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View Full Version : What do you think was the greatest advancement in video games this generation?


Decker
01-30-12, 01:55 AM
I was thinking about this today as we near the end of this generation of hardware : Two generations ago (the PS1/N64 era) it the most revolutionary change in consoles had to be polygons. It allowed you to play games in 3D space. You could have 3D platformers like Mario 3D and Spyro, you could have 3D shooters like Syphon Filter and moved fighting games out of the 2D plane with Tekken and Virtua Fighter. I'd put analog controls as the #2 advancement that generation. Last Generation (Xbox, PS2, Gamecube) you had two major ones. The debate will rage about whether it was online play or open-world, sandbox gaming. Personally I'd go with open world gaming because even though online gaming changed consoles forever, it had existed on the PC for years before the Xbox came out.

This generation there could be a few choices. Certainly HD graphics were important for keeping up with home theater technology. Another reasonable but controversial choice would be motion control gaming, though it may be debated for eons about whether that was a good or bad thing.
As for me, the conclusion I came up with was a bit of a surprise to me : I think the greatest advancement in gaming was actually Achievements. The reason I say that is because it actually changed the way we game. No longer were we playing just to see the ending or get a high score or to maybe unlock a new mode, we played to unlock those remaining achievements. Instead of just blasting through a level, we might try to spring a trap and cause a series of events in hopes of popping an Achievement. Even though I personally don't know or care about my 'gamerscore" there's something undeniably cool about unlocking a difficult or even a surprise Achievement. It took Sony a few years, but they caught on as well, even advancing things by stratifying their trophy system so that you couldn't just pad things with more, easy to get Achievements. If you got a Platinum Trophy, you had earned it. Playing Wii games feels a little off for me now without that system in place. On some strange level, sometimes while playing a Wii game, I find myself thinking "Why didn't I get an Achievement for that?" after a boss fight or at the end of a level. Even Steam took the Achievement idea and ran with it (which, to the best of my knowledge, is the first time in ages that a console gaming concept was copied and adopted by the PC gaming world rather than the other way around). Anyway, that was my opinion. Curious about other people's thoughts on the subject.

Sub-Zero
01-30-12, 02:40 AM
I never thought about Achievements in terms of an advancement to this generation's gaming, but you bring up a good point. However, for me, Achievements are nice when I'm finished playing the game, but don't change how I play the game. On the other hand, motion controls really changed gaming for me. For example, the other day I played Resident Evil 4 (Wii Edition) and then played Resident Evil 5 on the 360 and I noticed how much I appreciated motion controls. With the Wii Remote, I could easily aim and hit every target, while on the 360 I occasionally had difficulty aiming all of my shots quickly after being spoiled by motion controls. Also, while the Achievements on RE5 were nice, they only popped up on my screen for a few seconds, which for me didn't add anything to the game itself, while the Wii Remote made playing RE4 much more enjoyable. So in my humble opinion, motion controls are the greatest advancement in video games this generation.

MoviePage
01-30-12, 03:16 AM
I agree with achievements. They have almost completely changed both my approach to gaming in general and the way I play specific games, mostly for the better.

kgrogers1979
01-30-12, 03:50 AM
Polygons existed before the PS1/N64 era. The SNES had a few polygonal games, like Star Fox for example.

If you want to say online game wasn't revolutionary since it had already existed on PC for many years prior, then so did open-ended sandbox games. PC had open-ended games all the way back in the 90s with the likes of the original Fallout and Elder Scrolls and Baldur's Gate games and other classic CRPGs. Likewise HD graphics have existed for a long time on PCs since monitors are inherently much higher res than a TV.

I do agree about Achievements being a big advancement, and was actually something that didn't exist in PC gaming prior. Although Achievements are somewhat similar to arcade games of the 80s in which people played for the high score. Today people play for the high Achievements.

foxdvd
01-30-12, 07:40 AM
achievements...like them or hate them they have changed the way many play games...

My own personal evolution when it comes to achievements is actually fun to think about. Going back at my gaming history you can see how little I cared about them at the start. Slowly over the last 3 years you can see how I started to go out of my way to get them. Then I started to play games on hard when there was an achievement tied to them. In a weird way they made me a better gamer...even if my reflexes have slowed. I still will not go out of my way to grind out achievements...or play a game more than once if I did not have fun with it (happens a lot where I play a game on normal thinking I will play again on hard, and just get bored)...

but achievements have made me try out every weapon in a game...play on the hardest difficulty...try to go whole levels without dying (and thus put a level of excitement on this that would not have been there before)...go for headshots....try to find hidden items....do every side mission....and overall made playing games even better...


