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View Full Version : Diet of Buckyballs nearly doubles lifespan in lab rats


Dr Mabuse
05-01-12, 03:27 PM
Interesting stuff. I suppose this could possibly lead to gains in longevity if the results are repeatable and then ultimately pan out for humans, but it's way too early to tell now.

Diet of buckyballs nearly doubles rat lifespan

By Brian Dodson

22:08 April 22, 2012

Sometimes I (almost) envy mice, rats, and yeast - it seems that almost any aging research we carry out on them doubles their lifespan and returns semi-senescent (say, a human equivalent of about 60 years of age - not thinking of anyone in particular, of course) to youthful vigor. It now appears that dramatic anti-aging results are associated with dietary ingestion of buckyballs, more properly known as C-60 fullerene.

A recent French study looking for chronic toxicity resulting from ingesting buckyballs dissolved in olive oil found that 10 month old rats who ingested the human equivalent of a tenth of a gram of C-60 buckyballs (which in technical grades cost less than US$10/gram) several times a week showed extended lifespans instead of toxic effects.

All C-60-treated rats survived to at least 59 months, with the oldest surviving to 66 months. The control group lived for periods ranging from 17 months to 37 months, while an additional group fed only the extra olive oil lived for periods of 36 to 57 months. For the curious, the olive oil dosage was equivalent to a person adding about eight tablespoons of uncooked olive oil to their daily diet without compensating for the additional calories. Similar results have been reported for mammals held in a state of semi-starvation, but that is obviously not a pleasant lifestyle.

All fullerenes are susceptible to clumping when dissolved in oil, so the preparation of the olive-oil/C-60 solution is rather lengthy. In these tests, 50 mg of C-60 buckyballs were added to 10 ml of virgin olive oil. These were stirred for two weeks at ambient temperatures with no incident light. Following the stirring, the solutions were centrifuged at 5,000 g for an hour. The fluid was separated from the precipitate, and was then passed through a 0.25 micron filter. The resulting liquid contained 0.8 mg/ml of C-60 buckyballs.

The results beg the question - what is going on here? Is the life extension just for those lucky rats again, or is there a mechanism that might transfer over to humans? The study was aimed at discovering if a diet of buckyballs has any toxic effects, and the good news is that no toxicity was found. The buckyballs did move throughout the body (including the brain and central nervous system), and even enter individual cells. The ingested C-60 had an elimination half-life from blood of about 10 hours, so was essentially fully eliminated from the body within two days. It is not clear from the report if the C-60 was eliminated from intracellular fluid on that time scale.

Specific studies of the effect of C-60 buckyballs on oxidative stress in the rats were performed by studying the effects of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injection. Carbon tetrachloride is well known to be poisonous to rats, being highly hepatotoxic (toxic to the liver). It is also associated with delirium and intoxication such as is experienced in the abuse of solvents.

Rats which had been pretreated by water, by olive oil, and by olive oil containing C-60 buckyballs all showed typical signs of intoxication within a few minutes of CCl4 injection. However, while intoxication persisted in the water and olive oil groups for 24 hours, the olive oil and C-60 group emerged from intoxication after only five hours.

In rats experiencing the pretreatment, but unexposed to carbon tetrachloride, autopsy revealed essentially normal livers. In those given a CCl4 injection, however, the livers from rats pretreated with water or olive oil showed important damage - a great deal of inflammation as well as large necrotic areas (dying or dead tissue). In contrast, the livers from rats pretreated with olive oil and C-60 buckyballs showed little damage or CCl4-induced cell death. Biochemical markers of liver damage showed far less elevation in the rats pretreated with olive oil and C-60.

It does appear there is a real physiological effect on metabolic processes, and that oxidative stress in particular is significantly reduced in rats by chronic oral ingestion of an olive oil/C-60 solution. As oxidative stress is one of the factors usually associated with aging, there may well be a reasonable mechanism for the lifespan extension, especially if excess oxidation within individual cells is prevented by intracellular buckyballs. Will people react to a treatment of this sort with lifespans of 180-200 years? Only time will tell.

The research was recently published in the journal Biomaterials


http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii18/drmabuse06/Forum%20comments/link.gif (http://www.gizmag.com/diet-buckyballs-extending-lifespan/22245/)

PhantomStranger
05-01-12, 03:36 PM
Mice and rodents rarely work as great proxies for human biology. Labs use them because they are cheap and plentiful and there are no ethical considerations. Even if the effect does work in humans, I suspect the magnitude of improvement in life span will be greatly reduced to months. We already know that calorie-restricted diets improve lifespans in primates.

X
05-01-12, 03:42 PM
Isn't carbon in general good to ingest in order to remove toxins? I don't know if it gets into the bloodstream though.

Spottedfeather
05-01-12, 03:42 PM
So...swallow magnets and live forever ? Cool.

DeputyDave
05-01-12, 03:48 PM
Am I the only one who has never heard the term "buckyballs"?

DirkUSA
05-01-12, 03:52 PM
Am I the only one who has never heard the term "buckyballs"?

No, you are not.

Cusm
05-01-12, 03:56 PM
Am I the only one who has never heard the term "buckyballs"?

No you are not. I thought it was some kind of Floridian Yobogoya chain.

