DVD Talk
Why Don't More People Here Read Female Authors? [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum
 
Best Sellers
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
The Longest Day
Buy: $54.99 $24.99
9.
10.
DVD Blowouts
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Alien [Blu-ray]
Buy: $19.99 $9.99
8.
9.
10.

PDA
DVD Reviews

View Full Version : Why Don't More People Here Read Female Authors?


movieking
04-11-10, 05:15 PM
Just going by what people post in the what are you reading threads, there doesn't seem to be a lot of people on the board that regularly read any fiction female authors, such as books from the JD Robb "In Death" series, the Iris Johansen "Eve Duncan" series, the Sue Grafton Alphabet series, the Janet Evanovich "Stephanie Plum" series, or even the Kathy Reichs "Temperance Brennan" series. Based on sales all of these are bestsellers, so someone is reading them, but it doesn't appear to be many on this board.

Just curious about this subject, since my sister in law has pretty much all of these books, and has offered them to me many times, but I'm hesitant, perhaps because of the author's sex. At this point, I've read the first Sue Grafton novel in the series, and two of the Temperance Brennan ones, and I've found both of them pretty standard fare for the genre, regardless of the gender of the author. So is there a lack of female authors in the what are you reading threads because this is a male dominated board and most males tend to stick to male writers? If so, is it because there is an assumption that if a female wrote it, it will be female oriented and hence not as interesting to men? Are there any other reasons?

Ginwen
04-11-10, 06:02 PM
Those aren't in a genre I really read much of, but I probably read half or more female authors. My last 2 or 3 I've posted in the what you're reading threads have all been female authors.

Sessa17
04-11-10, 06:05 PM
Given that most peopel here don't read, (just look at how few people post in the book forum & its pretty much the same people) it shouldn't be much of a suprise that the few people that do read mostly read male authors.

I'm a big fan of Robin Hobb but for me there just aren't many good female authors. Much like film & music, I don't typically gravitate to mainstream fare, which is what this forum is dominated with. I'll read a good author man, woman, kid, whatever as long as the content is there. But DVD Talk is board consumed with mass-market, mainstream-don't-stray-off-the-beaten-path taste, so it really is pretty obvious why the few readers here, only read male authors, when men typically are what comprise the best seller list.

Nick Danger
04-11-10, 09:24 PM
Not really. There are a lot of woman authors on the bestseller lists. They write books aimed at women. Since almost everyone on the forum is a man, most of them are going to be reading the bestseller authors who write books aimed at men.

According to the New York Times:

Hardcover Fiction
Top 5 at a Glance
1. SILVER BORNE, by Patricia Briggs
2. THE HELP, by Kathryn Stockett
3. CAUGHT, by Harlan Coben
4. DECEPTION, by Jonathan Kellerman
5. HOUSE RULES, by Jodi Picoult

Two are men, two are women, and one is named Jodi. :shrug:

mhg83
04-11-10, 09:31 PM
Are you forgetting J.K. Rowling?

http://forum.dvdtalk.com/book-talk/506203-one-only-harry-potter-deathly-hallows-thread-possible-spoilers-duh.html

http://forum.dvdtalk.com/book-talk/507582-favorite-harry-potter-book.html

Supermallet
04-12-10, 02:30 AM
One of my favorite authors is Virginia Woolf, does that count?

wmermine
04-12-10, 09:00 AM
I'll just say it: I don't normally read books by women because they seem to lean more toward "romance" than what I'm interested in. Of course, there are female authors writing in other genres, but it seems their books still sometimes slip into a "romance" mode. For example (and this was my fault), I started reading something by Laurell Hamilton and it was beginning as a pretty good urban fantasy novel before it turned into a porn. No thanks!

If there are exceptions, particularly urban fantasy, I'd like to know. How is Patricia Briggs?

Sean O'Hara
04-12-10, 09:07 AM
I read female writers when they write stuff I want to read. But the science fiction, horror, and hard boiled detective genres are sausage fests.