Of course there are those games in which achievements have kept me from playing them. I have avoided games that would only net me 100 achievement points unless I put 300 hours and 10 complete games into...

Michael Corvin
01-30-12, 07:53 AM
Achievements... undeniably. I was always someone who explored to find every last collectible. If a game clearly wants me to turn right, I go left. When I start a level I go backward instead of forward. There's always something to find. Designers are so predictable. :lol:

Tying achievements to something I was already doing was great. Now I have a record of all the useless crap I find in games. The difference now is that instead of doing the crazy shit in games I love, I now do it in nearly every game.

Kedrix
01-30-12, 08:31 AM
Achievements and Patches.

Achievements for all of the reasons explained here but most importantly, they changed the way we play games. No longer is it just about beating the game...it's about beating the shit out of a game in so many different ways.

Patches, it used to be if a game was broken, it was well broken. Now with updates and bug fixes, a broken game at launch can at least be salvaged into something playable in several patches. And annoying errors that were present and never go away with older titles, actually go away in most games.

Michael Corvin
01-30-12, 08:54 AM
Patches are a double edged sword. I think more games are glitchy and problematic because companies know they can fix it later. Gotta rush that game out the door! If the game fails to sell? It remains glitchy as hell just like they always have.

starman9000
01-30-12, 09:16 AM
I just wish it was easier to track which games have been fixed properly with patches.

I'll go with the unpopular idea of motion controllers, I get it with achievements, but that hasn't really changed much for my style of gaming. The Kinect and Wii have made gaming a family affair for me, with 3-68 year olds participating.

I would indeed go for online play for the last gen, sure I'd been doing that in some means on the PC for years, but online console gaming is pretty great for a mostly (now) casual gamer. Being able to log on and play with old friends from around the country is one of the main reasons I play.

mattysemo247
01-30-12, 09:45 AM
Since it seems like everyone is going with Achievements, I’m going to go in a new direction and say online connectivity. The original PS2 required an additional add on and the first X Box wasn’t nearly set up for anything other than simple online matchmaking. With the new systems we have online stores, bigger hard drives to purchase games online, lobby systems, extensive friend systems and so on. I’m also curious to see if Sony is going to continue offering their online service for free with the next system and what Microsoft has in store for theirs.

RichC2
01-30-12, 09:45 AM
I'm going with the advancements in online gaming for a console. Sure it isn't new in the grand scheme of things (I played Quake I/II a ridiculous amount back in the day, and multiplayer Doom before that) but the ease, layout and focus on it this generation easily outweighs anything else, especially on the X360.

General online integration like level sharing in LittleBigPlanet, co-op in Gears of War, free for alls in Call of Duty, etc; are incredibly well implemented this time around.

Motion Control outside of some fitness and dancing games has been a flop to me, it's like 3D - it was neat at first, but the novelty wore off and it just needs to go away.

Decker
01-30-12, 09:57 AM
Speaking of double-edged swords, how about DLC? Of course it's frustrating when you look at a list of available of DLC from a Madden (http://marketplace.xbox.com/en-US/Product/Madden-NFL-11/66acd000-77fe-1000-9115-d802454108fe?downloadType=GameAddon&noSplash=1) game and see how they try to nickle-and-dime you on a $60 game you already own. It almost pains me to look at the store pages of iOS games since it seems all they want to do is collect microtransactions again and again. And the whole "Project $10" is another unfortunate by-product of the ability to sell DLC.
On the other hand, games that were completed and well received like Fallout 3 and Borderlands were able to significantly extend their experiences by offering DLC. For fans of those games, it was a very welcome addition and certainly something not possible on previous generations of consoles, barring the release of a sequel.
Think about it : When Guitar Hero came out for the PS2 in 2005 it had 47 songs, all the well known ones were covers. You then had a year of playing and learning those songs, but that was it.
Rock Band came out just two years later in November 2007 and since then, every week for over four years there has been new content to play, over 2000 additional songs. It has almost obviated the need for sequels. That's a pretty significant advancement, even if it's certainly got its downsides as well.

Raul3
01-30-12, 10:12 AM
Yeah, achievements is the main one.

