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DVD Reviews

View Full Version : Google's first self-driving car


mhg83
03-31-12, 08:58 AM
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/cdgQpa1pUUE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Amazing piece of Tech but what happens when one part of the computer fails and causes an accident?

emanon
03-31-12, 09:05 AM
In before the first "problem with the tranny" or "what it if blows a head" comment.

antspawn
03-31-12, 09:29 AM
That is awesome for people that are going blind.

It looks like you can also attach a propeller on the roof and it would fly?

Solid Snake
03-31-12, 12:00 PM
That is awesome.

Rockmjd23
03-31-12, 12:03 PM
Meh. Cheetahbot would tear that apart.

Greg MacGuffin
03-31-12, 12:10 PM
Amazing piece of Tech but what happens when one part of the computer fails and causes an accident?

The same thing that happens when a person fails and causes an accident.

shizawn
03-31-12, 12:30 PM
One step closer to Johnny Cab :up:

Tracer Bullet
03-31-12, 02:12 PM
I read the Wired article on this. It's only legal because each self-driving car has a licensed driver in the driver's seat. I'm not really sure how letting a blind guy sit there is legal.

Drexl
03-31-12, 02:17 PM
It's almost as cool as their new platform for maps:

rznYifPHxDg

TomOpus
03-31-12, 02:29 PM
Best part is this guy can use his cell phone and drive at the same time.

D.Pham4GLTE (>60GB)
03-31-12, 07:17 PM
Best part is this guy can use his cell phone and drive at the same time.

question is, would he get a ticket for using his cell phone while driving, since he isn't really driving?

TomOpus
03-31-12, 08:37 PM
question is, would he get a ticket for using his cell phone while driving, since he isn't really driving?And if he gets caught for a moving violation does Google get the ticket?

kvrdave
03-31-12, 08:51 PM
Did they use a Prius because if you are going to be a douche, you should be in a douchemobile?

mhg83
03-31-12, 09:29 PM
From Wiki:

Fewer crashes, due to the autonomous system's increased reliability compared to human drivers[1]
Increased roadway capacity due to reduced need of safety gaps[2] for example by platooning, and the ability to better manage traffic flow.[1]
Relief of vehicle occupants from driving and navigation chores.[1]
Removal of constraints on occupant's state - it would not matter if the occupants were too young, too old or if their frame of mind were not suitable to drive a traditional car. Furthermore, disabilities would no longer matter.[3]
Elimination of redundant passengers - humans are not required to take the car anywhere, as the robotic car can drive empty to wherever it is required.[3]
Alleviation of parking scarcity as cars could drop off passengers, park far away where space is not scarce, and return as needed to pick up passengers.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autonomous_car

Also i can see Big companies no longer needing Truck Drivers if they use this Tech

kvrdave
03-31-12, 09:39 PM
Here is the big problem. I crash into you because of my fault, and you will only get so much money because of my insurance cap, and the fact that I only have so much money. But if a car crashes into you because of Google's fault, how much potential liability is there? They would get sued for far more than I would.

The cost of liability would have to be built in, and it seems like it would be a lot, not because crashes happen more often, but when they do, the payout is potentially so much bigger.

Goat3001
03-31-12, 09:54 PM
This would be amazing in cabs. Jump in, type where you want to go and no need to deal with asshole cab drivers. The idea of cutting out the loud car horns makes me very happy.

wmansir
04-01-12, 12:59 AM
I read the Wired article on this. It's only legal because each self-driving car has a licensed driver in the driver's seat. I'm not really sure how letting a blind guy sit there is legal.
I was thinking the same thing. If I recall Google's cars have passenger side secondary brakes (like a driving instructor's car) plus a kill switch/button on the center console. Still, I don't know if someone without a legal driving license could operate the vehicle from the drivers seat since they are the only ones that can override the steering.

Here is the big problem. I crash into you because of my fault, and you will only get so much money because of my insurance cap, and the fact that I only have so much money. But if a car crashes into you because of Google's fault, how much potential liability is there? They would get sued for far more than I would.

The cost of liability would have to be built in, and it seems like it would be a lot, not because crashes happen more often, but when they do, the payout is potentially so much bigger.

