DVD Talk
Is the Tree of Life one of the ten best films ever made like Ebert says? [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum
 
Best Sellers
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
The Longest Day
Buy: $54.99 $24.99
9.
10.
DVD Blowouts
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Alien [Blu-ray]
Buy: $19.99 $9.99
8.
9.
10.

PDA
DVD Reviews

View Full Version : Is the Tree of Life one of the ten best films ever made like Ebert says?


CloverClover
05-04-12, 02:20 PM
Do you agree with Ebert, that The Tree of Life is up there? Here is his full list for Sight & Sound 2012 (will be awesome to see all the other critics/filmmakers lists this year)

Aguirre, Wrath of God (Herzog)
Apocalypse Now (Coppola)
Citizen Kane (Welles)
La Dolce Vita (Fellini)
The General (Keaton)
Raging Bull (Scorsese)
2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick)
Tokyo Story (Ozu)
The Tree of Life (Malick)
Vertigo (Hitchcock)

To me it seemed that The Tree of Life was made to appear on lists like this. It is a bit safe and simplistic, it's just mainstream film is so stale and undaring that the first unusual thing that comes across will get hailed.

Mike86
05-04-12, 02:23 PM
:lol: Hell no. It wasn't a bad film but to put it on a top ten list included with some of the finest films of all time is fucking ridiculous.

musick
05-04-12, 02:28 PM
I'd put Tree Of Life on the list (with a ten in it) of one of the films I watched where it was painful to get through the first 10 minutes

ps. the 10 minutes that followed weren't much better

BambooLounge
05-04-12, 02:30 PM
I don't know if I'd put any film made in the 21st century on a top 10 of all-time list, but if I did, I'd prob opt for There Will Be Blood over anything else.

Dr Mabuse
05-04-12, 02:33 PM
Yes.

It's fine being on that list, it belongs in such company.

Jules Winfield
05-04-12, 02:47 PM
Do you agree with Ebert, that The Tree of Life is up there? Here is his full list for Sight & Sound 2012 (will be awesome to see all the other critics/filmmakers lists this year)

Aguirre, Wrath of God (Herzog)
Apocalypse Now (Coppola)
Citizen Kane (Welles)
La Dolce Vita (Fellini)
The General (Keaton)
Raging Bull (Scorsese)
2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick)
Tokyo Story (Ozu)
The Tree of Life (Malick)
Vertigo (Hitchcock)

To me it seemed that The Tree of Life was made to appear on lists like this. It is a bit safe and simplistic, it's just mainstream film is so stale and undaring that the first unusual thing that comes across will get hailed.

I've never see anyone describe Tree of Life as safe and simplistic. You must be smarter than a computer.

P.S.-Doesn't the fact that it's so different than almost anything out there currently not make it safe?

TomOpus
05-04-12, 02:51 PM
Since it's his Top Ten list, yes, it belongs on there.

islandclaws
05-04-12, 03:00 PM
You decide; it's all subjective.

I thought it was a very good film, and a wonderful technical achievement, but I can't see myself sitting down to watch it more than once every couple years.

Crocker Jarmen
05-04-12, 03:07 PM
I remember the article he wrote about it after first seeing at at Cannes; he wrote at length about how deeply moved he was by the film, how the childhood depicted in it was his same childhood in the 1950s. Knowing that he is towards the end of his life gave great significance to mystery and awesomeness of the cosmos. Watching the movie was a profoundly emotional experience for him, so it is no surprise he would include it on such a list.

Troy Stiffler
05-04-12, 03:08 PM
No Braveheart, Fight Club and Dark Knight? Pft.

Randy Miller III
05-04-12, 03:10 PM
NSFW for language:

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/1GIGcWLwSDQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Crocker Jarmen
05-04-12, 03:10 PM
Here is Ebert's first piece on Tree of Life, worth reading.

http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2011/05/a_prayer_beneath_the_tree_of_l.html

Terrence Malick's new film is a form of prayer. It created within me a spiritual awareness, and made me more alert to the awe of existence. I believe it stands free from conventional theologies, although at its end it has images that will evoke them for some people. It functions to pull us back from the distractions of the moment, and focus us on mystery and gratitude.

DaveyJoe
05-04-12, 03:25 PM
You decide; it's all subjective.

I agree with this. Film is subjective. If Ebert loved it that much, then from his perspective it's one of the 10 best films ever made. You may disagree, but neither you or he would be wrong. It's as simple as that.