I would say advanced online play with Xbox Live. Yes, we had online play in the PC years before that, and we even had a version of Xbox Live in the original Xbox, but Xbox Live with the Xbox 360 was an evolution, a big step ahead. It forced Sony to make a lot of changes to the PSN even when they though they were done with it.

Michael Corvin
01-30-12, 10:24 AM
The problem I have with picking Live or DLC is that the original Xbox had them both. Sure the original Live didn't have near the social impact of the 360, but for the basics it was solid. Same goes for DLC. It was rudimentary but it obviously laid the groundwork for what would come later.

Xbox Live with the Xbox 360 was an evolution, a big step ahead. It forced Sony to make a lot of changes to the PSN even when they though they were done with it.

It makes you look back and wonder if Sony honestly thought they could put out their version of Live and brush their hands of it(it kinda felt like it). The continual advancement of Live must have been a fucking thorn in that plan.

fumanstan
01-30-12, 11:07 AM
Online gaming is out because its nothing new, and I don't like the idea of picking motion controls because the number of games that are actually enhanced by it aren't particularly high.

Achievements are a good one, as it spread to all platforms.

Decker
01-30-12, 11:10 AM
Achievements are a good one, as it spread to all platforms.

http://www.examiner.com/images/blog/EXID7161/images/wii.jpg

fumanstan
01-30-12, 11:14 AM
Almost :lol:

fujishig
01-30-12, 11:21 AM
Maybe it's because I'm not a huge achievement guy, but that's pretty sad if achievements are the consensus "greatest enhancement in video games this generation." Especially when there's not really a standard to give them any meaning from game to game (outside of perhaps Platinums on PS3).

I do think things like 3d gaming and motion controls, which are pretty much in their infancy this generation, may become bigger in the next. We'll see.

Are we counting the iphone/ipod touch in this conversation? Because the proliferation of cheap (or free) games on the go is certainly a big one, and a huge shift in the portable market, and perhaps related to that smaller, downloadable games for consoles like XBLA or PSN or minis. Or the Facebook games, which I believe pioneered in-app purchases for Farmville-like games, which I guess works as a viable alternative for companies to make money (instead of all on the initial purchase).

slop101
01-30-12, 11:24 AM
Fuck achievements. Seriously. Biggest advancement this gen, for me: wireless controllers!

fumanstan
01-30-12, 11:25 AM
XBLA and PSN arcade games is a good one.

Michael Corvin
01-30-12, 11:25 AM
Maybe it's because I'm not a huge achievement guy, but that's pretty sad if achievements are the consensus "greatest enhancement in video games this generation." Especially when there's not really a standard to give them any meaning from game to game (outside of perhaps Platinums on PS3).


They essentially revived that arcade leaderboard mentality which had been missing for at least a decade.

Michael Corvin
01-30-12, 11:26 AM
Fuck achievements. Seriously. Biggest advancement this gen, for me: wireless controllers!

http://www.lukiegames.com/assets/images/gc/accessories/gc_wavebird_wireless_controller_plat.jpg

Noonan
01-30-12, 11:59 AM
Standard wireless controllers and the on-line ecosystem.

slop101
01-30-12, 11:59 AM
^ too little too late. It also came out no long before the 360, so it kinda goes under this gen.

kefrank
01-30-12, 12:04 PM
Polygons existed before the PS1/N64 era. The SNES had a few polygonal games, like Star Fox for example.
True, but the polygonal capability was in the Super FX chip in the cartridge itself and not a direct capability of the console. I'd hardly consider that an innovation of that generation's hardware.

Michael Corvin
01-30-12, 12:09 PM
^ too little too late. It also came out no long before the 360, so it kinda goes under this gen.

The Gamecube came out 11/01. The Wavebird came out six months later. That's 3.5 years before the 360.

So no, it doesn't fall under this gen. :) The Wavebird was in a class of it's own.

starman9000
01-30-12, 12:44 PM
When did the first xbox wireless controllers come out? Seems like I had a few of those, though they were pretty crappy 3rd party ones.

Noonan
01-30-12, 12:45 PM
MS didn't make one until the 360.

starman9000
01-30-12, 12:45 PM
They essentially revived that arcade leaderboard mentality which had been missing for at least a decade.