Pointyskull
04-12-10, 09:10 AM
I don't pick books based on the author's sex, and I've never even considered that as a basis or criteria for selecting reading material.

I love the Grafton series, btw. She made me fall in love with Kinsey Millhone.

Sean O'Hara
04-12-10, 09:16 AM
If there are exceptions, particularly urban fantasy, I'd like to know. How is Patricia Briggs?

I think this cover says it all:

http://avidbookreader.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/iron-kissed-by-briggs.jpg

I also recommend against Kim Harrison.

http://loriswp.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/dead-witch-walking-cover.jpg

However, the Greywalker series by Kat Richardson is pretty good.

http://katrichardson.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/GreyWalkerCoverSm.jpg

Drop
04-12-10, 10:22 AM
I certainly read more books by men, but it's just the way it's worked out.

Some of my favorite female writers:
Mary Shelly
Meg Gardiner
Zora Neale Hurston
Amy Hempel
Lee Harper
Flannery O'Connor
Joyce Carol Oates

Ash Ketchum
04-12-10, 10:39 AM
In honor of this thread, I started reading a novel by Patricia Highsmith this weekend (Ripley's Game).

(My favorite female author is...Joan Didion.)

wmermine
04-12-10, 11:56 AM
Yeah, I might get some strange looks from the wife if I start reading those (although, I could just put them on the Kindle).

I did read the first Sookie Stackhouse book and enjoyed the plot and all, with the exception of the softcore porn elements. I heard it just got worse in the subsequent novels.

I think this cover says it all:

http://avidbookreader.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/iron-kissed-by-briggs.jpg

I also recommend against Kim Harrison.

http://loriswp.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/dead-witch-walking-cover.jpg

However, the Greywalker series by Kat Richardson is pretty good.

http://katrichardson.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/GreyWalkerCoverSm.jpg

movieking
04-12-10, 01:39 PM
I love the Grafton series, btw. She made me fall in love with Kinsey Millhone.

Glad to hear that, I read the first novel, and while I did put it down a little way in, after I picked it up again, it got much better towards the end.

I did read the first Sookie Stackhouse book and enjoyed the plot and all, with the exception of the softcore porn elements. I heard it just got worse in the subsequent novels.

I forgot about the Sookie Stackhouse series, or else I would have included it in my list of examples. I definitely want to start this series as well. So supposedly did the books get worse or did the softcare porn elements?

wmermine
04-12-10, 01:59 PM
I forgot about the Sookie Stackhouse series, or else I would have included it in my list of examples. I definitely want to start this series as well. So supposedly did the books get worse or did the softcare porn elements?

I'm not sure about the quality of the books generally. The first was pretty good, if you like really simplistic writing. I seem to remember a thread on this forum where people were saying, as the series went along, the sexual themes/elements were more prevalent. Of course, it is a vampire series, so some of that is to be expected. It just seems geared toward a more female readership... more like a romance novel than an urban fantasy or horror (of course, I don't mean to say that women only read romance novels).

Supermallet
04-12-10, 02:38 PM
I also like Wuthering Heights. I feel like these aren't the kind of female authors you're looking for, though.

Ginwen
04-12-10, 03:50 PM
I read female writers when they write stuff I want to read. But the science fiction, horror, and hard boiled detective genres are sausage fests.

There are plenty of good female SF writers (Bujold, Willis, Elizabeth Bear, LeGuin older stuff at least, and lots more).

mlemmond
04-12-10, 03:54 PM
I looked back at my lists of books I've read (since 2006) and I only came across these female authors on my list.

Laurell K. Hamilton
Dorothy & Thomas Hoobler
Chelsea Cain
Agatha Christie
Mary Shelley

I have also read books by Anne Rice in the past but none since Merrick.

For the most part female authors don't really write characters I identify with or stories I want to read. I don't go looking for female or male authors, I just pick up books that interest me and when I find an author I like I stick with them.

djmont
04-12-10, 04:31 PM
Someone above hit on the reason for this: This forum is male-dominated and men don't typically read books written by women. (This is in contrast to women, who are willing to read books by both sexes. A good thing, too, since they represent a solid majority of fiction buyers.)

