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View Full Version : How many of your family members share your interest in comics?


The Bus
03-25-12, 05:37 AM
I tried to get my siblings into it without much success. They do read and like the graphic novels I (usually) give them as a Christmas gift.

The European side of my family does appreciate Belgian stuff (<i>Asterix</i>, <i>Lucky Luke</i>) but no dice on any American stuff, superhero or otherwise.

stingermck
03-25-12, 08:11 AM
zero.

I can talk to my dad about the collecting/investment side of it, but thats about it.

Bronkster
03-25-12, 11:24 AM
zero.

I can talk to my dad about the collecting/investment side of it, but thats about it.
That's about the same for me.

kgrogers1979
03-25-12, 12:42 PM
zero.

Ditto

Supermallet
03-25-12, 12:51 PM
Most of my friends are into comics. I have one good friend who has practically the exact same taste in comics that I do, so we can recommend comics to each other.

movie diva
03-25-12, 01:38 PM
My mom got me in to reading comics, and my best friend and some of my friends read comics, my ex-husband is/was in to comics.

ivelostr2
03-25-12, 07:18 PM
No one in my family is in to comics except for me. Sometimes, if it relates to a move, they will call me and ask a question or tell me they liked something and it will spark a conversation, but they really could care less about the comics...my brother called me the other day and said, "tell me about the green lantern." So i went into like a 10 minute explanation of the character and the what has been going on lately in the books...then he said, "so which guy was Seth Rogen in this movie I'm about to watch?" ...:sad:...then i had to explain who the Green Hornet was.

Occasionally I will talk to my wife about a comic if there is something that excites me and she listens just to humor me, but she couldn't really care less.
Briefly, my niece was into Wonder Woman and I took the opportunity to get her into the JLU cartoons and toys and she used to call me at random times to ask who Booster Gold was or why there were different people in the Flash costume, but she grew out of it around the age of 8.

kgrogers1979
03-25-12, 08:15 PM
No one in my family is in to comics except for me. Sometimes, if it relates to a move, they will call me and ask a question or tell me they liked something and it will spark a conversation, but they really could care less about the comics...my brother called me the other day and said, "tell me about the green lantern." So i went into like a 10 minute explanation of the character and the what has been going on lately in the books...then he said, "so which guy was Seth Rogen in this movie I'm about to watch?" ...:sad:...then i had to explain who the Green Hornet was.

Occasionally I will talk to my wife about a comic if there is something that excites me and she listens just to humor me, but she could really care less.
Briefly, my niece was into Wonder Woman and I took the opportunity to get her into the JLU cartoons and toys and she used to call me at random times to ask who Booster Gold was or why there were different people in the Flash costume, but she grew out of it around the age of 8.


:hairpull: :hairpull: :hairpull: @ bolded



http://img14.imageshack.us/img14/3225/carelesss.png

ivelostr2
03-25-12, 08:28 PM
:hairpull: :hairpull: :hairpull: @ bolded



http://img14.imageshack.us/img14/3225/carelesss.png

Fixed.
I can't believe I did it. I don't get much sleep around here recently...

Timber
03-25-12, 09:55 PM
Zero point zero.

Lastdaysofrain
03-26-12, 07:23 AM
Zero

Trevor
03-26-12, 07:58 AM
Zero.

A couple friends over the course of my life, but never enough to make it seem like a "cool" hobby.

davidh777
03-26-12, 10:52 AM
My parents are familiar with Tintin and watched some episodes of the Canadian series recently with me. Don't think they read many of the books, however.

My sister liked the Harvey stuff and borrowed by Dark Horse compilation for a while. Her kids read that and will read my Archie and Uncle Scrooge when they visit.

My kids will read Peanuts, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, and a few other things.

Wife will just shake her head disapprovingly.

fumanstan
03-26-12, 11:03 AM
My brother has a light interest. He doesn't read that many comics, but is familiar with all the characters and big story arcs and likes the animated shows from DC and Marvel, as well as the movies obviously.

PhantomStranger
03-26-12, 10:35 PM
Zero for me, the comic books industry has had little mainstream appeal during most of our lives. I think for most people the existence of comics vanished once they were removed from newsstands. I still remember in the 80's when local grocery stores stopped carrying them at all. The only time I ever saw anyone else interested in comics was at a convention or a comic book store.

Trevor
03-27-12, 08:23 AM
Zero for me, the comic books industry has had little mainstream appeal during most of our lives. I think for most people the existence of comics vanished once they were removed from newsstands. I still remember in the 80's when local grocery stores stopped carrying them at all. The only time I ever saw anyone else interested in comics was at a convention or a comic book store.
I miss the 70s and early 80s when I could walk 5 blocks and hit 10 stores with comic books.