AVP77
05-04-12, 03:44 PM
I usually really enjoy Malick's movies, but I couldn't even get to the end of Tree of Life. Kept forcing myself to watch more and more, then realized life is too short.

I think the directors that Ebert names there are some of the best ever, but, imho, most of those films listed aren't their best work. The movies picked are a bit dull, over serious, and, for lack of a better word, academic, which is something Ebert usually avoids.

Shannon Nutt
05-04-12, 04:06 PM
If you follow Ebert on Facebook or Twitter...he said the last time he did this survey for them, he wanted to put in a recent movie, so that's what he did this time. He dislikes the whole idea of a "best list" (he doesn't even like doing one at year's end, but he basically does one because the Sun-Times wants him to do one).

inri222
05-04-12, 04:08 PM
Do you agree with Ebert, that The Tree of Life is up there?


Hell no!!!

Solid Snake
05-04-12, 04:24 PM
No. Tree of Life isn't one of the best 10 ever made.

DaveyJoe
05-04-12, 04:47 PM
We could all post lists of the top 10 best films ever and nobody would would agree with them. We could even try to name just one film that belongs on that list and I doubt we could come to a consensus. The point is that looking at a list like that objectively is pointless. It's all subjective personal taste. Films are about what you bring to the viewing with your life experiences and how it affects you because of that. All of our experiences watching a movie are completely unique to us.

Ash Ketchum
05-04-12, 04:49 PM
I remember the article he wrote about it after first seeing at at Cannes; he wrote at length about how deeply moved he was by the film, how the childhood depicted in it was his same childhood in the 1950s. Knowing that he is towards the end of his life gave great significance to mystery and awesomeness of the cosmos. Watching the movie was a profoundly emotional experience for him, so it is no surprise he would include it on such a list.

Sounds to me like it belongs on his list of top ten religious experiences, not a list of films.

Trout
05-04-12, 04:51 PM
All of our experiences watching a movie are completely unique to us.

Bingo.

Even though I liked Tree, there are other Malick films that were way better.

CloverClover
05-04-12, 05:13 PM
I've never see anyone describe Tree of Life as safe and simplistic. You must be smarter than a computer.

P.S.-Doesn't the fact that it's so different than almost anything out there currently not make it safe?

I should've said instead, that it is good at faking being daring and complex.

the creation and heaven scenes for example, are too easy. they are the most literal expressions of 'creation' and 'afterlife' that someone can make. just showing a montage of animals. then showing a heaven where all your dead relatives are dancing. It means nothing to an audience. He surely could have gotten more creative than that.

I think the directors that Ebert names there are some of the best ever, but, imho, most of those films listed aren't their best work. The movies picked are a bit dull, over serious, and, for lack of a better word, academic, which is something Ebert usually avoids.

I agree, TTOL was made only to appear on 'best movies ever made' lists. It is why before the film was even released, people were saying it's the new 2001: A Space Odyssey. It's just hero worship and confirmation bias. ToL isn't like 2001 in any way shape or fashion. Compare the 20 minute hyperdrive scene to the 20 minute creation scene and you will see a filmmaker who knows what he is doing, vs a filmmaker who only sort of knows what he's doing.

Spottedfeather
05-04-12, 05:17 PM
No Braveheart, Fight Club and Dark Knight? Pft.

Of course not.

I'm extremely surprised he didn't put Ten Commandments, Maltese Falcon, Casablanca, or films like that. Citizen Kane ? Seriously ?

bluetoast
05-04-12, 05:22 PM
Tokyo Story over Make Way for Tomorrow? I disagree with that pick.

CloverClover
05-04-12, 05:25 PM
No Braveheart, Fight Club and Dark Knight? Pft.

I agree that the hero worship of gen X, pseudo-important stuff like Fight Club is nauseating as well, that's another issue all together.

Tree of Life's inclusion says more about America's desperation for Bergman/Tarkovsky-caliber filmmaking... so that the first thing that comes along that is remotely vague and grand will get lauded. There's my inner Armand White

Kurtie Dee
05-04-12, 05:40 PM
showing a heaven where all your dead relatives are dancing. It means nothing to an audience. He surely could have gotten more creative than that.





I wouldn't say I'd put TOL in the top ten, but I've got to disagree with the above statement.

On a purely artistic level, I think the simplicity of this scene rocks. <i>What Dreams May Come</i> by contrast, is maudlin, kitschy, gimmicky, etc.

Malick's quietly evocative summation of the backbone of religion - that we can be with our loved ones after they die - is smart and successful because he doesn't try to get 'creative', he shows with subtlety what many (most) people who've lost someone they care about really want.