Movieking, I've read all the authors you cite in your original post. I would recommend skipping Robb, Johansen and Reichs, none of whom I cared much for. The others are better.

johnnysd
04-12-10, 05:12 PM
For fantasy readers, two female authors that I have read that are quite excellent are

N.K. Jemisin

http://www.amazon.com/Hundred-Thousand-Kingdoms-Inheritance-Trilogy/dp/0316043915/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1271106573&sr=8-1

Anne Bishop

http://www.amazon.com/Daughter-Blood-Black-Jewels-Book/dp/0451461487/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1271106677&sr=1-1

starman9000
04-12-10, 08:12 PM
I've been a terrible reader lately, but half of them have been women. With the exception of Rowling, it's only because of they are from a series of franchised books (Stargate), and not because I love the authors.

Margaret Weis and Tracey Hickman were my favorites growing up. Do they count? ;)

celmendo
04-12-10, 08:23 PM
3 of the last 5 books read were women:
Kim Harrison - Black Magic Sanction
Patricia Briggs - Silver Bourne
Kayalana Price - Twice Dead

The last two are urban fantasy without too much romance at all. Kim is def. girly and there's a lot of men but it's less romance and more screwed up relationships and there's far more action than that. It's a fun series.

Sean O'Hara
04-12-10, 09:54 PM
There are plenty of good female SF writers (Bujold, Willis, Elizabeth Bear, LeGuin older stuff at least, and lots more).

Of those, LeGuin is the only one I consider good. I've never made it past 20 pages of a Bujold novel, and I damned near tossed The Doomsday Book across the room because of all the idiotic characters. Of Moon, I've only read Shoggoths in Bloom, which I found completely predictable.

Now Cherryh, and C.L. Moore, those were good authors, but Moore's dead and Cherryh and LeGuin are on the downsides of their careers.

Ginwen
04-13-10, 12:04 AM
Of those, LeGuin is the only one I consider good. I've never made it past 20 pages of a Bujold novel, and I damned near tossed The Doomsday Book across the room because of all the idiotic characters. Of Moon, I've only read Shoggoths in Bloom, which I found completely predictable.

Now Cherryh, and C.L. Moore, those were good authors, but Moore's dead and Cherryh and LeGuin are on the downsides of their careers.

I understand your complaint about it, but I loved the Doomsday Book, in spite of the infuriating parts. The new one's even worse that way incidentally--way too much time spent on people not realizing they're stuck and trying to deal with it. The misunderstanding/miscommunication pieces of the plot I could do without, but taking a modern person and putting them into the middle of the plague (or the bombing of London in the new one) is totally interesting to me.


You meant Bear, not Moon (although I like Elizabeth Moon too, I generally have a thing for females overcoming impossible odds which she has a lot of). I haven't read that story you mentioned, some Elizabeth Bear (the more SF stuff) I like a lot (especially Hammered probably due to another kickass female) the fantasy stuff I could do without but fantasy isn't my thing in general. Bujold I really enjoy the Miles Vorkosigan(?) books (however you spell it)--they're goofy but I think they have some pretty interesting ideas in them, and I just think they're entertaining. Again, not as fond of the fantasy stuff although it's not bad as some.

I don't like when some female authors (Laurell Hamilton comes to mind) have the explicit endless sex (although I just skip right past those parts usually, until they start taking over) but it's not like every woman has all that touchy feely stuff, look at Ripley, written by a woman and that guy is totally cold.

Dr. Mantle
04-13-10, 01:40 AM
I'd love to read more female authors, if only they wrote more novels that I'm interested in. Is there a female equivalent for Gene Wolfe, Isaac Asimov, or H.P. Lovecraft?

I've read LeGuin, Bradley, Rowling, Highsmith, Morrison. But I have little interest in those alphabetized murder mysteries. I want a story with ideas. That's why SF appeals to me more than any other genre, though I don't have much interest in space ships and laser guns.

