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View Full Version : Movies with "It was all a dream" moments?


PHMustang2000
03-27-12, 09:03 PM
What is your view on movies that end with the main character either in their head or having everything you watched up until that point be a dream. Do you wish the actual story you solve actually got resolved or do you like them with that twist ending?

Couple examples

The Wizard of Oz
The Sixth Sense

PopcornTreeCt
03-27-12, 09:04 PM
Yeah, this is going to be a major spoilage thread. Goodbye.

JumpCutz
03-27-12, 09:07 PM
Jacob's Ladder

See ya....:)

PHMustang2000
03-27-12, 09:10 PM
Jacob's Ladder

See ya....:)

I haven't seen Jacob's Ladder. What was you take on the ending. You can use spoiler tags if you need to.

I am actually doing a little research on this

Groucho
03-27-12, 09:31 PM
The Sixth SenseHuh? Not true at all.

Rockmjd23
03-27-12, 09:33 PM
The Sixth Sense?! :lol: Watch it again.

My favorite is Nightmare City

Groucho
03-27-12, 09:35 PM
Total Recall...or WAS IT?

kgrogers1979
03-27-12, 09:43 PM
How can you not know how the Sixth Sense ends? Its only one of the most spoilered movies of all time. Not knowing the ending is like not knowing Darth Vader is Luke's father.

Bruce Willis was dead the whole time. He's a ghost. Its not a dream.

wishbone
03-27-12, 09:49 PM
http://i42.tinypic.com/v43shx.gif

Solid Snake
03-27-12, 09:51 PM
I was going to post Inception cuz people for some goddamn reason thinks it's a dream to the end.

Troy Stiffler
03-27-12, 09:53 PM
Time Bandits

whoopdido
03-27-12, 10:22 PM
Yeah The Sixth Sense? WTF?

Twist? Sure, obviously. But a dream? Not so much.

PHMustang2000
03-27-12, 10:40 PM
How can you not know how the Sixth Sense ends? Its only one of the most spoilered movies of all time. Not knowing the ending is like not knowing Darth Vader is Luke's father.

Bruce Willis was dead the whole time. He's a ghost. Its not a dream.

Yes I have seen it, The Sixth Sense. I also will include movies with a twist you never saw coming. I read originally they were going to make the last scene with cole in the car with his mom. They added that ending later. Would the ending of worked without the bruce willis ending?

kgrogers1979
03-27-12, 10:47 PM
I read originally they were going to make the last scene with cole in the car with his mom. They added that ending later. Would the ending of worked without the bruce willis ending?

:hscratch:

Where in the world did you read that? On a first viewing it may not be so obvious, but on repeated viewings it is painfully obvious that it was intended all along. It wasn't something added later. There are many clues throughout the movie that Bruce Willis was dead.

davidh777
03-27-12, 10:49 PM
Yeah, this is going to be a major spoilage thread. Goodbye.

I avoid all threads like this or "Most shocking death in cinema?" :lol:

PHMustang2000
03-27-12, 10:55 PM
:hscratch:

Where in the world did you read that? On a first viewing it may not be so obvious, but on repeated viewings it is painfully obvious that it was intended all along. It wasn't something added later. There are many clues throughout the movie that Bruce Willis was dead.

I was watching the blu-ray and I heard it on one of the features

JumpCutz
03-27-12, 11:09 PM
I avoid all threads like this or "Most shocking death in cinema?" :lol:

...and yet here you are. -wink-

davidh777
03-27-12, 11:11 PM
...and yet here you are. -wink-

I know, I happened to click into this one just hoping to see a comment like PopcornTreeCt's, and now I'm trying to skim without reading any titles :lol:

dvdjunkie32
03-28-12, 08:01 AM
I don't like it when it is used as an easy cheat or way out for the writers. Identity is a prime example. Great movie until you learn at the end that the whole story was just a sicko's fantasy. Definitely ruins it for repeat viewing.

RichC2
03-28-12, 08:15 AM
I don't like it when it is used as an easy cheat or way out for the writers. Identity is a prime example. Great movie until you learn at the end that the whole story was just a sicko's fantasy. Definitely ruins it for repeat viewing.

I thought it worked great in Identity, and that's actually one of my favorite slasher-style thriller flicks. They gave it some gravity by essentially making whoever won the battle be his real life personality. However, even if that weren't the case, it's still a really fun movie.