NORML54601
05-01-12, 03:57 PM
Am I the only one who has never heard the term "buckyballs"?

Nope

dork
05-01-12, 03:57 PM
Ah, so that's Captain America's secret.

The Infidel
05-01-12, 03:59 PM
I realize those of us who don't know what the hell buckyballs are could simply Google it, but it would have been nice to learn what they are as part of the initial post.

kgrogers1979
05-01-12, 04:14 PM
Ah, so that's Captain America's secret.

That's what I was thinking too. No way would I want to eat Bucky's balls just to live longer.

And unless this slows down the aging process who would want to live to be 200 years old anyway? The human body has pretty much become completely decrepit by age 100, so those last hundred years of life would be a real bitch.

The secret to living forever is to become a vampire because that stops the aging process.

Supermallet
05-01-12, 04:51 PM
I thought buckyballs were those magnetic balls that woot sells from time to time.

Rockmjd23
05-01-12, 04:58 PM
Is buckyballs a regional term like 'pop'?

Nick Danger
05-01-12, 05:02 PM
Mice and rodents rarely work as great proxies for human biology. Labs use them because they are cheap and plentiful and there are no ethical considerations. Even if the effect does work in humans, I suspect the magnitude of improvement in life span will be greatly reduced to months. We already know that calorie-restricted diets improve life spans in primates.

I've always been suspicious of that. If minimum a calorie diet worked, then all those acetic monks and nuns would have lived to great old ages. But the died at the same rate as everyone else. Probably faster, because their bodies had no energy reserves for fighting diseases.

Jules Winfield
05-01-12, 05:03 PM
Ah, so that's Captain America's secret.

:lol:

kvrdave
05-01-12, 05:07 PM
Egads, buckyballs are not universally known? definitely google them. They are incredible.

The Cow
05-01-12, 05:11 PM
Egads, buckyballs are not universally known? definitely google them. They are incredible.

Even frozen?

kvrdave
05-01-12, 05:25 PM
They are like Tiggers, and as we all know, Tiggers are wonderful things. Their tops are made out of rubber and their bottoms are made out of springs. They're bouncy, trouncy, flouncy, pouncy, fun, fun, fun, fun, fun.

The Bus
05-01-12, 05:27 PM
I'm going to go eat a diamond covered in olive oil. Will report back.

Navinabob
05-01-12, 05:44 PM
I've always been suspicious of that. If minimum a calorie diet worked, then all those acetic monks and nuns would have lived to great old ages. But the died at the same rate as everyone else. Probably faster, because their bodies had no energy reserves for fighting diseases.

It's true for most animals actually (to varied degrees). One of the few it isn't true for is people. Plus, once we studied those people closely, we found out that they were off on how old they self-reported they we're by a decade or two.

arminius
05-01-12, 05:44 PM
After googling buckyballs you may want to check out atoms and stuff. It's amazing.

Dr Mabuse
05-01-12, 05:57 PM
I did make the assumption that the carbon structures named after the venerable Mr Fuller were widely known.

Supermallet
05-01-12, 06:00 PM
I thought buckyballs were those magnetic balls that woot sells from time to time.

I was right!

http://www.getbuckyballs.com/

Supermallet
05-01-12, 06:02 PM
I did make the assumption that the carbon structures named after the venerable Mr Fuller were widely known.

Oh, you mean Buckminsterfullerene. Why didn't you say so?

starman9000
05-01-12, 06:06 PM
"Assumptions make an ass out of you and me" - attributed to unnamed 13th century social studies teacher -

Jason
05-01-12, 06:22 PM
Egads, buckyballs are not universally known? definitely google them. They are incredible.

According to Wiki, buckyballs are "a spherical fullerene molecule with the formula C60".

Sounds delicious, Sheldon.

rexinnih
05-01-12, 08:08 PM
Am I the only one who has never heard the term "buckyballs"?

Nope but at least I wasn't alone with thinking the Captain America reference.

focker
05-01-12, 10:44 PM
It sounds like almost all of the effects observed are attributable to the olive oil and the rats' diet in general. The controls who got the the same diet without the buckyballs lived nearly as long.

The Infidel
05-01-12, 10:56 PM
"Assumptions make an ass out of you and me" - attributed to unnamed 13th century social studies teacher -
"When you make an assumption, you make an ass out of 'u' and 'mption'." - Mitch Henessey.

tasha99
05-01-12, 11:20 PM
Buckeyballs--the magnets--are going to need to add a warning to their packaging: Warning, Buckeyballs do not increase lifespan in rats. Do not ingest.

PhantomStranger
05-01-12, 11:38 PM
I've always been suspicious of that. If minimum a calorie diet worked, then all those acetic monks and nuns would have lived to great old ages. But the died at the same rate as everyone else. Probably faster, because their bodies had no energy reserves for fighting diseases.
The full approach is called calorie restriction with adequate nutrition. It was simply impossible before modern vitamins and supplements were discovered to acquire the essential adequate nutrition necessary to survive healthy at the recommended low levels of caloric intake.

One of the key side-effects of the diet are the vastly lower cancer rates seen in mammals.

The Bus
05-02-12, 04:00 AM
I did make the assumption that the carbon structures named after the venerable Mr Fuller were widely known.

:rolleyes: You mean the C60 molecule?