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View Full Version : Comic Legend Jerry Robinson Passes Away


The Valeyard
12-08-11, 12:28 PM
http://www.newsarama.com/comics/jerry-robinson-passed-away-111208.html

Joker Creator JERRY ROBINSON, R.I.P. 2011

By Lucas Siegel, Newsarama Editor
posted: 08 December 2011 11:04 am ET


Jerry Robinson, the creator of The Joker, largely hailed as Batman's greatest villain, passed away in his sleep Wednesday night at the age of 89.

The NYC Graphic Novelists blog was first to report the news, with LA Times Hero Complex and CBR corroborating soon after.

Robinson, born January 1, 1922, remained ever humble about his creations and was a staunch advocate for creator's rights. He was only 17 years old when he started work on Batman's earliest adventures, then a journalism student at Columbia University, according to his biography on JerryRobinsonArt.com.

In an interview with Newsarama he told us of The Joker, "We did know we had a great character in the present. And as soon as we did it, we knew we had one for longer than the first story."

He worked specifically for Superman creators Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel in the 1970s, helping them gain official credit for their creations, and has worked with both American and international governments to support cartoonists.

The artist was inducted into the Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2004, and worked in recent years with DC Comics as a "creative consultant," in addition to serving in and founding multiple associations for cartoonists, including acting as President and Editorial Director of CartoonArts International and Cartoonists & Writers Syndicate. in 2010, he won the Hero Initiative Dick Giordano Humanitarian of the Year award as part of the Harvey Awards at Baltimore Comicon.

DC Entertainment released statements early Thursday afternoon from executives and editors.

“Jerry Robinson illustrated some of the defining images of pop culture’s greatest icons. As an artist myself, it’s impossible not to feel humbled by his body of work. Everyone who loves comics owes Jerry a debt of gratitude for the rich legacy that he leaves behind.”—Jim Lee, DC Entertainment Co-Publisher and artist of BATMAN: HUSH

“Jerry Robinson was one of the greats. He continued to be a vibrant, creative force well into his nineties, with ideas and thoughts that continue to inspire. Jerry was a great advocate for creators. It was my pleasure to meet and work with him. He will be missed.”—Dan DiDio, Co-Publisher, DC Entertainment

“It’s impossible to work at DC Entertainment* without feeling the impact of Jerry Robinson’s contributions to the industry. His influence continues to resonate today.”—Bob Harras, DC Entertainment Editor-in-Chief

“Jerry Robinson was an innovator, a pioneer in storytelling. His artwork was always astonishing, but his contributions to the Dark Knight mythology go far beyond art. The streets of Gotham City are a little lonelier today...Jerry will truly be missed.”—Mike Marts, BATMAN editor.


Wiki Article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Robinson)


Without him (and Neal Adams), Siegel & Shuster would have remained destitute and forgotten in their final years.

I met him at the 2005 SDCC. I shook his hand and thanked him for everything he had done for the industry in general. I saw him at this year's Comic Con but didn't go over this time. Now I wish I had.

RIP Jerry. Your contributions will live forever.

Bronkster
12-09-11, 10:52 AM
As a long-time comic collector, I'm embarrassed that I'm so oblivious to someone who contributed so much to comics. Sounds like he had a great life doing what he loved. Rest in peace, Jerry.

mrhan
12-09-11, 05:51 PM
I'm embarrassed that I'm so oblivious to someone who contributed so much to comics. Sounds like he had a great life doing what he loved. Rest in peace, Jerry.

I knew who he was but most artists/writers before 1965 and after 1998 I don't know much about. I read TPBs but I can't really say I'm a fan of anyone's work today. It all looks the same to me. I collect only SA and GA books now and I still don't know who did what 'cause I don't read them. Now, if you ask me about BA books I'm a freakin' encyclopedia of information. I guess it all depends on what your into.

davidh777
12-11-11, 10:59 PM
The name is familiar to me but I wouldn't have been able to identify him. Lasting contributions, though. RIP

JasonF
12-11-11, 11:11 PM
Part of me is surprised to hear so many comics fans unaware of Jerry Robinson's contributions, but then I think about the way Bob Kane and later DC made a concerted effort to create the illusion that Batman was a one-man production of Kane and I realize that I shouldn't be surprised. But the reality is that while Kane may have had the initial idea for Batman, Bill Finger was there from the start and Jerry Robinson came on board within months of Detective #27.

