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Do Indian Premier League (IPL) is healthy for cricket ? [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum
 
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View Full Version : Do Indian Premier League (IPL) is healthy for cricket ?


amit123steve
05-01-12, 04:16 AM
My concern is it fair cricket where same country men's stand infront of each other as an opponent.

starman9000
05-01-12, 07:56 AM
Do you think IPL players shouldn't be allowed in international competition?

B.A.
05-01-12, 09:02 AM
I'm worried about rampant steroid abuse by the league's top batsmen.

Maxflier
05-01-12, 09:37 AM
I think so.

Me007gold
05-01-12, 10:27 AM
As long as they do not use 10lb balls, I think its fair.

wendersfan
05-01-12, 12:44 PM
I don't think it matters. This sort of thing happens in a lot of sports.

amit123steve
05-02-12, 03:35 AM
I don't think it matters. This sort of thing happens in a lot of sports.

But IS this healthy practice to play cricket where as lots of one days and test is played in a year but IPL is really not good for team health or you can say money is grabbing the players to play against each other with whatever the health status should be. For a national players they have to stand when International games will come and they represent their country.

B.A.
05-02-12, 08:36 AM
If they are going to be the best - they might as well play the best on an increased basis.

Autotelik
05-06-12, 01:32 AM
Not sure if I understand your question correctly, but in general, I have always disliked the shorter version of the sport. Give me a test match anytime. I like watching the strategy unfold over 3-5 days. One-dayers are tolerable, but Twenty-20? That's for people who have no attention span and is constructed in a way that tries to squeeze the sport into a 3-hour version to conform to a length that people can handle (e.g. basketball, football, baseball etc).

I've never understood the dislike by so many for Test cricket. It's the purist form of the sport, and has been for well over a hundred years. It may go for 5 days, but so what? You never hear about people complaining that 4-rounds of golf is too hard to watch. Imagine if golf was reduced to a series of 1-day tournaments.

As for your question about is it "healthy." I would think not. It calls for a different style of play, and the wear and tear of all these matches may mean that the players are not at 100% health for international cricket. Since most of the IPL players are Indian cricketers, there may be some correlation between the extended play and the downturn in Indian international cricket in recent years. They're not as dominant as they once were- that's a fact. They got killed by the Aussies in their last away series.

Maybe an analogy would be NBA players participating in the Olympics. More basketball time in the off-season may make them more tired for the regular season. And if the Olympics happened every year (like the IPL does), then it might be a no-brainer that players don't feel so fresh year after year.

amit123steve
05-08-12, 09:01 AM
Not sure if I understand your question correctly, but in general, I have always disliked the shorter version of the sport. Give me a test match anytime. I like watching the strategy unfold over 3-5 days. One-dayers are tolerable, but Twenty-20? That's for people who have no attention span and is constructed in a way that tries to squeeze the sport into a 3-hour version to conform to a length that people can handle (e.g. basketball, football, baseball etc).

I've never understood the dislike by so many for Test cricket. It's the purist form of the sport, and has been for well over a hundred years. It may go for 5 days, but so what? You never hear about people complaining that 4-rounds of golf is too hard to watch. Imagine if golf was reduced to a series of 1-day tournaments.

As for your question about is it "healthy." I would think not. It calls for a different style of play, and the wear and tear of all these matches may mean that the players are not at 100% health for international cricket. Since most of the IPL players are Indian cricketers, there may be some correlation between the extended play and the downturn in Indian international cricket in recent years. They're not as dominant as they once were- that's a fact. They got killed by the Aussies in their last away series.

Maybe an analogy would be NBA players participating in the Olympics. More basketball time in the off-season may make them more tired for the regular season. And if the Olympics happened every year (like the IPL does), then it might be a no-brainer that players don't feel so fresh year after year.

Thanks
It is really important to have the strength inside you to cope up each problem when required.So be healthy pleyers and play hard for the country not only for yourself.

Quake1028
05-08-12, 10:06 AM
I don't think it matters. This sort of thing happens in a lot of sports.

But IS this healthy practice to play cricket where as lots of one days and test is played in a year but IPL is really not good for team health or you can say money is grabbing the players to play against each other with whatever the health status should be. For a national players they have to stand when International games will come and they represent their country.

Threeve.