Mulholland Drive is the first movie that comes to mind here, love that movie as well. Almost like a proper remake of The Wizard of Oz, with lesbians.

Dr. DVD
03-28-12, 09:56 AM
Haven't seen it, but I have heard that Human Centipede 2 leaves the impression that it was all some sicko's fantasy.
I will also say that if they ever want to re-boot the Alien franchise to exclude all but the first two, the set up for three and four being one big dream is done quite well in the second, with all of the talk dreams between Ripley and Newt.

Solid Snake
03-28-12, 10:09 AM
no. Just leave the latter part of the Alien franchise alone. Just stop. Prometheus on the other hand...fuck yes, motherfucker.

whoopdido
03-28-12, 10:35 AM
I thought it worked great in Identity, and that's actually one of my favorite slasher-style thriller flicks. They gave it some gravity by essentially making whoever won the battle be his real life personality. However, even if that weren't the case, it's still a really fun movie.

Mulholland Drive is the first movie that comes to mind here, love that movie as well. Almost like a proper remake of The Wizard of Oz, with lesbians.

I also agree that Identity worked great. It's not a perfect movie by any means, but I find it very entertaining even with repeat viewings. I thought the twist was very well done and when I first saw it I had no idea that was coming. Obviously the stuff with the judge, lawyers, mental patient, etc had something to do with the story, but I certainly didn't put two and two together and was pleasently surprised by the ending. I think a lot of twist endings fail miserably because the twist was just put in there for shits and giggles and really makes no sense, but personally I think Identity was done really well and with repeat viewings, like The Sixth Sense, it's much easier to figure out what's going on if you look at the clues.

Dr Mabuse
03-28-12, 10:53 AM
The best example I've ever seen, and probably the most intelligent and best made film about such a theme, is 'Point Blank'.

Mabuse
03-28-12, 12:14 PM
Invaders From Mars uses the "it was all a dream" brilliantly.

Meglos
03-28-12, 01:21 PM
Wisdom, a movie from the 80s starring Emelio Estevez and Demi Moore.

RocShemp
03-28-12, 02:33 PM
I never saw the remake but the original A Nightmare On Elm Street concludes with another nightmare controlled by Freddy.

The Bus
03-28-12, 03:19 PM
<b>Notorious</b>. He used to read <i>Word Up</i> magazine. Salt 'n' Pepa and Heavy D up in the limousine.

Troy Stiffler
03-28-12, 03:38 PM
Brazil (Director's Cut)

Mondo Kane
03-28-12, 04:05 PM
Wisdom, a movie from the 80s starring Emelio Estevez and Demi Moore.

This was actually the first one that came to mind.

<b>Notorious</b>. He used to read <i>Word Up</i> magazine. Salt 'n' Pepa and Heavy D up in the limousine.

Ah, clever.

dvdjunkie32
03-28-12, 04:08 PM
I also agree that Identity worked great. It's not a perfect movie by any means, but I find it very entertaining even with repeat viewings. I thought the twist was very well done and when I first saw it I had no idea that was coming. Obviously the stuff with the judge, lawyers, mental patient, etc had something to do with the story, but I certainly didn't put two and two together and was pleasently surprised by the ending. I think a lot of twist endings fail miserably because the twist was just put in there for shits and giggles and really makes no sense, but personally I think Identity was done really well and with repeat viewings, like The Sixth Sense, it's much easier to figure out what's going on if you look at the clues.

LOL, I don't think in my entire posting history here, anyone has ever agreed with me on anything. Needless to say, plenty of people were very unhappy with the ending.

Trance97
04-18-12, 12:59 PM
Donnie Darko
American Psycho
Click

Matthew Chmiel
04-18-12, 02:42 PM
In regards to American Psycho (as it's a complete piece of shit compared to the original source material):

The book and the film follow similar beats for the most part in regards to the third act, for example, in the original novel:

When Bateman's sanity starts to deteriorate, he calls his attorney confessing to all of his crimes. However, the attorney takes it all as a joke and Bateman isn't charged for any of his crimes despite numerous witnesses.