Supermallet
05-04-12, 06:02 PM
Well, I personally disagree, but it's his list to make.

PopcornTreeCt
05-04-12, 06:17 PM
Nope.

PopcornTreeCt
05-04-12, 06:18 PM
I don't know if I'd put any film made in the 21st century on a top 10 of all-time list, but if I did, I'd prob opt for There Will Be Blood over anything else.

Exactly.

Only film from this century that should be on such a list.

arminius
05-04-12, 06:22 PM
Faversham

inri222
05-04-12, 07:03 PM
I don't know if I'd put any film made in the 21st century on a top 10 of all-time list, but if I did, I'd prob opt for There Will Be Blood over anything else.

Tie - Mulholland Dr. / Werckmeister Harmonies

Mr. Cinema
05-04-12, 07:06 PM
We could all post lists of the top 10 best films ever and nobody would would agree with them. We could even try to name just one film that belongs on that list and I doubt we could come to a consensus. The point is that looking at a list like that objectively is pointless. It's all subjective personal taste. Films are about what you bring to the viewing with your life experiences and how it affects you because of that. All of our experiences watching a movie are completely unique to us.
Of course no one's list would be the same, but if we did compile separate top 10 lists, I could see a few films appearing on the majority of them. I doubt The Tree of Life would appear on too many though.

Mr. Cinema
05-04-12, 07:08 PM
Exactly.

Only film from this century that should be on such a list.
Zodiac would be my choice.

Strevlac
05-04-12, 07:08 PM
I imagine that someone who has been knocking on deaths door as much as Ebert would really connect with something as spiritual and "life-affirming" as The Tree Of Life.

Even if it is a narcissistic, self-masturbatory, pseudo-artistic bore.

Supermallet
05-04-12, 08:06 PM
Zodiac would be my choice.

That's a damn good choice. Might be mine as well.

Or maybe I'd choose Ichi The Killer.

JumpCutz
05-04-12, 08:52 PM
Zodiac would be my choice.

Mine too. :thumbsup:

DaveyJoe
05-04-12, 08:53 PM
Of course no one's list would be the same, but if we did compile separate top 10 lists, I could see a few films appearing on the majority of them. I doubt The Tree of Life would appear on too many though.

That's true, but does that really make Ebert wrong? It's too subjective for a right or wrong type of scenario. I stand by my claim that we couldn't pick a single film that we'd all agree on.

CharlieK
05-04-12, 09:01 PM
Zodiac would be my choice.

That's a damn good choice. Might be mine as well.

Mine too. :thumbsup:

Wow, I knew it was well regarding - I like it very much - but I didn't think people considered it THE best movie of the past 12 years. High Praise.

Rockmjd23
05-04-12, 09:05 PM
Zodiac was great but was overshadowed in 2007 by No Country for Old Men and There Will be Blood. It was still robbed of a best picture nomination, though (Juno :lol: ).

tommyp007
05-04-12, 09:06 PM
No. Nowhere close. I am really surprised that Casablanca isn't on that list, considering it's his favorite film.

Supermallet
05-04-12, 11:34 PM
Zodiac is one of those movies that continues to reveal more and more with every viewing. I would say it's Fincher's best film.

Osiris3657
05-04-12, 11:39 PM
Exactly.

Only film from this century that should be on such a list.

and we know for you that film is Drive :rolleyes:

Supermallet
05-04-12, 11:43 PM
He was referring to There Will Be Blood. :confused:

Labor
05-04-12, 11:46 PM
It's not even close to being Malick's best film.

JumpCutz
05-05-12, 12:00 AM
Zodiac is one of those movies that continues to reveal more and more with every viewing. I would say it's Fincher's best film.

:thumbsup:

I think it's unequivocally his best film and it does indeed reveal more with subsequent viewings. Also... it's Ruffalo's finest work and one of Downey's best performances.

Osiris3657
05-05-12, 12:00 AM
He was referring to There Will Be Blood. :confused:

I was kidding, but he did have a major hard on for Drive. Just read the thread.

PopcornTreeCt
05-05-12, 01:38 AM
Tokyo Story over Make Way for Tomorrow? I disagree with that pick.

I finally watched Make Way for Tomorrow tonight. Blown away. It was depressingly honest and 75 years later still feels like a modern story.

argh923
05-05-12, 01:26 PM
Never heard of it.

In fact, I've only heard of 4 of the movies on that list.

TomOpus
05-05-12, 01:43 PM
Never heard of it.