DC and Marvel should put out some $1-2 comics for grocery and drug stores. Get the product back in the kids hands and get young readers hooked early. Of course, people have been saying this for years, and it seems too obvious, so the must be good reasons why it can't happen.

madcougar
03-27-12, 11:26 AM
My son (who's 11), likes to read my comics. He's gone through good chunks of my Spider-Man books over the last few years. But even though he has literally thousands of books at his disposal, he isn't crazy about them. I sometimes laugh and think to myself "what would I have done if I discovered my dad had a huge collection of comic books when I was a kid?"

kgrogers1979
03-27-12, 12:01 PM
DC and Marvel should put out some $1-2 comics for grocery and drug stores. Get the product back in the kids hands and get young readers hooked early.

I agree.

If it wasn't for newsstands at the grocery store, I very likely never would have gotten into comics. I grew up watching Adam West Batman re-runs in the 80s, but I didn't know what a comic book was, and my town didn't even get an LCS until 1991. One day in 1988 while my mom was shopping for groceries, I happened to notice a Batman comic at the newsstand, and that's where my comic addiction started.

davidh777
03-27-12, 12:11 PM
I had given up on the X-Men as a reprint magazine until I saw #94 on the shelf of my drugstore. I bought it, then had to seek out Giant-Size #1.

Fortunately I do have a few friends who know Watchmen and a few other titles like that. What was kind of a shock was meeting someone at work who knew way more than I did about this stuff. First time I could chat with anyone about Y The Last Man.

The Valeyard
03-27-12, 01:26 PM
Less than zero. My family tolerates my hobby.

Most of my friends won't even step into a comic store because they think they're skeevy. Any comic pal I have are really just online acquaintances.

I am alone. :(

madcougar
03-27-12, 01:57 PM
I miss the 70s and early 80s when I could walk 5 blocks and hit 10 stores with comic books.

DC and Marvel should put out some $1-2 comics for grocery and drug stores. Get the product back in the kids hands and get young readers hooked early. Of course, people have been saying this for years, and it seems too obvious, so the must be good reasons why it can't happen.

Good times... I had a UtoteM about two blocks from my house growing up. I would go in there with a dollar and would walk out with candy and a comic book. Being pretty young, I really didn't have any idea what I was buying. All I knew is that Spider-Man was on the cover. But to expand on your point, I remember I was actually buying an Amazing Spider-Man reprint that included two stories from the 60s. But since it was just pennies more than what I guess were new comics, I happily bought them. I must have had about 100 books when we moved at some point and the box with my collection disappeared. :(

PhantomStranger
03-27-12, 03:33 PM
For most people older than 30 I imagine their first exposure to comics had to have been at a non-comics store. The first issues I ever received were from the comics sold at 7-Eleven, a convenience store, when my parents would go in to pick up a quick snack. I begged them for a Flash issue that had a cool cover.

Philzilla
03-27-12, 04:41 PM
zero.

I can talk to my dad about the collecting/investment side of it, but thats about it.

same here

Trevor
03-27-12, 04:56 PM
For most people older than 30 I imagine their first exposure to comics had to have been at a non-comics store. The first issues I ever received were from the comics sold at 7-Eleven, a convenience store, when my parents would go in to pick up a quick snack. I begged them for a Flash issue that had a cool cover.
I probably had earlier exposure to comics (they were literally everywhere back when I was a kid), but my earliest memories of them also involve 7-11 stores.

I think I first really got hooked on them back at the tale end of the 20 cents an issue days. I mainly loved DC books like Plop! (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plop!) and House of Mystery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_mystery) and the DC super-heroes, although I bought some Marvels too. Even occasionally bought Dells and Harveys and Acmes and the other "independents" of that day.

I would get my weekly(?) allowance of a dollar, and ride my bike to the local 7-11 for 5 comic books. Man, I miss those days.

davidh777
03-27-12, 05:08 PM
I would get my weekly(?) allowance of a dollar, and ride my bike to the local 7-11 for 5 comic books. Man, I miss those days.

Except don't you make $30 an hour now rather than a buck a week? :)

Trevor
03-27-12, 05:24 PM
Except don't you make $30 an hour now rather than a buck a week? :)

True. But I more miss the carefree days of no job or responsibility of any kind!

But back to $/comic stuff, I still can't get over the inflation on these things. I know I've brought this up a few times in earlier threads, but...

The average hour of salary in the mid 70s of ~$4.50 would buy ~18 comic books. Today's average of ~$20 would buy ~7 comic books.

Adjusted for inflation we're close to even to where we were back then salary wise, and I'm not sure what that does to my rough numbers up there.

mrhan
03-27-12, 06:21 PM
I probably had earlier exposure to comics (they were literally everywhere back when I was a kid), but my earliest memories of them also involve 7-11 stores.

I think I first really got hooked on them back at the tale end of the 20 cents an issue days.

I would get my weekly(?) allowance of a dollar, and ride my bike to the local 7-11 for 5 comic books. Man, I miss those days.

Same here. I know it was the summer of '73. I had more DC than Marvel because DC stayed at 20c a lot longer than Marvel. More bang for the buck. My 2 brothers also collected and when they stopped I ended up with their collections. I still collect GA, SA and BA books but only read TPBs now.