All of the OP's listed authors write that bland, buy-it-at-an-airport-read-it-on-the-plane-and-forget-about-it junk that's always clogging the bestseller list.

I don't have anymore interest in them than Tom Clancy, John Grisham or Nicholas Sparks.

Maybe female authors need to take risks more often. Then they might produce something original and lasting.

maxfisher
04-13-10, 10:32 AM
I'm not sure about the quality of the books generally. The first was pretty good, if you like really simplistic writing. I seem to remember a thread on this forum where people were saying, as the series went along, the sexual themes/elements were more prevalent. Of course, it is a vampire series, so some of that is to be expected. It just seems geared toward a more female readership... more like a romance novel than an urban fantasy or horror (of course, I don't mean to say that women only read romance novels).

God I hated the Sookie series. I bought a box set of them and enjoyed the first one. The second was iffy, but not too bad. After that, they got horrible. I forced myself through the fifth one, hoping they'd turn around, but they kept getting worse. They're just pathetic. The writing's lousy and horribly repetitive. Harris doesn't worry too much about continuity. Sookie herself becomes a less and less interesting character, devolving pretty much into an idiot with a sex obsession who's defined by the men/creatures that want to fuck her. They get to the point that they're nothing more than female fantasies where readers get to imagine themselves as Sookie, for whom all these incredibly powerful beings are just completely overwhelmed by her sex appeal. There are few books I'd recommend less.

Tscott
04-13-10, 12:04 PM
A few years ago I was in a 'classic book' kick and read a bunch of well known and talked about books that for the first time. As a result I read Catcher in the Rye and The Bell Jar around the same time and always thought it was odd that people seemed to want to talk about the first but no one ever wanted to comment on Sylvia Plath's book.

I'm on book 7 of the Sookie Stackhouse books (I got the 8 book boxset for under $35) and while it's not great literature, I'm finding them fun to read and hard to put down.

I really enjoyed Christa Faust's 'Money Shot' from the Hard Case Crimes series and look forward to finding other stuff by her.

And I've read a couple books by Catlin R. Kiernan that I've enjoyed. She worked on The Dreaming comic which spun off of Neil Gaiman's Sandman after that was through, and her books seem to be in the same goth underworld horror vein.

wmermine
04-13-10, 12:07 PM
I really enjoyed Christa Faust's 'Money Shot' from the Hard Case Crimes series and look forward to finding other stuff by her.


Yeah, Christa Faust is pretty good. 'Money Shot' was good, as well as her recent entry in the Gabriel Hunt series.


Anyone read any Megan Abbot? I've been wanting to check out her books since I'm a big fan of hardboiled stuff and it seems that's what her book as billed as.

rkndkn
04-13-10, 02:30 PM
I'll just say it: I don't normally read books by women because they seem to lean more toward "romance" than what I'm interested in. Of course, there are female authors writing in other genres, but it seems their books still sometimes slip into a "romance" mode.

Although I am female, this is the reason I usually stay away from female authors. I primarily read thrillers/mysteries, and I don't like romance mixed in with that. About the only female author I liked is Edna Buchanan, whose early books were very gritty (I have not read her in quite a while). I found the mother/daughter team writing under P.J. Tracy quite promising with "Monkeewrench" and may try another of theirs. I also prefer male protagonists and will usually avoid lead female characters (for example, I like Thomas Perry, but do not want to read his Jane Whitefield series).

Once in a great while, I get in a different reading mood and may read something by Philippa Gregory or the like. I loved "The Other Boleyn Girl".

Tscott
04-13-10, 06:38 PM
Just thought of a couple others I've read: Agatha Christie and P.D. James

Although I don't read much pure mystery these days, these were the two I enjoyed reading when I used to. I didn't even realize P.D. James was female until later after I was looking into why there weren't more Cordelia Gray Mysteries written (I always liked her more than Dalgliesh).

celmendo
04-13-10, 08:31 PM
I'd love to read more female authors, if only they wrote more novels that I'm interested in. Is there a female equivalent for Gene Wolfe, Isaac Asimov, or H.P. Lovecraft?