Bateman decides to confront the attorney in which he continues to brush it off as a sick joke. The attorney calls him a coward and mentions how he just had dinner with Paul Owen in London a few days ago. Bateman goes back to Owen's apartment where he previously murdered him (alongside the two prostitutes later on) only to discover everything has been cleaned up. However, there's a strong odor that Bateman believes is an attempt to hide the smell of the dead bodies that were being hidden in the apartment. As he's leaving the apartment, he runs into a real estate agent who becomes immediately suspicious of Bateman's behavior.

The novel ends where it started, with Bateman spending another Friday night out with his friends.

The novel is left to interpretation, as most are split if the murders were real or imaginary based upon Ellis' commentary on the 80s yuppie culture. Like Ellis' other novels, the story exists in a world where everyone is self-obsessed and are ignorant to the people and situations that exist around them. Some may see this is as satire, others see it as a tragedy (http://www.galilean-library.org/site/index.php/page/index.html/_/essays/literatureandfilm/american-psycho-reinterpreted-r90):

His position is thus one of knowing there is a way out but being too afraid to take it. If everything is meaningless, of course, then there is no shame in not letting the balloon go simply for the sake of it. The suspicion that there is something more is what Bateman attempts, over and over, to kill – to remove the doubt that nags at him and asks why Bethany left him, a circumstance that bothers him so much that, typically, he has to murder her to make it go away. It is when things go differently that his confidence and detachment evapourate, whether trying to strangle Luis Carruthers and finding himself immobilised by not having predicted the outcome or genuinely worried that he does not know how much Tim Price makes or where he went when he disappeared down the tunnel. It is easier for Bateman to believe that nothing is of any consequence and to prove it by acting with seeming impunity than it is to face up to his emptiness on the inside and admit that Jean makes him lose control, not knowing what will happen next.

American Psycho, then, is a story about a man so afraid of the uncertainty in the world around him that he finds solace in an idea; namely, that there is no meaning and no one really cares. This at once renders him no different than anyone else and excuses his failure to take any kind of risk. Never having to worry about making his way in life, he seeks out and destroys meaning wherever he finds or suspects it to be hiding to soothe his worry that he has somehow fallen short. Faced with a friend who takes (non-violent) directions he dare not, a colleague whose sexual orientation he was unable to judge and a secretary who will love him unconditionally, he backs away, unable to cope. This fundamental inadequacy, the certainty – buried far beneath the violence – that he is scared of not knowing what will happen next, is why Bateman is trapped in the sure knowledge that there is no exit external to him to take and why he ends the book by sighing again, crushed under the realisation that he will have to find the answers within himself.

The book is a tragedy, not a satire.
Ellis' intent is not to focus on if the murders were real or made up in Bateman's mind, it's commentary on society as a whole. If the novel is in fact a tragedy, than yes, Bateman committed the crimes.

The film tries to explain things more than the novel leading to people obsessing over the fact if the crimes were real or not by over-exaggerating some moments like Bateman trying to feed a cat to the ATM and the overly-action movie-eseque cop shootout.

In the film, when Bateman phones his attorney, he has to leave a message on voicemail confessing to the murders. When he sees his attorney the following day, the attorney sees it as a sick joke because he confuses Bateman as a colleague. While it hits home to Ellis' commentary that everyone is so self-obsessed they forget who the people around them are, it plays with the fact that Bateman has gone off the deep end.

However, the scene where Bateman visits <s>Paul Owen's</s> Paul Allen's apartment is played out in a similar fashion to the novel. The real estate agent might know that Bateman murdered Paul and others at the apartment. Society, or in this case the landlord and/or others, has cleaned up Bateman's crimes in order to keep everything moving.

Either way, the film fails to ask (or answer) the questions that Ellis posed in the original source material.

Q: What questions do you think she answered that she shouldn't have? Whether or not this was all in Patrick Bateman's head?

A: Right. And a movie automatically says, "It's real." Then, at the end, it tries to have it both ways by suggesting that it wasn't. Which you could argue is interesting, but I think it basically confused a lot of people, and I think even Mary would admit that.

In which she does! The director and screenwriter disagree with the interpretation the film is a "dream" and that everything is real.

One thing I think is a failure on my part is people keep coming out of the film thinking that its all a dream, and I never intended that. All I wanted was to be ambiguous in the way that the book was. I think it's a failure of mine in the final scene because I just got the emphasis wrong. I should have left it more open ended. It makes it look like it was all in his head, and as far as I'm concerned, it's not.