That's a good point. There will always be product liability suits due to defects, but I think google (not that I think it will actually be google, but maybe a car mfg) could get insurance companies to cover "operator error" claims if they can prove the system is significantly safer than human drivers. Operator error by humans account for the vast majority of accidents, so there are great potential savings in terms of money and lives.

msdmoney
04-01-12, 01:59 AM
From the video, self driving cars get to park in handicap spots too, awesome.

krkuhl
04-01-12, 10:08 AM
As someone who commutes 1 hour each way 3 days a week, I would LOVE something like this where I could sit and ro paperwork instead of driving!

nickdawgy
04-01-12, 10:20 AM
I keep thinking this is an April Fools Day joke.

Mrs. Danger
04-01-12, 10:20 AM
I'm pretty sure a Google car has already crashed... into another Google car.

TomOpus
04-01-12, 10:39 AM
From the video, self driving cars get to park in handicap spots too, awesome. Hope you're kidding with this post since the car pretty much has nothing to do with who's allowed to park in those spaces.

mhg83
12-13-12, 05:38 PM
Self-driving cars now legal in California

(CNN) -- California is the latest state to allow testing of Google's self-driving cars on the roads, though only with a human passenger along as a safety measure.
Gov. Edmund "Jerry" Brown signed the autonomous-vehicles bill into law Tuesday afternoon alongside Google co-founder Sergey Brin and State Sen. Alex Padilla, who authored the bill, at Google's headquarters in Mountain View, California. The bill, SB 1298, will set up procedures and requirements for determining when the cars are road-ready.
Brin hopes that self-driving cars will be able to drive on public streets in five years or less.
You won't need a driver's license by 2040
"Anybody who first gets in the car and finds the car is driving will be a little skittish. But they'll get over it," said Brown when asked if the California Highway Patrol was on board with the plan.
CNN test-drives 'self-driving car' Google's self driving Prius
The cars use a combination of technologies, including radar sensors on the front, video cameras aimed at the surrounding area, various other sensors and artificial-intelligence software that helps steer. Google is the most visible company working on these types of vehicles, but similar projects are under way at other organizations, including Caltech.
Google has already been testing the cars on the road in Nevada, which passed a law last year authorizing driverless vehicles. Both Nevada and California require the cars to have a human behind the wheel who can take control of the vehicle at any time.
So far, the cars have have racked up more than 300,000 driving miles, and 50,000 of those miles were without any intervention from the human drivers, Google says.
Overheard on CNN.com: Autonomous cars reduce 'crashes'?
There have been no accidents while the cars were controlled by the computer. The only documented accident with one of the Google vehicles was a fender bender that took place while a human was in control.
Brin, who sported a pair of Google glasses at the media event without comment, said the cars could address a variety of current transportation issues. First and foremost, he said, the self-driving cars would be safer than human-driven cars. There were just under 33,000 deaths from motor vehicle accidents in the United States in 2010.
They also could ferry around people who are usually unable to to drive, such as blind people.
"Some people have other disabilities, some people are too young, some people are too old, sometimes we're too intoxicated," said Brin.
Ideally, a car that drives itself can minimize traffic by chaining together with other self-driving vehicles and using highways more efficiently. Drivers wouldn't be limited to listening to NPR and honking during their morning commute; instead they could use that time to be productive, like the millions of people who take public transit currently do.
Atlanta turns to variable speed limits to ease traffic
Brin also discussed the many parking lots in urban and suburban areas, calling them "a scar to the surface of the Earth." Self-driving cars would be able to drop you off at work and then pick up another person instead of idling in a parking lot. If you did opt to own your own car, it could park itself in the most efficient way possible.
Consumer Watchdog, a consumer-rights group, has expressed reservations about the cars on privacy grounds, saying they would allow Google to gather personal information about passengers.
Google's fleet of vehicles started with Toyota Prius Hybrids and later added the Lexus RX450h, a crossover SUV, to test on different terrain. The project is directed by Sebastian Thrun, who also co-founded Google Street View.
There are many legal and technical problems still to be worked out before the cars are commonplace. Asked who would get the ticket when a driverless car runs a red light, Brin replied, "Self-driving cars do not run red lights."

http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/25/tech/innovation/self-driving-car-california/index.html

The bolded part brings up a good point. How many states are gonna ban these cars due to lost revenue in traffic tickets? The computer is going to follow all traffic laws. Red light cameras will become obsolete if self-driving cars become the norm.

