DVD Talk
How would you rank countries in regards to their contribution to world cinema? [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum
 
Best Sellers
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
The Longest Day
Buy: $54.99 $24.99
9.
10.
DVD Blowouts
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Alien [Blu-ray]
Buy: $19.99 $9.99
8.
9.
10.

PDA
DVD Reviews

View Full Version : How would you rank countries in regards to their contribution to world cinema?


Jaymole
07-14-09, 07:57 AM
Trying to be objective as you can, how would you rank countries in regards to their contribution to World Cinema throughout history. Please list at least your top 10.

FYI:I am NOT asking what your favorite countries are for film.

The top 2 should be a given, and the third was also pretty easy for me, but after that it got much, much harder, especially after 5.

I ended up with

1 - America
2 - France
3 - Japan
4 - Italy
5 - Germany
6 - UK
7 - Russia
8 - Hong Kong
9 - India
10 - Spain

I am interested in seeing what others think.

Giles
07-14-09, 08:31 AM
1. France
2. Hong Kong
3. Italy
4. Japan
5. America
6. UK
7. Spain
8. Russia
9. Germany
10. Iran/Middle East

Ash Ketchum
07-14-09, 09:19 AM
Trying to be subjective as you can, how would you rank countries in regards to their contribution to World Cinema throughout history. Please list at least your top 10.

FYI:I am NOT asking what your favorite countries are for film.

The top 2 should be a given, and the third was also pretty easy for me, but after that it got much, much harder, especially after 5.

I ended up with

1 - America
2 - France
3 - Japan
4 - Italy
5 - Germany
6 - UK
7 - Russia
8 - Hong Kong
9 - India
10 - Spain

I am interested in seeing what others think.

That's a very good list. I might tweak the order just a bit, but only after thinking about it a great deal, which I'm not prepared to do just now. But it's important to remember, as you do, just how much Germany and Russia (the Soviet Union) contributed in the early years of cinema. Would we have had film noir without German expressionism? Would we have THE WILD BUNCH and other great action films without Eisenstein's montage approach to editing? As for France, would we have so much great humanist cinema without Renoir? Or so much of the best American independent cinema without the French New Wave?

If I had to pick the five greatest filmmakers ever, I can tell you that my choices would be two from Hollywood, two from Japan, and one from France.

wendersfan
07-14-09, 10:21 AM
IMO the top two are clearly the U.S. and France, but after that it's tough. I'll have to think about it some more.

Jaymole
07-14-09, 10:29 AM
1. France
2. Hong Kong
3. Italy
4. Japan
5. America
6. UK
7. Spain
8. Russia
9. Germany
10. Iran/Middle East

Do you honestly believe that America is the 5th most important contributor to cinema history or is this a list of your favorites?

toddly6666
07-14-09, 10:31 AM
1 - America
2 - France
3 - Italy
4 - UK (especially David Lean)
5 - Germany
6 - Japan
7 - Spain
8 - Hong Kong
9 - India
10 - Russia

toddly6666
07-14-09, 10:32 AM
Jaymole, I bet you are an anti-Hollywood movie kind of guy? ;)

foofighters7
07-14-09, 10:40 AM
I'm certainly not one to put the U.S. number one because its the USA but its hard to argue against it being #1. I think that basically every other well known director from every other country would say the same thing.

1. U.S.
2. France
3. Italy
4. Japan
5. Germany
6.USSR/Russia
7. Sweden
8. UK
9. Spain
10. India (which is a tough one because on the whole I do not think that, even though they produce the most films per year, they contribute that much to film. I think they are a bit closed off for the most part)

Jaymole
07-14-09, 10:53 AM
I'm certainly not one to put the U.S. number one because its the USA but its hard to argue against it being #1. I think that basically every other well known director from every other country would say the same thing.

1. U.S.
2. France
3. Italy
4. Japan
5. Germany
6.USSR/Russia
7. Sweden
8. UK
9. Spain
10. India (which is a tough one because on the whole I do not think that, even though they produce the most films per year, they contribute that much to film. I think they are a bit closed off for the most part)

I agree about India and I had originally left them off the list but I decided to include them seeing that they have the biggest film Industry in the world.

candyrocket786
07-14-09, 11:20 AM
No love for Korea?