Travis McClain
05-09-12, 09:26 AM
I shared my tale of woe about failing to get my nephew to read in a thread I started a while back ("What to Do About Kids Not Wanting to Read?" (http://forum.dvdtalk.com/comic-book-talk/594149-what-do-about-kids-not-wanting-read.html)), where we shared our collective nostalgia for being able to buy comics outside the direct market in our youth and our frustration that's no longer the case.

My uncle was big into comics from what I'm told, though he drowned as a teen before I was born. I've often wondered what kind of influence he would have been on me, including as a comic book reader. All my life, I've heard how similar to him I am in personality and taste. He collaborated on a comic book with a friend of his. It gives me chills just to think about it; it's called "On Borrow'd Time" and it's about a guy who climbs out of the sea having drowned and then becomes a superhero. He did this shortly before he died. It's freaky to look at it.

I tried to get my wife to read comics from time to time. The only success I ever had was with Bone. She liked that quite a bit, but I could never get her to read anything else. She expressed an interest periodically, even going so far as to ask me for recommendations and to have me set aside some things for her to read, but she never actually did.

majorjoe23
05-09-12, 10:05 AM
My wife reads comics, though she doesn't like superhero stuff (Watchmen and Sleeper were the two exceptions). But she reads Fables, Sweet Tooth, Walking Dead, DMZ, Chew and I'm sure a bunch of others I'm forgetting.

My brother and sister-in-law read Walking Dead, Tank Girl and a bunch of more underground stuff.

Other than that there are just some smaller things here and there, like my mother-in-law reading Maus and Fun Home.

Shannon Nutt
05-09-12, 02:17 PM
My wife loves superhero movies, but hates comics. Go figure. She says she can't read a story presented the way comics do it.

fujishig
05-09-12, 05:42 PM
My mom loved comic books, and as a result of that both my brother and I still collect and love them.

My wife tolerates the hobby, but won't necessarily seek it out without prompting (last thing I think she read was a volume of Yotsuba&). She did love Avengers the movie, though. I think my daughter will get into it... even though she can't read, she already loves taking manga volumes off the shelf, flipping through it (without reading it) and then putting it back in numerical order. In fact, the children's books she reads (or that are read to her) are basically single panel per page comic books anyway...

Travis McClain
05-10-12, 10:28 AM
My wife loves superhero movies, but hates comics. Go figure. She says she can't read a story presented the way comics do it.

My wife complained about that, too. She said she found the layout confusing. I thought that was laughable at first, but then I recalled that women and men have very different spatial orientations. This is why women navigate by landmarks and men by directions (i.e., north, west, etc.). It never occurred to me that this would present itself as a problem for reading comic books, but there it was.

I admit, sometimes even I have a problem with the way some pages are laid out. The worst offender so far for me was Mike Avon Oeming's work on Powers. There were frequently two-page spreads where I wasn't sure whether to read all the way across the top and then work my way down, or to make my way down each column.

fujishig
05-10-12, 11:28 AM
I don't think it's just a difference between women and men. For those who grew up with comic books, following panel by panel is pretty easy because we were trained at a pretty early age; it's something we sometimes take for granted. And you're right, some artists can have some confusing layouts (try Bachalo, for instance). Maybe when we're younger it's easier for us to learn, maybe because we're interested we plow through it and learn on our own, I dunno, but it doesn't necessarily come naturally (though a good artist who has a good page flow can make the transitions much, much easier).

I think it's similar to video game fans, who take for granted that a keyboard and mouse or a console controller are easy to use; they're not, we're just used to them.

The Bus
05-24-12, 01:58 AM
My wife complained about that, too. She said she found the layout confusing. I thought that was laughable at first, but then I recalled that women and men have very different spatial orientations. This is why women navigate by landmarks and men by directions (i.e., north, west, etc.). It never occurred to me that this would present itself as a problem for reading comic books, but there it was.

I admit, sometimes even I have a problem with the way some pages are laid out. The worst offender so far for me was Mike Avon Oeming's work on Powers. There were frequently two-page spreads where I wasn't sure whether to read all the way across the top and then work my way down, or to make my way down each column.

Even with something like <b>Bone</b>?

I think subject matter is important too. In film terms, there's very, very few "four quadrant" comic books.

Travis McClain
05-24-12, 11:00 AM
Even with something like <b>Bone</b>?

I think subject matter is important too. In film terms, there's very, very few "four quadrant" comic books.

Bone, she could follow. Even that, though, had its moments where she would have to re-read a panel or even a page from time to time.

mrhan
05-24-12, 12:52 PM
My wife loves superhero movies, but hates comics. Go figure. She says she can't read a story presented the way comics do it.

Maybe you should introduce her to some manga. My wife doesn't really read comics but she loved Crying Freeman. She said it felt like a movie. Well, obviously it's drawn out like a storyboard but she didn't know that.