Have you tried Julian May, The Saga of Pliocene Exile and The Galactic Milieu Series? I wouldn't put her in an Asimov class level but I enjoyed her series a great deal.

movieking
04-14-10, 09:27 AM
I also like Wuthering Heights. I feel like these aren't the kind of female authors you're looking for, though.

I should have included some classic literature in my original post, but just listed some names off of the top of my head.

Movieking, I've read all the authors you cite in your original post. I would recommend skipping Robb, Johansen and Reichs, none of whom I cared much for. The others are better.

Thanks for the recommendation. To me, the Johansen and Reichs series are very similar as they both deal with female scientists who try to solve murders (sort of), except one is a forensic sculptor, and the other is a forensic anthropologist. I read a number of the Eve Duncan series a few years ago and thought that they were fine, but definitely forgetable and I wouldn't go out of my way to recommend them. I haven't gotten too far with Reichs yet, and the two I read were out of order.

All of the OP's listed authors write that bland, buy-it-at-an-airport-read-it-on-the-plane-and-forget-about-it junk that's always clogging the bestseller list.

I wanted to list more mainstream books as they are by definition more popular and had a better chance of being read by people on the forum as opposed to something that is more niche.

Ash Ketchum
04-14-10, 11:19 AM
I'd love to read more female authors, if only they wrote more novels that I'm interested in. Is there a female equivalent for Gene Wolfe, Isaac Asimov, or H.P. Lovecraft?


Try Leigh Brackett.

Josh-da-man
04-14-10, 01:35 PM
It's been my experience that female authors don't really have a very good fell for science fiction. I can't quite put my finger on what it is, other than it just doesn't seem like the female voice has any kind of "edge" to it.

On the other hand, I remember quite a few female horror authors from the 90s that were quite good, like Kiernan, Faust (mentioned above), Brite, Taylor, and Koja.

Never been a fan of the mystery genre, so I can't comment on any of the mystery authors with any kind of authority.

movieking
04-15-10, 09:35 AM
I'm not much of a science fiction fan, so I probably wouldn't be interested in many of those types of authors, but I've decided to start reading a couple of books that I've had kicking around for a while by female authors that I just always kept putting on the backburner. I just started "In The Woods" by Tana French and I also have her second novel "The Likeness" available after (supposedly the second is superior to the first). I also have two Gillian Flynn books, Dark Places and Sharp Objects, that I'd like to read (I read her a lot when she was the TV critic for Entertainment Weekly).

Travis McClain
04-25-10, 02:37 AM
Looking over the list of what I read last year, I see that I read 35 books. Of them, five were written by women:

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (and other western short stories) by Dorothy M. Johnson
Wait Till Next Year: A Memoir by Doris Kearns Goodwin
A Night Without Armor (poems) by Jewel
Bodies of Water by Roseanne Cash
The Sexual Life of Catherine M. by Catherine Millet

I read Johnson because I love the film version of Liberty Valance. Goodwin was a Christmas gift from my mom about a decade ago I finally got around to reading. Jewel and Cash are recording artists that got my attention again last year. As for Millet...that one got my attention by reputation. I apparently only read six graphic novels last year, and only one was by a woman: Marjane Satrapi's Chicken with Plums, which I read because the year before, a friend lent me her copy of Persepolis and I loved it.

I can't say why it is that so few women placed on my reading list last year, other than to speculate that it's symptomatic of what appeals to me in general. Last year, my reading was mostly either historical/political in nature (I read books by three different presidents, and a secretary of state), or it was prompted by favorite movies (I even read a pair of screenplays). For whatever reason, women apparently didn't figure prominently in my taste last year...which borders on being ironic, given that I found myself listening to more music by women last year than ever before.