Drexl
12-13-12, 05:53 PM
I thought you were able to take control if you want? People who run red lights now aren't going to just sit there and let the car decide to stop.

Although, I wonder if they could block overriding in the case of stoplights.

astrochimp
12-13-12, 05:56 PM
I didn't see any mention of the price but I did notice it took him to the cleaners.

D.Pham4GLTE (>60GB)
12-13-12, 10:15 PM
So far, the cars have have racked up more than 300,000 driving miles, and 50,000 of those miles were without any intervention from the human drivers, Google says.


So basically 83% of the time there has been human intervention...

DVD Polizei
12-13-12, 11:32 PM
Which is probably better than a non-Google vehicle, in any given city.

palebluedot
12-14-12, 10:50 AM
One of these was parked in front of my house the other day...my wife and I wondered if it drove itself there...we didn't see it arrive or leave...so it's possible.

the_dude8
12-14-12, 09:03 PM
Self-driving cars now legal in California

(CNN) -- California is the latest state to allow testing of Google's self-driving cars on the roads, though only with a human passenger along as a safety measure.
Gov. Edmund "Jerry" Brown signed the autonomous-vehicles bill into law Tuesday afternoon alongside Google co-founder Sergey Brin and State Sen. Alex Padilla, who authored the bill, at Google's headquarters in Mountain View, California. The bill, SB 1298, will set up procedures and requirements for determining when the cars are road-ready.
Brin hopes that self-driving cars will be able to drive on public streets in five years or less.
You won't need a driver's license by 2040
"Anybody who first gets in the car and finds the car is driving will be a little skittish. But they'll get over it," said Brown when asked if the California Highway Patrol was on board with the plan.
CNN test-drives 'self-driving car' Google's self driving Prius
The cars use a combination of technologies, including radar sensors on the front, video cameras aimed at the surrounding area, various other sensors and artificial-intelligence software that helps steer. Google is the most visible company working on these types of vehicles, but similar projects are under way at other organizations, including Caltech.
Google has already been testing the cars on the road in Nevada, which passed a law last year authorizing driverless vehicles. Both Nevada and California require the cars to have a human behind the wheel who can take control of the vehicle at any time.
So far, the cars have have racked up more than 300,000 driving miles, and 50,000 of those miles were without any intervention from the human drivers, Google says.
Overheard on CNN.com: Autonomous cars reduce 'crashes'?
There have been no accidents while the cars were controlled by the computer. The only documented accident with one of the Google vehicles was a fender bender that took place while a human was in control.
Brin, who sported a pair of Google glasses at the media event without comment, said the cars could address a variety of current transportation issues. First and foremost, he said, the self-driving cars would be safer than human-driven cars. There were just under 33,000 deaths from motor vehicle accidents in the United States in 2010.
They also could ferry around people who are usually unable to to drive, such as blind people.
"Some people have other disabilities, some people are too young, some people are too old, sometimes we're too intoxicated," said Brin.
Ideally, a car that drives itself can minimize traffic by chaining together with other self-driving vehicles and using highways more efficiently. Drivers wouldn't be limited to listening to NPR and honking during their morning commute; instead they could use that time to be productive, like the millions of people who take public transit currently do.
Atlanta turns to variable speed limits to ease traffic
Brin also discussed the many parking lots in urban and suburban areas, calling them "a scar to the surface of the Earth." Self-driving cars would be able to drop you off at work and then pick up another person instead of idling in a parking lot. If you did opt to own your own car, it could park itself in the most efficient way possible.
Consumer Watchdog, a consumer-rights group, has expressed reservations about the cars on privacy grounds, saying they would allow Google to gather personal information about passengers.
Google's fleet of vehicles started with Toyota Prius Hybrids and later added the Lexus RX450h, a crossover SUV, to test on different terrain. The project is directed by Sebastian Thrun, who also co-founded Google Street View.
There are many legal and technical problems still to be worked out before the cars are commonplace. Asked who would get the ticket when a driverless car runs a red light, Brin replied, "Self-driving cars do not run red lights."

http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/25/tech/innovation/self-driving-car-california/index.html

The bolded part brings up a good point. How many states are gonna ban these cars due to lost revenue in traffic tickets? The computer is going to follow all traffic laws. Red light cameras will become obsolete if self-driving cars become the norm.

how well the car handle itself during the cluster fuck of LA traffic nightmare 24/7?