JohnnyMovie
12-12-11, 02:27 PM
:rip: Jerry Robinson :rip:

Paul_SD
12-13-11, 06:21 AM
The earliest comics I collected off the newstand as a kid were DCs 100 page super-spectaculars in the early seventies. about 24 pages of new stories and art with the remainder of the book being reprints- of mostly golden age material. That's where I first got hip to Robinson and how different and special his work was. Compared to the more stylized (and sometimes primitive looking) work of Sprang and Moldoff (who drew all the work that Bob Kane signed as his own), Robinson had the draftsmanship of someone educated with classical, formal training. His figures had natural centers of gravity, were realistically proportioned, and posed in dynamic but logical ways. Next to Jack Burnley, he was on a very short list of the absolute best, most illustrative, Golden Age artists, and definitely one of, if not THE best early Batman artists- just in terms of drawing ability/skill alone. Needless to say he contributed even more than just well rendered panels to Batman.

I saw his new book on the shelf last year I think and was very surprised then to see that he was still around and not only kicking, but productive. That was cool to see. He seems to have enjoyed a long productive life with lasting creative contributions to pop culture. Not a small thing.
This is the first I'm hearing about his involvement in the whole Siegal /Schuster business- a sidebar that only further enhances his position in this realm.

Part of me is surprised to hear so many comics fans unaware of Jerry Robinson's contributions, but then I think about the way Bob Kane and later DC made a concerted effort to create the illusion that Batman was a one-man production of Kane and I realize that I shouldn't be surprised. But the reality is that while Kane may have had the initial idea for Batman, Bill Finger was there from the start and Jerry Robinson came on board within months of Detective #27.

Yeah DC and Kane made a devil's compact back in the day to willfully foster that precept- a big reason why so many professionals still despise Kane. Kane's contribution was little more than ripping off ideas that he saw elsewhere (I think I recall seeing the famous Detective 27 cover was actually a swipe of a Alex Raymond Flash Gordon panel). Finger and Robinson were the parents that raised and nurtured the character and gave it it's soul. If you love Batman, these were the guys you should be lighting a candle for.

The Valeyard
12-13-11, 10:15 AM
Not to turn this into a Kane bashing thread but here's a good read (which includes the Kane swipes):

Secret Origins of Batman Part 1 (http://www.dialbforblog.com/archives/389/)

Secret Origins of Batman Part 2 (http://www.dialbforblog.com/archives/390/)

Secret Origins of Batman Part 3 (http://www.dialbforblog.com/archives/391/)

Bronkster
12-13-11, 11:36 AM
Not to turn this into a Kane bashing thread but here's a good read (which includes the Kane swipes):

Secret Origins of Batman Part 1 (http://www.dialbforblog.com/archives/389/)

Secret Origins of Batman Part 2 (http://www.dialbforblog.com/archives/390/)

Secret Origins of Batman Part 3 (http://www.dialbforblog.com/archives/391/)

Wow! That was an interesting read. Kane sounds like a total dick.

The Valeyard
12-13-11, 11:50 AM
Oh, he was.

jrsl76
12-13-11, 02:01 PM
Not to turn this into a Kane bashing thread but here's a good read (which includes the Kane swipes):

Secret Origins of Batman Part 1 (http://www.dialbforblog.com/archives/389/)

Secret Origins of Batman Part 2 (http://www.dialbforblog.com/archives/390/)

Secret Origins of Batman Part 3 (http://www.dialbforblog.com/archives/391/)

Thanks for posting these. It was a fascinating and illuminating read. I had no idea.

ytrez
12-15-11, 09:49 AM
And then there are the clown paintings!

idleprimate
04-09-12, 09:34 PM
I've been reading his massive tome on the history of comic strips. The man was a tireless warrior to ensure comics got the recognition they deserve