None of the mainstream works cited in this thread so far have appealed to me, but I concur with Dr. Mantle--their male counterparts also fail to reach me. I've only read the first two Tom Clancy novels, and the first Grisham I ever read was Skipping Christmas--which I read for the first time last year and found disappointing.

milo bloom
04-28-10, 11:09 AM
I read what I read. I do lean towards science fiction, and that often leans toward male writers, but there's still plenty of females (Le Guin, McCaffrey) and I've also been reading some more classics the older I get, such as Austen, Bronte and Harper Lee.

The only time I let the author steer me away from or towards a title is simply reputation, not gender.

Geofferson
04-28-10, 01:12 PM
Generally speaking, I'm a genre reader (crime fiction) and I typically don't seek out all of the commercial/mass market authors that are so readily available. While there are exceptions (Michael Connelly, John Sandford, etc) the fact that I haven't read books by many female authors may likely be the same reason why I have yet to read a book by James Patterson.

There are a few female authors that have caught my attention in the crime fiction noir genre and I have enjoyed their work:
Megan Abbott
Christa Faust
Vicki Hendricks
Bonnie Kozek
Helen Fitzgerald

Additionally, I will be attending a P.J. Tracy signing tonight (mother/daughter duo of the 'Monkeewrench' series).

GreenMonkey
04-29-10, 05:46 PM
Like other genre readers, the only bestsellers I read are the occasional fantasy or sci-fi books to actually make the lists.

My favorite author, like Sessa, is Robin Hobb.

I'm a fan of Margaret Weis also, but she generally writes with Tracy Hickman, so I guess that's 50/50. Ditto for one of my favorite series (Empire Trilogy) was by Janny Wurts, but co-written with Raymond Feist, and I wasn't as keen on her solo work.

I used to also enjoy some others, like Anne McCaffery, but she's not writing like she used to, IMO. I haven't picked up one of her books in ages.

I don't think the sex of the author matters to me much, though.

movieking
05-02-10, 09:21 PM
EW did a blurb a few weeks ago about "word of mouth smashes", and listed a few books, all which were written by females. Has anyone here read any of these? Without knowing much about them, they definitely seem to skew towards the female interest:


The Postmistress by Sarah Blake
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shafer & Anne Barrows
The Time Traveller's Wife by Audrey Niffernegger
Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen
The Help by Kathryn Stockett

darkside
05-03-10, 12:11 AM
I just read two MC Beaton Hamish Macbeth novels and I love Agatha Christie novels, but overall I do read a lot of books from male authors. Don't think I avoid female authors on purpose, but it has kind of worked out that way.

I will say I rarely like female detective stories. Christie and Grafton are the rare exceptions. Don't know what puts me off about them exactly, but I just feel more comfortable with a Harry Bosch or Fletch as the detective. Maybe it is because I'm a guy and I relate to their point of view better? Not sure.

KirstenS
05-04-10, 12:14 PM
I read a ton of women authors, but then again, I'm also a woman. Like others, one of my favorites is Robin Hobb. Bujold's Vorkosigan series is excellent, but most of the rest of what she has written is garbage. I couldn't finish the last book she wrote (The Sharing Knife). It was horrible romantic tripe. C.S. Friedman is another favorite. I'll devour anything she's written, but I especially loved the Coldfire Trilogy. I don't think many people realize that she's a woman. I really enjoyed Elizabeth Moon's Paksennarion series, and she finally came out with a new book in that series in March. I have that one saved in my pile for my next vacation. I've read a lot of horrible female authors, but I've also read a lot of horrible male authors.

For the most part however, most of the authors I read are men. I'm sure that's mostly because my preferred genre, fantasy/sci fi, is very male-dominated. My mom is a devoted mystery reader, and the male/female ratio is a lot more balanced there.

Travis McClain
05-06-10, 03:05 PM
Well, this thread sufficiently shamed me. Two nights ago, I started reading Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye. I was assigned some excerpts to read back in college, but never took the time to read the entire novel until now.

Larry C.
05-06-10, 03:08 PM
Shit. When did we get a Book Talk?

Travis McClain
05-06-10, 04:09 PM
Shit. When did we get a Book Talk?

Shhh...Nothing to see here...