It's ambiguous in the novel whether or not it's real, or how much of it is real, and we decided, right off the bat, first conversation about the book, that we hate movies, books, stories that ended and 'it was all a dream' or 'it was all in his head'. Like Boxing Helena, there's just a lot of stuff like that. And so we really set out, and we failed, and we've acknowledged this to each other, we really set out to make it really clear that he was really killing these people, that this was really happening. What's funny is that I've had endless conversations with people who know that I wrote this script saying "So, me and my friends were arguing, cause I know it was all a dream", or "I know it really happened". And I always tell them, in our minds it really happened. What starts to happen as the movie progresses is that what you're seeing is what's going on in his head. So when he shoots a car and it explodes, even he for a second is like "Huh?" because even he is starting to believe that his perception of reality cannot be right. As he goes more crazy, what you actually see becomes more distorted and harder to figure out, but it's meant to be that he is really killing all these people, it's just that he's probably not as nicely dressed, it probably didn't go as smoothly as he is perceiving it to go, the hookers probably weren't as hot etc etc etc It's just Bateman's fantasy world. And I've turned to Mary many times and said "We've failed, we didn't write the script that we intended to write."
To say the ending is a dream is most likely false.

TL;DR: Read the book instead. No wonder Ellis is open to another adaptation of his novel.

Hokeyboy
04-18-12, 03:03 PM
The book and the film follow similar beats for the most part in regards to the third act, for example, in the original novel:

When Bateman's sanity starts to deteriorate, he calls his attorney confessing to all of his crimes. However, the attorney takes it all as a joke and Bateman isn't charged for any of his crimes despite numerous witnesses.

Bateman decides to confront the attorney in which he continues to brush it off as a sick joke. The attorney calls him a coward and mentions how he just had dinner with Paul Owen in London a few days ago. Bateman goes back to Owen's apartment where he previously murdered him (alongside the two prostitutes later on) only to discover everything has been cleaned up. However, there's a strong odor that Bateman believes is an attempt to hide the smell of the dead bodies that were being hidden in the apartment. As he's leaving the apartment, he runs into a real estate agent who becomes immediately suspicious of Bateman's behavior.

The novel ends where it started, with Bateman spending another Friday night out with his friends.

The novel is left to interpretation, as most are split if the murders were real or imaginary based upon Ellis' commentary on the 80s yuppie culture. Like Ellis' other novels, the story exists in a world where everyone is self-obsessed and are ignorant to the people and situations that exist around them. Some may see this is as satire, others see it as a tragedy (http://www.galilean-library.org/site/index.php/page/index.html/_/essays/literatureandfilm/american-psycho-reinterpreted-r90):
His position is thus one of knowing there is a way out but being too afraid to take it. If everything is meaningless, of course, then there is no shame in not letting the balloon go simply for the sake of it. The suspicion that there is something more is what Bateman attempts, over and over, to kill to remove the doubt that nags at him and asks why Bethany left him, a circumstance that bothers him so much that, typically, he has to murder her to make it go away. It is when things go differently that his confidence and detachment evapourate, whether trying to strangle Luis Carruthers and finding himself immobilised by not having predicted the outcome or genuinely worried that he does not know how much Tim Price makes or where he went when he disappeared down the tunnel. It is easier for Bateman to believe that nothing is of any consequence and to prove it by acting with seeming impunity than it is to face up to his emptiness on the inside and admit that Jean makes him lose control, not knowing what will happen next.

American Psycho, then, is a story about a man so afraid of the uncertainty in the world around him that he finds solace in an idea; namely, that there is no meaning and no one really cares. This at once renders him no different than anyone else and excuses his failure to take any kind of risk. Never having to worry about making his way in life, he seeks out and destroys meaning wherever he finds or suspects it to be hiding to soothe his worry that he has somehow fallen short. Faced with a friend who takes (non-violent) directions he dare not, a colleague whose sexual orientation he was unable to judge and a secretary who will love him unconditionally, he backs away, unable to cope. This fundamental inadequacy, the certainty buried far beneath the violence that he is scared of not knowing what will happen next, is why Bateman is trapped in the sure knowledge that there is no exit external to him to take and why he ends the book by sighing again, crushed under the realisation that he will have to find the answers within himself.