So it's another innovation that fits under the online capabilities umbrella? :)

orangecrush
01-30-12, 01:15 PM
Since it seems like everyone is going with Achievements, Iím going to go in a new direction and say online connectivity. The original PS2 required an additional add on and the first X Box wasnít nearly set up for anything other than simple online matchmaking. With the new systems we have online stores, bigger hard drives to purchase games online, lobby systems, extensive friend systems and so on. I agree 100%. Without the assumption that the majority of their customers would have persistent internet connections, achievements wouldn't have been integrated like they have been. The implementation of DLC, arcade games, digital distribution of retail games and so many other things I love about the current generation is all made possible by internet connections.

orangecrush
01-30-12, 01:20 PM
http://www.lukiegames.com/assets/images/gc/accessories/gc_wavebird_wireless_controller_plat.jpgI assume that slop meant that wireless controllers were standard. The NES had a 3rd party wireless controller.

fujishig
01-30-12, 01:46 PM
The wavebird was a first party wireless controller, though.

Michael Corvin
01-30-12, 01:49 PM
I'd speculate that we'd still be tethered this gen if it weren't for the Wavebird.

Decker
01-30-12, 01:49 PM
I agree 100%. Without the assumption that the majority of their customers would have persistent internet connections, achievements wouldn't have been integrated like they have been. The implementation of DLC, arcade games, digital distribution of retail games and so many other things I love about the current generation is all made possible by internet connections.

Internet connectivity, better graphics, wireless controllers and even motion controls were all evolutionary changes. All were present before this gen (heck, I had a Microsoft gyroscopic controller to play a motorcycle game on the PC last century). I picked Achievements since they were a completely new concept : In-game rewards for doing different things in-game during gameplay that add to an aggregate score associated with your gamertag. I didn't get the appeal at first (and many still don't), but it's undeniable that this concept and its execution was really the biggest innovation, I think it lead to the most permanent change in gaming this generation.

orangecrush
01-30-12, 01:50 PM
The wavebird was a first party wireless controller, though.Sure, but it wasn't packed in. This is the first generation where wireless controllers were packed in w/ the majority of all 3 systems (I think that some of the core 360s came w/ wired).

mhg83
01-30-12, 02:10 PM
I picked Achievements since they were a completely new concept : In-game rewards for doing different things in-game during gameplay that add to an aggregate score associated with your gamertag. I didn't get the appeal at first (and many still don't), but it's undeniable that this concept and its execution was really the biggest innovation, I think it lead to the most permanent change in gaming this generation.

Achievements are not a new concept. The Ratchet and Clank games started doing achievments on the PS2.

starseed1981
01-30-12, 02:19 PM
I'll go against the grain here and say DLC. Its really changed the market imho. Thanks to it we have to deal with endless game of the year editions, not having the entire game via physical media, etc.

orangecrush
01-30-12, 02:53 PM
Internet connectivity, better graphics, wireless controllers and even motion controls were all evolutionary changes. All were present before this gen (heck, I had a Microsoft gyroscopic controller to play a motorcycle game on the PC last century). I picked Achievements since they were a completely new concept : In-game rewards for doing different things in-game during gameplay that add to an aggregate score associated with your gamertag. I didn't get the appeal at first (and many still don't), but it's undeniable that this concept and its execution was really the biggest innovation, I think it lead to the most permanent change in gaming this generation.You could argue that everything about this generation of consoles is evolutionary. In game rewards for achieving certain goals had been done before. It is more productive to think about the question as what things that are new in terms of wide spread implementation.

Groucho
01-30-12, 03:01 PM
Bloom

Tracer Bullet
01-30-12, 03:11 PM
The amount of quality games criticism that's developed since the mid-2000s.

cruzness
01-30-12, 03:22 PM
I'll go with the public acceptance of the online experience. Without the online communities growing on the consoles there would be no achievements, no online leaderboards, no acceptance of online DLC, no online stores, no growth of multiplayer. Yes the PC has had all this but the ease of the online experience with consoles this genration has made all these other things a possibility.

PopcornTreeCt
01-30-12, 03:32 PM
Wireless controllers is a good one. I remember I had I think about 2 different kinds for Genesis and PS2 and they both sucked bad. It wasn't until Xbox came around and got it right.

Achievements are a big thing but I think it's only a portion of the whole online profile thing that really changed everything. Now I'm really hoping with the new Xbox system that I can keep my gamertag and my gamerscore. I don't want to lose all that information.

DaveyJoe
01-30-12, 03:36 PM
I'm a total achievement whore so I'll go with that. Some may consider them to be useless but can't you use achievement points to unlock DLC on the 360? That's pretty awesome.

