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What's the deal with rough-cut hardbacks? [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum
 
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View Full Version : What's the deal with rough-cut hardbacks?


aynrandgirl
09-21-10, 03:19 AM
Like the Shannara omnibuses, for instance. Is this supposed to be rustic and "sophisticated"? It makes them look super-cheap, and they aren't even acid-free (I have books which say they are so I presume ones that don't aren't) to make up for it. Why do publishers come out with rough-cut editions?

djmont
09-21-10, 10:58 AM
Knopf does it for all their books, too -- it's supposed to be fancier. I'm not really a fan, though.

FunkDaddy J
09-21-10, 11:05 AM
I don't mind them at all; in fact, I do think it's a nicer look. And harder to get stained with fingerprints. :)

Geofferson
09-21-10, 11:49 AM
I don't mind them either. They can also make it easier to sift through the pages as well.

Philzilla
09-21-10, 01:44 PM
I like it as well

kakistos
09-21-10, 06:13 PM
I like them. It's meant to "resemble handmade paper by applying a frayed texture to the edges."

Apparently some people dislike them so much that amazon had to start putting a note on any books with a deckle edge.

The Bus
09-21-10, 11:40 PM
I like it. First noticed it on Disclosure.

Supermallet
09-25-10, 11:17 AM
Before there were automated processes for publishing books, and they had to be done more by hand, that is what they looked like, as you couldn't get the clean cut. Now it's an aesthetic thing, unless you're getting books really made by hand.

Geofferson
09-25-10, 02:59 PM
I like it. First noticed it on Disclosure.
I recalled first seeing it with a Crichton book. The more I think about it, was probably Disclosure too.

djmont
09-27-10, 11:25 AM
Funny -- I think I noticed it on a Crichton book first, too. Maybe Rising Sun?

Mordred
09-27-10, 03:38 PM
This bugs the hell out of me, but my wife loves it. Go figure.

pagefrance
10-02-10, 03:36 PM
I was not aware that the rough edges were left on purose. I thought it was a flaw in the binding. Now that I know better, I don't really mind but prefer the straight edge.

Josh-da-man
10-02-10, 11:52 PM
I think the first book I ever noticed it on was Anne Rice's "Tale of the Body Thief." (Too lazy to get up and check my copy of the hardcover.)

A quick web search shows that and "Rising Sun" and "Body Thief" both came out in 1992 from Knopf...

Jon2
10-04-10, 11:50 PM
I'm presuming you are talking about hard cover books.

Back in the '60-70's, when I was a member of the SF Book Club, that was how copies sold though book clubs looked. I still have all those I bought, including my first... Asimov's The Foundation Trilogy, an intro freebie for buying four books when I signed up.

Due to the web printing process, there are always some pages that come out unevenly at the end of printing, but make it through to final bindery with uneven edges that are too short to be trimmed down to smooth edges. Not so much a flaw as it is just the nature of how things work. Kind of like cutting logs to make lumber... there are always some pieces with rough uneven edges.

Because they were considered blemished, such books were unsellable through normal retail channels and ended up being discounted through various book clubs.

Funny how an attribute that was once associated with low-end book club editions is now something of a mark of distinction.

BTW, an uneven edge on paper is referred to as a deckle edge

Tommy Ceez
10-05-10, 06:36 AM
Its a big problem on my Kindle

aynrandgirl
10-05-10, 06:48 AM
Funny how an attribute that was once associated with low-end book club editions is now something of a mark of distinction.
Yes, I do find that bizarre. It would be like saying an auto body with visible tool marks and surface imperfections was higher quality than one without them.

MoviePage
10-08-10, 04:09 PM
I prefer a straight edge.

BobO'Link
10-10-10, 05:08 PM
I'm presuming you are talking about hard cover books.

Back in the '60-70's, when I was a member of the SF Book Club, that was how copies sold though book clubs looked. I still have all those I bought, including my first... Asimov's The Foundation Trilogy, an intro freebie for buying four books when I signed up.

Due to the web printing process, there are always some pages that come out unevenly at the end of printing, but make it through to final bindery with uneven edges that are too short to be trimmed down to smooth edges. Not so much a flaw as it is just the nature of how things work. Kind of like cutting logs to make lumber... there are always some pieces with rough uneven edges.

Because they were considered blemished, such books were unsellable through normal retail channels and ended up being discounted through various book clubs.

Funny how an attribute that was once associated with low-end book club editions is now something of a mark of distinction.

BTW, an uneven edge on paper is referred to as a deckle edge
And now that this type edge is in vogue, SFBC (and their other club) editions mostly come with a smooth cut edge. I, too, have a copy of "The Foundation Trilogy" from the 60's with deckle edge along with 100's of other SFBC editions having that "feature". I always thought it was just one way they could offer less expensive hard cover editions since they didn't pay to have the edges cut off.