The book is a tragedy, not a satire.


Ellis' intent is not to focus on if the murders were real or made up in Bateman's mind, it's commentary on society as a whole. If the novel is in fact a tragedy, than yes, Bateman committed the crimes.

The film tries to explain things more than the novel leading to people obsessing over the fact if the crimes were real or not by over-exaggerating some moments like Bateman trying to feed a cat to the ATM and the overly-action movie-eseque cop shootout.

In the film, when Bateman phones his attorney, he has to leave a message on voicemail confessing to the murders. When he sees his attorney the following day, the attorney sees it as a sick joke because he confuses Bateman as a colleague. While it hits home to Ellis' commentary that everyone is so self-obsessed they forget who the people around them are, it plays with the fact that Bateman has gone off the deep end.

However, the scene where Bateman visits <s>Paul Owen's</s> Paul Allen's apartment is played out in a similar fashion to the novel. The real estate agent might know that Bateman murdered Paul and others at the apartment. Society, or in this case the landlord and/or others, has cleaned up Bateman's crimes in order to keep everything moving.

Either way, the film fails to ask (or answer) the questions that Ellis posed in the original source material.

Q: What questions do you think she answered that she shouldn't have? Whether or not this was all in Patrick Bateman's head?

A: Right. And a movie automatically says, "It's real." Then, at the end, it tries to have it both ways by suggesting that it wasn't. Which you could argue is interesting, but I think it basically confused a lot of people, and I think even Mary would admit that.
In which she does! The director and screenwriter disagree with the interpretation the film is a "dream" and that everything is real.
One thing I think is a failure on my part is people keep coming out of the film thinking that its all a dream, and I never intended that. All I wanted was to be ambiguous in the way that the book was. I think it's a failure of mine in the final scene because I just got the emphasis wrong. I should have left it more open ended. It makes it look like it was all in his head, and as far as I'm concerned, it's not.
It's ambiguous in the novel whether or not it's real, or how much of it is real, and we decided, right off the bat, first conversation about the book, that we hate movies, books, stories that ended and 'it was all a dream' or 'it was all in his head'. Like Boxing Helena, there's just a lot of stuff like that. And so we really set out, and we failed, and we've acknowledged this to each other, we really set out to make it really clear that he was really killing these people, that this was really happening. What's funny is that I've had endless conversations with people who know that I wrote this script saying "So, me and my friends were arguing, cause I know it was all a dream", or "I know it really happened". And I always tell them, in our minds it really happened. What starts to happen as the movie progresses is that what you're seeing is what's going on in his head. So when he shoots a car and it explodes, even he for a second is like "Huh?" because even he is starting to believe that his perception of reality cannot be right. As he goes more crazy, what you actually see becomes more distorted and harder to figure out, but it's meant to be that he is really killing all these people, it's just that he's probably not as nicely dressed, it probably didn't go as smoothly as he is perceiving it to go, the hookers probably weren't as hot etc etc etc It's just Bateman's fantasy world. And I've turned to Mary many times and said "We've failed, we didn't write the script that we intended to write."




http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b281/hokeyboy/DIDNTREADPAPASAN.jpg

Ash Ketchum
04-18-12, 03:15 PM
DEAD OF NIGHT (1945), an early (but not the first) horror anthology film.

Matthew Chmiel
04-18-12, 03:41 PM
Hokeyboy:

http://i.imgur.com/Vz8Uo.jpg

Learn how to use the internet, for example:

http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/000/154/912/berneydidnotread.gif

Hokeyboy
04-18-12, 04:21 PM
Hokeyboy:
Learn how to use the internet, for example:

http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/000/154/912/berneydidnotread.gif
Oh please. I used that one centuries ago (http://forum.dvdtalk.com/other-talk/598123-cowardly-men-abandon-sinking-cruise-ship-like-george-costanzo-fleeing-fire-2.html#post11079348). :lol:

wd40cloud
04-18-12, 05:19 PM
Vanilla Sky

digidoh
04-18-12, 06:40 PM
The various adaptations of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (sometimes Wonderland movies combine elements from both books).

And the film noir
The Woman in the Window.
I was actually relieved that it had been a dream.

How about movies that half of it was a dream (delusion?) like
Fight Club?

KaBluie
04-20-12, 02:26 AM
>Sister Emanuelle<