Michael Corvin
01-30-12, 03:38 PM
can't you use achievement points to unlock DLC on the 360?

No. They are 100% worthless.

foxdvd
01-30-12, 03:42 PM
I'm a total achievement whore so I'll go with that. Some may consider them to be useless but can't you use achievement points to unlock DLC on the 360? That's pretty awesome.

your not that good of a whore....lol


I also think a great advancement is you will never see red used to show a problem with future systems...I hate red

http://www.instructables.com/files/deriv/FIM/PM06/FBVHDX7J/FIMPM06FBVHDX7J.MEDIUM.jpg

DaveyJoe
01-30-12, 03:48 PM
No. They are 100% worthless.

Oh, I don't have a 360, I'm not sure where I got that impression. I do go out of my way to get achievements on PC games and trophies on my PS3. I got the platinum trophy for RE5, which was a game that disappointed me. I never would have touched it after beating it if it wasn't for trophies.

Drexl
01-30-12, 03:56 PM
I'm going to say digital distribution in general. Even though it may have originated prior with PC shareware and XBLA on the original Xbox, this was the generation when it became more organized (through Steam and console stores) and took off. The market had gotten to the point where it was generally expected that you have to provide a big budget, long game and sell it for $50 or more. DD allowed developers (and small developers) to make smaller games but still reach a wide audience, which fostered a comeback of 2D and more experimental fare, and it led to DLC as opposed to retail expansion packs. It also ushered in the episodic model, which I don't like but I have to acknowledge, and changed the way legacy titles are distributed.

covenant
01-30-12, 03:58 PM
Bloom

HDR :mad:

lordwow
01-30-12, 10:21 PM
A few things come to mind for me:

1) Achievements - No getting around this. We all like to brag and we all like to be rewarded for doing cool stuff. Getting 1000/1000 on COD4 is still one of my proudest gaming "achievements." This definitely helped reshape gaming.

2) Online connectivity - Buddy Lists, Current Playing, and now Beacons. I can't tell you how many times I've gone and just looked at what my friends have played lately.

3) DLC - Love it or hate it, it made "expansions" financially feasible.

4) With that, a loss of rarity - I remember having to search around to half a dozen stores to find rare games back in the day. Now almost every game is "on demand." Other than imports and such, almost nothing is hard to find anymore.

5) A shift away from strictly gaming - I use my 360 more as a Netflix player than as a gaming system. I use my PS3 more as a Blu-Ray player than as a gaming system. I use my Wii more as a dust collector than a gaming system.

Decker
01-30-12, 10:46 PM
A few things come to mind for me:


5) A shift away from strictly gaming - I use my 360 more as a Netflix player than as a gaming system. I use my PS3 more as a Blu-Ray player than as a gaming system. I use my Wii more as a dust collector than a gaming system.

Good point. I hadn't thought of the media streaming applications provided by the current gen systems.

And FYI : If you unplug it, the Wii makes a stylish, futuristic paperweight.

lordwow
01-30-12, 11:00 PM
I really think we'll see Microsoft with the 720 and Apple with their not-yet-announced-but-must-be-coming TV going head to head with streaming/DVR/Cablebox/etc. So much functionality in our houses could be run through a gaming device or TV. Imagine if it was a modem/router too. That'd get rid of about half my equipment around the living room.

bluetoast
01-30-12, 11:16 PM
For video games: I would also agree with the majority and say achievements. I only hope they are able to successfully transfer this gen's information to the next, but I wouldn't think that would be too hard for them.

To add to the wireless controller things, the Wavebird was awesome, and I remember seeing ads from Nintendo for countdowns to the release date, it was a big deal. I had wireless controllers for the Genesis but you had to point them in the direction of the receiving unit, which was a minor inconvenience. But this gen we have packaged controllers that have full functionality, and are chargeable (for PS3, and optional for 360). That's a big step up, since the Wavebird (and the original PS3 controllers) didn't have rumble. There's no more tripping over the cables and knocking over the system (although the original Xbox's dongle cord was genius).

Nintendo prematurely discontinued the Wavebird, I'm sure there are plenty of people who would buy a re-configured WB specifically for the Wii (that is, actual syncing instead of the radio dials, rumble, possible motion configuration).

For the consoles themselves: The fact that they are media centers, especially the PS3 and 360. For the first few months, I didn't even use the PS3 for video games.

