, 06:27 PM
Not what I hoped it would be? :sad:

dhmac
05-25-12, 06:47 PM
If you click the "Titles" link on the upper right surrounded by green, you can see which films are available.

islandclaws
05-25-12, 07:09 PM
Lots to choose from - almost too many. And what theaters would agree to doing this? Outside of local indie chains, probably not many. I don't see Regal giving up a screen so 34 people can see "2012" again.

dhmac
05-25-12, 07:25 PM
The local Tugg event was at an AMC 14-screen multiplex theater that gave up one screen for a couple of hours on an Monday night (i.e. a slow night) for showing Dr. Strangelove.

I'm thinking the RSVP threshold is 50. (Nearly 100 showed up for Dr. Strangelove.)

islandclaws
05-25-12, 07:30 PM
Hmmmm... that's actually pretty cool, but I can only see this working well in bigger cities. Even in OC it would be tough to get something going.

dsa_shea
05-26-12, 01:22 AM
Sounds like a jerkoff site.

TomOpus
05-26-12, 11:32 AM
Would be nice to be able to look at which cities have which events without registering.

dhmac
05-26-12, 01:25 PM
Would be nice to be able to look at which cities have which events without registering.
Scrolling down on their main page should show some events that have been scheduled (although not necessarily your own city).

(Right now, I see a few that people like Harry Knowles have scheduled in Austin.)

Edit: And I see this one for Atlanta - http://www.tugg.com/events/658?#.T8ESS9VSTng

Trevor
05-26-12, 01:54 PM
Would be nice to be able to look at which cities have which events without registering.

They don't make it easy to find events. I can see 3 featured events on the "events" page but can't find anything else.

majorjoe23
05-26-12, 01:56 PM
Sounds like a jerkoff site.

You're thinking of jellytugs.com.

dhmac
06-16-12, 12:28 AM
The latest Tugg alerts for potential screenings in my city (Atlanta) if they reach their RSVP requirement...

The Loved Ones (on June 27th)

Yojimbo (on July 19th)


(I think the first one will not happen, but the second one will probably reach its required RSVP number and happen)

DonnachaOne
06-16-12, 12:52 AM
AMC's been very receptive to the Tugg screenings, which is good. I've seen a lot less activity about Tugg screenings lately, however. Hopefully that's just because of the demands of summer on movie theatres; I wonder do people think Tugg was a nifty idea for a while and never caught onto it in large enough numbers.

AnonomusBob15
06-17-12, 12:57 AM
the fuck took them so long to come up with this? They stopped releasing good movies on a regular basis nearly 15 years ago. It boggles my mind that they are so many films ripe for massive public viewing and we get shit to choose from. I don't go to the movies anymore because there is nothing I want to see, and when something does eventually come out from a quality filmmaker, i'm so apprehensive about traveling to see it. I saw less than five films in theaters last year and at least two were mandatory attendence for me due to being stuck with a large group of friends.


I remember when Little Children first came out. I had nowhere to see it, no access to a film available to the public while shit like Tokyo Drift, The Lake House, and Basic Instinct opened to fucking 2,000+ screens. During my search looking for a driving distance theater, I stumbled upon my first DVD Screener torrent. It was a moment in my life I will never forget. It was as if I had discovered fire, but I had to steal it because no one would sell to me. I've never really had a conscience about things like that, since I rationalize it in my head to justify my actions. I do adhere to the proper way of appreciating one's hard work when the means are at my disposal.

Why isn't Halloween (1978) re-released EVERY Halloween? WHY? They could play that, The Shining, Blair Witch, Carrie, Psycho and so many other classics during the appropriate season and make a killing. No need for massive advertising, the film is already made, and the word of mouth has been spreading on moat given classics for the last quarter century. So why not? Conspiracy is the only logical word that springs to mind.


Sometimes I wish there was a God, and this God would make it his first gift to mankind to release classic films on a large enough scale to satisfy the people who aren't fortunate enough to live in SLC, Seattle, LA, NYC, or Toronto. It pisses me off because they already live in a fucking cool city. They should have other shit to do.