Spottedfeather
12-15-12, 02:57 AM
First, they're driving themselves. Then, they're thinking for themselves. Then, Judgement Day....

kvrdave
12-15-12, 03:29 AM
So will it be open source? Just imagine the mods that could be done to these.

DRG
12-17-12, 10:53 AM
"Some people have other disabilities, some people are too young, some people are too old, sometimes we're too intoxicated," said Brin.

How is that going to work? They'd have to seriously change the way the DUI laws are written to allow that, considering people can currently get a DUI when their car isn't even running.

Tracer Bullet
12-17-12, 11:24 AM
How is that going to work? They'd have to seriously change the way the DUI laws are written to allow that, considering people can currently get a DUI when their car isn't even running.

I imagine the laws would have to be updated to allow this, but it seems trivial to have a record of when the car was under manual control and when the car was under computer control, and to allow for drunk passengers under the latter scenario.

Of course, this presumes that computer-controlled cars are not going to require manual intervention, and I don't think we can assume that.

Hiro11
12-17-12, 11:42 AM
The big problem with these cars is that the base expectation is total operating perfection. There is zero room for error. The first car that causes an accident as a result of software or hardware failure will immediately result in the entire project being shut down, at least for a time. It will be a press field day as well.

This is a ridiculously high bar for any piece of technology, let alone something as complex as an autonomous car. I don't see why Google wants to be in this business given the limited potential for success and the seemingly infinite potential for disaster, liability and bad press.

Draven
12-17-12, 11:59 AM
The big problem with these cars is that the base expectation is total operating perfection. There is zero room for error. The first car that causes an accident as a result of software or hardware failure will immediately result in the entire project being shut down, at least for a time. It will be a press field day as well.

This is a ridiculously high bar for any piece of technology, let alone something as complex as an autonomous car. I don't see why Google wants to be in this business given the limited potential for success and the seemingly infinite potential for disaster, liability and bad press.

In theory, yes but we allow millions of drivers to get behind the wheel, most of whom are less reliable than a computer. I think it'll be an interesting time to see how things change.

Hiro11
12-17-12, 12:08 PM
In theory, yes but we allow millions of drivers to get behind the wheel, most of which are less reliable than a computer.Logically, you're probably right. Unfortunately, overreaction, suspicion and fear and not logic are going to be people's reaction to these cars when (not if) there's an accident. Even if someone else is at fault, it will be Google's problem to deal with.

Drexl
12-17-12, 12:21 PM
Exactly, because when a human is involved in an accident, people can say "that won't happen to me, because I'm a good driver." When the computer is involved, they're afraid because they aren't in control.

Draven
12-17-12, 12:52 PM
That's why I say it will be interesting. I imagine something similar happened when the first cars hit the road (but where are the horses?!?!). I know it's at a completely different scale but it wouldn't be the first time we trusted technology to do something better than we do it ourselves.

Aren't airplanes pretty much flown by computers from start to finish these days?

darkflounder
12-17-12, 07:08 PM
I've seen two of the Google self-driving cars around the bay area. One was at highway speeds with no traffic. The other was in full-on highway-speed dense traffic. Both times, the car signalled lane changes. Which automatically makes it 100% better drivers than the typical human drivers around here.

zyzzle
12-17-12, 11:20 PM
For those who think logically (a minority, and becoming more so every day), the Google self-driving car makes a great deal of sense. I can't wait to get one....

The unfortunate reality is that it will be a liability nightmare for Google to deal with. It is one of those things that looks great on paper, while in practice, will be fraught with problems. Emotionally driven and litigious Californians will overreact when an accident occurs, and that'll be it... I give it five years tops before that happens, but the concept of a self-driving car is *spectacular*. Nice try, Google. Next up: the cloning debate.

spainlinx0
12-18-12, 12:31 AM
If I can't use my car as my designated driver, or to allow me to sleep while commuting, what is the point? I will trust we will get it where I don't have to worry, but I hope that the law doesn't say, even though you aren't driving, you need to be always prepared to take over control.