RocShemp
01-31-12, 06:49 AM
Fuck achievements. Seriously. Biggest advancement this gen, for me: wireless controllers!

Same. Doing zany shit in a game just to see if it could be done is stuff we were doing since the NES days (if not sooner). Someone just slapped achievments on it.

I actually find achievments double-edged since now they're intentionally programed into a game like a quota. Before it was just something that seemed implausible but could be done under the right circumstances and with the right amount of reflexes. Though, yes, there was the ocassional easter egg intentionaly placed their by the programmers.

Wireless controllers, on the other hand, allow me to sit comfortably on my couch and play on my HT setup. My N64 is unplayable now because of the ridiculously short cord on the controller.

Raul3
01-31-12, 12:21 PM
If you have your Wii connected to the internet, it also works as a fancy night light.

FatTony
01-31-12, 02:53 PM
5) A shift away from strictly gaming - I use my 360 more as a Netflix player than as a gaming system. I use my PS3 more as a Blu-Ray player than as a gaming system. I use my Wii more as a dust collector than a gaming system.

Exactly what I was going to say. Consoles are no longer just for games. My PS3 is basically the centerpiece of my entire home theater. Up until recently (I just got cable for the first time in years), 100% of what I viewed on my TV was running through my PS3 - Blu-ray, Netflix, streaming from my PC, and of course playing games. Achievements are fun and motion controls are a fad that seems to be on the wane. The change in the nature of what a console is and what it can do is what I find to be a true advancement.

I'll also mention the things that are now standard for consoles: online connectivity (and WiFi), wireless controllers, HD graphics (Wii notwithstanding), DLC, downloadable games, and large hard drives, to mention a few. These are all things that existed before, sure. But they're standard now and will be for all generations going forward (Nintendo's head-up-their-ass strategies aside).

fujishig
01-31-12, 03:24 PM
If we're going to nitpick, I'd also say that last generation was when the console morphed into more of an entertainment center. I'm sure the PS2 and the Xbox were the first and sometimes only DVD players in some households. And while it was an unauthorized mod, XBMC is STILL a great media center, arguably better than the built in ones of the current gen.

I do wonder how profitable this has been for Sony/MS... I'm not sure they make money from Netflix, and I know they don't off of streaming from a PC, but do people really buy movies and music off of their services? I remember checking out the prices for buying videos, and I wasn't impressed with the prices, let alone the space limitations.

Drexl
01-31-12, 04:23 PM
If we're going to nitpick, I'd also say that last generation was when the console morphed into more of an entertainment center. I'm sure the PS2 and the Xbox were the first and sometimes only DVD players in some households. And while it was an unauthorized mod, XBMC is STILL a great media center, arguably better than the built in ones of the current gen.

I do wonder how profitable this has been for Sony/MS... I'm not sure they make money from Netflix, and I know they don't off of streaming from a PC, but do people really buy movies and music off of their services? I remember checking out the prices for buying videos, and I wasn't impressed with the prices, let alone the space limitations.

The Xbox also (legitimately) allowed you to rip CDs to its hard drive and play them outside of games.

Whether they make much money or not, I think they realize that they need to include these features to compete (although MS has resisted a BD drive for movies). If someone is considering a device for streaming video, and the game consoles can do it, he might get one of them and become a potential customer for games.

Even Nintendo, which I believe would like to just stick to games, allowed Netflix on the Wii.

Fandango
01-31-12, 07:15 PM
I don't think this was mentioned but game demos and betas that you could download was pretty revolutionary.

story
01-31-12, 07:47 PM
Since I've only had my PS3 for a year and I've only played my first games on this gen since then (BF games, mostly) I don't know that I can say what the greatest advancement in this generation is because I'll probably add something which is actually about another generation.

But that said...

I think the number one thing about video games today that blows me away is all of the statistical data the game is able to track for each player. It knows how many enemies I've killed, how many rounds I've fired, what my accuracy is, how much ground I've traveled, and even how often I swing my knife at anything other than air. That's crazy. I'll bet this is one of the most massive advancements in video games ever and a large majority of the non-gaming population have any idea. Instead, they think about graphics.

My two cents.

kgrogers1979
01-31-12, 07:55 PM
Since I've only had my PS3 for a year and I've only played my first games on this gen since then (BF games, mostly) I don't know that I can say what the greatest advancement in this generation is because I'll probably add something which is actually about another generation.