In fact, I've only heard of 4 of the movies on that list.Seriously? Which ones, because I would think you'd have to know 6 of those as a casual movie-goer.

argh923
05-05-12, 02:03 PM
Apocalypse Now, Raging Bull, 2001, and Citizen Kane

Tarantino
05-05-12, 02:15 PM
Hell no.

TomOpus
05-05-12, 02:15 PM
Apocalypse Now, Raging Bull, 2001, and Citizen KaneThe other two I would imagine most people would know is Vertigo and La Dolce Vita... or maybe The General.

PopcornTreeCt
05-05-12, 02:36 PM
It's not even close to being Malick's best film.

Yup.

Gunde
05-05-12, 04:15 PM
Why does a movie have to be old to be considered one of the best ever?

arminius
05-05-12, 06:48 PM
It's funny. I have only seen 6 of the 10 movies on the list,
Aguirre, Wrath of God (Herzog)
Apocalypse Now (Coppola)
Citizen Kane (Welles)
The General (Keaton)
2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick)
Vertigo (Hitchcock)

And 5 of those I would agree with. Only Vertigo is iffy for the list.

Out of the other 4,
La Dolce Vita (Fellini) sounds interesting, must see
Raging Bull (Scorsese) I just have no interest in the subject matter
Tokyo Story (Ozu) I really want to see this, it sounds fantastic
The Tree of Life (Malick) sounds good, must see

Sondheim
05-06-12, 01:48 PM
Tree of Life is very good, but it's still only my third or fourth favorite Malick. If I had to pick a film from the 21st century for such a list it would be either The New World or The Son - not that I'd expect many to agree with those choices either.

From his list, both Aguirre and Vertigo would probably make my own top ten. 2001 and Tokyo Story (which I prefer over Make Way for Tomorrow) would be close.

utopianz14
05-06-12, 03:50 PM
Why does a movie have to be old to be considered one of the best ever?
It doesn't; the reason people have the impression you have is because all the truly, undeniably bad films in cinematic history have essentially been forgotten. Scholars rarely write about bad films, and arthouse theaters rarely show them. What's left is the impression that all old films are good, which isn't the case at all.

That said, I can think of very few movies from the past thirty years that I would even consider putting in my own top 10 list.

(From Ebert's list, Vertigo would definitely be on mine, and possibly Citizen Kane and 2001.)

Rockmjd23
05-06-12, 09:01 PM
I completely agree with the IMDB top ten list!

Mabuse
05-07-12, 04:53 PM
What were Ebert's picks for the Sight & Sound poll back in 2002? What did he drop to include Tree of Life?

inri222
05-07-12, 05:52 PM
What were Ebert's picks for the Sight & Sound poll back in 2002? What did he drop to include Tree of Life?


The Dekalog (Kieslowski) was replaced by The Tree of Life (Malick)

Drexl
05-07-12, 05:58 PM
What were Ebert's picks for the Sight & Sound poll back in 2002? What did he drop to include Tree of Life?

They were all the same, except that he had The Decalogue instead of TTOL: http://www.bfi.org.uk/sightandsound/polls/topten/poll/voter.php?forename=Roger&surname=Ebert. They're listed in order from 1 to 10, but they're alphabetical, so I have to assume he does it without ranking them. I don't know if SAS weighs the votes, but if so I hope they get them in the right order.

Somebody mentioned Juno. Oddly enough, that was Ebert's pick for the best film of 2007. :lol:

inri222
05-07-12, 06:14 PM
Oddly enough, that was Ebert's pick for the best film of 2007. :lol:

:hscratch: Are we talking about the same 2007 that these came out :

Eastern Promises
There Will Be Blood
Zodiac
No Country for Old Men
4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days
Control
The Counterfeiters
Before the Devil Knows You're Dead
Gone Baby Gone
Paranoid Park
Into the Wild
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
I'm Not There

Rockmjd23
05-07-12, 06:54 PM
Somebody mentioned Juno. Oddly enough, that was Ebert's pick for the best film of 2007. :lol:
And his pick of TOL will sound just as silly in 5 years.

Sondheim
05-07-12, 09:20 PM
Well, it's not like there weren't already a lot of people who thought Juno was a terrible choice back in 2007. I don't think time will be particularly hard on ToL - lots of people will continue to really like it, and a lot of other people will really dislike it. It's not like Juno where, in 20 years time, all the references and music and stylistic devices will seem hopelessly dated and even its initial defenders will be likely to withdraw some of their praise.