:)

DonnachaOne
06-17-12, 03:13 AM
Why isn't Halloween (1978) re-released EVERY Halloween? WHY? They could play that, The Shining, Blair Witch, Carrie, Psycho and so many other classics during the appropriate season and make a killing. No need for massive advertising, the film is already made, and the word of mouth has been spreading on moat given classics for the last quarter century. So why not? Conspiracy is the only logical word that springs to mind.No, that's reality. You are not the general public, you're a big fan of movies. You'd come and see Halloween on the big screen. Hundreds of us would. But the company distributing it would need many more than us to make it a profitable exercise.

Last year Sony re-released Ghostbusters, screening it several times coming up to Halloween. The first screening I had of it did well enough for a weekday, forty or so people. Every subsequent show, however, had less and less. Other theatres, mainly the ones in the cities, had more of course, but most places I talked to wondered how we ever got forty people with the terrible attendance their shows had. With the cost of marketing the re-release I wonder if Sony were happy with the reception.

There's also the problem with carving out screens for these releases. Disney would re-release The Nightmare Before Christmas 3D around Halloween and WB would re-release he Polar Express around Christmas. Neither of them do that anymore, at least not with the same volume or frequency; they'd rather theatres use those screens to show whatever new movie they're pushing.

The general public comes to theatres to see new movies. If it's on home video, they stay home and watch it there. Discount the tickets to matinee price? "Pssh, I can buy the DVD for the cost of two tickets." Discount the tickets to three, four bucks, to the point that I'm not making any profit at all? "Pssh, that's still three or four Redbox rentals. Don't make me laugh."

It sucks for me, because I'm a movie fan, and the general public just don't care as much. The last two theatres I've worked at I've tried to organize a Cult Night. One night a week where cool older/less-seen flicks get the chance to shine, allowing an audience to build on the reliability of a regular schedule so they can see flicks on the cinema screen, because that's where movies BELONG. I just get weird looks. I look at what other theatres in similar towns that try the same thing. The programs always fail due to lack of interest from the public. That 35mm print of Terminator 2 you found plays to four customers, two of which leave because they thought they were watching a "new" movie and not getting "ripped off" with an old one. The only places that make it work are in big cities or rich areas. It sucks, because I don't live in a big city, and I'm not rich. Even trumpeted re-releases have uphill struggles these days. They just released Jaws in theatres again in the UK and Ireland. My friend saw it in Dublin on a Saturday afternoon. He was the only one there.

So Bob, it's not a conspiracy. It's simple apathy. The general public don't care about movies unless they're new movies. Fans care about the classic ones, fans care about the underloved ones, fans keep places like the New Beverly and the Angelika and Doc Films going. For now. If you can think of a way to convince idiot teenagers with disposable income - the prime audience of most movies released for the mass market - or families looking for means to shut kids up for two hours, who will then buy the toys and bookbags, to see a re-release of Spirited Away, I'm all ears.

AnonomusBob15
06-17-12, 04:18 AM
so there is no hope?


you didn't have to say it so elegantly. I'm not even furious, I feel nothing. Sometimes I wish I had been the kid that played basketball and didn't walk the mile during PE in high school. These were much better times for movies, and as you so clearly explained it's fucking hopeless. So now i'm looking at roughly 6-8 movies annually that i'll enjoy. I'm going to go write my book now.

DonnachaOne
06-17-12, 04:41 AM
There is always hope. This business is in such flux now, who knows what the next ten years will bring? As it stands I worry that it's becoming Broadway. Rich people plunking down $150 to see one of the six big shows where the performers are paid shit and if it doesn't make money, it's off the stage within a week.

But things change. In the sixties you had different venues and outlets for different types of films. Studios would put out big fat productions that they'd tour city by city, promoting them like huge events, even if they were soulless and flabby. We're seeing that now, only instead of a big tour, it's all first weekend. The answer to the sixties was the seventies - studios took changes on riskier filmmakers and found gold in thought-provoking flicks, and saw that when you gave original voices big productions they could create something fantastic. We're seeing a little of that now, every now an again.

It'll take something pretty amazing to get the good drama back into theatres, though. Right now all the good drama is on TV. Any apologist thoughts I had for Prometheus were undone by the sheer storytelling quality of the episode of Mad Men I watched after. They still make quality dramas for theatres, of course. They play on seven or eight screens nationwide throughout the year. Some of them have big enough stars that they can sell an awards campaign for them around Christmas.

At any rate, I'm curious to see what that change will be. It can't go on like this.

Go write the book. I'll read it. Books will still be around for a couple years.