You are right. Tracking statistical data isn't anything new for video games.

redcat
01-31-12, 08:06 PM
I don't think this was mentioned but game demos and betas that you could download was pretty revolutionary.

And thank God for that. I remember subscribing to the "Official XBox Magazine" mainly to get the demo disc (which was non-damaged enough to actually work about 1/3 of the time.)

Drexl
01-31-12, 09:04 PM
You are right. Tracking statistical data isn't anything new for video games.

True, but now they also do it through achievements and the developers can see this data on their end. A big reason why they have achievements for mundane things like "beat this level" is so that they can track how far players got.

They were talking about that on the Steam forums recently about Fallout: NV. Through the global achievements, you can see what the most popular quest lines were.

fumanstan
01-31-12, 09:38 PM
True, but now they also do it through achievements and the developers can see this data on their end. A big reason why they have achievements for mundane things like "beat this level" is so that they can track how far players got.

They were talking about that on the Steam forums recently about Fallout: NV. Through the global achievements, you can see what the most popular quest lines were.

To be fair, depending on what kind of tracking the developer implements, achievements aren't necessary for most of that tracking.

story
01-31-12, 10:13 PM
You are right. Tracking statistical data isn't anything new for video games.

And I don't know how long "anything new" is, if that's ten years or what. But my point is that those who haven't played games since the heydays of the arcade or even the Atari and NES days might be astonished to know the reach of statistical data games keep track of every time one plays. I know I was.

kgrogers1979
01-31-12, 10:49 PM
And I don't know how long "anything new" is, if that's ten years or what. But my point is that those who haven't played games since the heydays of the arcade or even the Atari and NES days might be astonished to know the reach of statistical data games keep track of every time one plays. I know I was.

There is an entire genre of games that is pretty much based on keeping track of statistical data. Simulation games or world-empire building type games. Good examples of the genre would be Sim City, Rollercoaster Tycoon, and especially the Civilization series. Some of those games are extremely in-depth. In Civilization, you keep track of how much food you are producing and many many other things. There are graphs and diagrams, pie charts and bar graphs galore in that game. The instruction book (aka the Civilopedia) is a couple hundred pages long, basically almost novel-length itself.

kgrogers1979
01-31-12, 10:54 PM
I don't think this was mentioned but game demos and betas that you could download was pretty revolutionary.

Except it has been done with PC gaming since at least the Doom/Wolfenstein days in the early 90s.

fumanstan
01-31-12, 10:57 PM
Those are all part of the game's design and gameplay though; I think thats different from the data gathered that it sounds like others are talking about, such as some of the data that was shared by Mass Effect devs like what the most used weapon is, what level a user dies the most in, how many people actually finished the game, etc.

kgrogers1979
01-31-12, 11:50 PM
Still though, even when its not part of the gameplay itself, games have been keeping statistical data for a long time. I am replaying Baldur's Gate now for the umpteenth time, and it keeps track of each party member's total kills, the total percentage of experience in the party they are responsible for obtaining, their most used weapon and spells, and so on. A lot of old PC games did stuff like that.

fumanstan
02-01-12, 12:17 AM
Completely different kind of data, and for completely different reasons in my opinion :shrug:

Fandango
02-01-12, 12:24 AM
Except it has been done with PC gaming since at least the Doom/Wolfenstein days in the early 90s.

If you read the OP it is pretty clear the discussion was limited to consoles.

kgrogers1979
02-01-12, 12:37 AM
If you read the OP it is pretty clear the discussion was limited to consoles.


If you read the OP you would know he made an exception for online gaming since it had been done on PCs before this gen...

And we have been making exceptions like that throughout the whole thread.

kgrogers1979
02-01-12, 12:40 AM
Completely different kind of data, and for completely different reasons in my opinion :shrug:


How? He was talking about FPS games keeping track of your number of kills and your favorite weapon, so how is that different from PC games in the 90s doing that same thing?

fumanstan
02-01-12, 12:54 AM
How? He was talking about FPS games keeping track of your number of kills and your favorite weapon, so how is that different from PC games in the 90s doing that same thing?

The original comment was, but I was commenting on Drexl's reply about a different type of stat collecting. Random stats specifically collected for the player to view for shits and giggles is one thing, whereas keeping track of player behavior for development and game improvement is another.

To dogmatica's point, I guess you can argue that keeping statistical data and using it as a competitive measure against all users online is a bit different versus offline stats.