Larry C.
05-06-10, 05:03 PM
Shhh...Nothing to see here...

Larry C. quietly exits the strange place.

mikehunt
05-08-10, 04:31 PM
http://www.elizabethmoon.com/biblio-vatta.htm

http://www.elizabethmoon.com/biblio-serrano.htm

lamphorn
05-08-10, 07:54 PM
I will read me some Camille Paglia now and then, some Edith Wharton and used to read a lot of Ayn Rand.

djmont
05-09-10, 12:19 PM
Ayn Rand was a woman?

mikehunt
05-09-10, 10:38 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ayn_Rand

touch manly looking but yes Ayn Rand was a woman

darkside
05-09-10, 10:48 PM
Ayn Rand was a woman?

Not even sure Ayn Rand was a human being.

stp115
05-10-10, 11:27 AM
I read a ton of women authors, but then again, I'm also a woman. Like others, one of my favorites is Robin Hobb. Bujold's Vorkosigan series is excellent, but most of the rest of what she has written is garbage. I couldn't finish the last book she wrote (The Sharing Knife). It was horrible romantic tripe. C.S. Friedman is another favorite. I'll devour anything she's written, but I especially loved the Coldfire Trilogy. I don't think many people realize that she's a woman. I really enjoyed Elizabeth Moon's Paksennarion series, and she finally came out with a new book in that series in March. I have that one saved in my pile for my next vacation. I've read a lot of horrible female authors, but I've also read a lot of horrible male authors.

For the most part however, most of the authors I read are men. I'm sure that's mostly because my preferred genre, fantasy/sci fi, is very male-dominated. My mom is a devoted mystery reader, and the male/female ratio is a lot more balanced there.


Robin Hobb's latest (Dragon Keeper) is free in ebook form both on Amazon and at Sony's ebook store. http://www.amazon.com/Dragon-Keeper-Bonus-Material-ebook/dp/B003GFIW10/ref=pd_cp_kinc_0?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2

GreenMonkey
05-10-10, 11:49 AM
Robin Hobb's latest (Dragon Keeper) is free in ebook form both on Amazon and at Sony's ebook store. http://www.amazon.com/Dragon-Keeper-Bonus-Material-ebook/dp/B003GFIW10/ref=pd_cp_kinc_0?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2

I have the hardcover. I'll toss in an order on the Kindle edition and do the Sony one when I get home though, thanks.

I'm getting a mini collection of free ebooks - eventually I need to get a real e-reader to read them. So far I'm using my HP TX2 convertible laptop...but e-ink would be much better.

Travis McClain
05-10-10, 01:39 PM
I finished The Bluest Eye late last night, and the edition I have includes an afterword by Toni Morrison. I found some of her remarks interesting:

Also, although I was pressing for a female expressiveness, it eluded me for the most part, and I had to content myself with female personae because I was not able to secure throughout the work the feminine subtext that is present in the opening sentence (the women gossiping, eager and aghast in "Quiet as it's kept")...It is interesting to me now that where I thought I would have the most difficulty subverting the language to a feminine mode, I had the least: connecting Cholly's "rape" by the whitemen to his own of his daughter. This most masculine act of aggression becomes feminized in my language, "passive," and I think, more accurately repellent when deprived of the male "glamour of shame" rape is (or once was) routinely given.

This was Morrison's first novel, so perhaps this struggle had more to do with the stage of her evolution than anything else. Still, I found it interesting that a woman author would confess to having such a difficult time writing with a feminine voice--especially given the prolific and personal nature of the work itself.

KirstenS
05-12-10, 06:22 PM
Robin Hobb's latest (Dragon Keeper) is free in ebook form both on Amazon and at Sony's ebook store. http://www.amazon.com/Dragon-Keeper-Bonus-Material-ebook/dp/B003GFIW10/ref=pd_cp_kinc_0?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2

Excellent, thank you! I just got the next book in this series (Dragon Haven) in the mail yesterday from Amazon, and it's great to have this one on my Kindle for re-reads.