Solid Snake
07-14-09, 12:12 PM
Top two for sure...are USA and France. I'd love to put Japan as high as those two but...Japan's lost it for the most part. Korea is really getting stronger. I for the most part cannot stand India, they have a lot of crappy films in comparison to the great films they have. Not too mention they're lack of respecting copyright. That's not all their films for sure..but someone's got to fix their system.

toddly6666
07-14-09, 12:59 PM
Oops. My comment was for Giles, not jaymole

The Bus
07-14-09, 04:25 PM
Not in order.

USA
France
Germany
Italy
UK
Russia
Japan

Not sure of the others.

Blu Man
07-14-09, 04:46 PM
United States of America. Everybody else is competing for second.

Supermallet
07-14-09, 05:12 PM
I agree with the countries the OP chose for this list except for one, and for the others I'd order them this way:

1 - America
2 - France
3 - Germany
4 - Russia
5 - Japan
6 - Italy
7 - UK
8 - Hong Kong
9 - Spain
10 - Mexico

I put Germany as the third highest not just because of German expressionism, but because of all the German directors who ended up coming to Hollywood, such as Billy Wilder. Russia I put fourth highest because of their advanced use of montage that filtered its way across the world.

Giles
07-14-09, 05:50 PM
Do you honestly believe that America is the 5th most important contributor to cinema history or is this a list of your favorites?

I'm currently NOT impressed with what America is putting out and calling 'cinema'

TheySentYou
07-14-09, 06:01 PM
America's contributions in the silent film era is pretty much responsible for the launching of film history and global cross-pollenation of genres from countries influencing cinema in other countries. So, Giles, America being #1 is kind of a given I'd say, even though our contributions to mainstream film nowadays are a little diluted it seems.

NoirFan
07-14-09, 06:05 PM
I put Germany as the third highest not just because of German expressionism, but because of all the German directors who ended up coming to Hollywood, such as Billy Wilder. Russia I put fourth highest because of their advanced use of montage that filtered its way across the world.

I agree with your ranking and the reasons behind it, though I'd put Italy ahead of Japan, due to the influence of Italian Neo-Realism on world cinema. That's not to slight the huge importance of Kurosawa (nor to minimize the brilliance of Ozu, Naruse, et al), just my opinion that collectively Italy's output is of more significance than Japan's.

printerati
07-14-09, 07:12 PM
No love for Korea?

I initially had the same reaction, but the majority of S. Korea's well-respected contributions have come within the past 10-15 years. From a historical perspective, I couldn't put them in the top 10 yet.

Ash Ketchum
07-14-09, 08:52 PM
Top two for sure...are USA and France. I'd love to put Japan as high as those two but...Japan's lost it for the most part.

The OP asked us to "rank countries in regards to their contribution to World Cinema throughout history."
Just because "Japan's lost it for the most part" doesn't negate the enormous contributions of Kurosawa, Ozu, Mizoguchi, Naruse, Kobayashi, Imamura, Oshima, Fukasaku, Miyazaki, etc., etc., etc.
What part of "throughout history" was not clear to you?

Macross7
07-14-09, 09:09 PM
What exactly has France contributed? I'd say UK for #2

TheySentYou
07-14-09, 09:53 PM
I think the most obvious French contribution is the French New Wave of cinema from Godard and some Truffaut.

NoirFan
07-14-09, 10:05 PM
What exactly has France contributed?

Is this a serious question?

Macross7
07-14-09, 11:15 PM
Is this a serious question?

Why wouldn't it be? Did France invent movie technology? If not, what have they contributed?

Solid Snake
07-14-09, 11:34 PM
Why wouldn't it be? Did France invent movie technology? If not, what have they contributed?

I'd like you to see American films in the 60s and a little in the 70s, speically talking about inspiration from the French New Wave. Bonnie and Clyde for sure was French New Wave inspired. I'd say Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid too. It let directors know that they don't have to be stilted by the tried and true form. You want to do handheld in a dialogue heavy scene? Do it. etc etc. I mean hell...Pulp Fiction is inspired by the French New Wave specifically. It's inspired. I'm not a big Modern French film fan, considering so few that I've seen, but New Wave and older sure as hell was great.

My UK knowledge is rather weak besides knowing of it's great ole Brit Crime films....ah...Get Carter...a classic.

Ash Ketchum- I meant in Ranking. Not in lacking of contribution. I love me some Kurosawa don't doubt me on that. I love him so much that I have every Criterion release of a film of his. (Wartime Kurosawa is really interesting to watch....you really see him hone his skills during this little era of his..plus a younger and still fresh behind the ears Mifune added with some Shimura). I know the other directors have done as well but in Ranking as a country they're not as high as I'd like.

HistoryProf
07-15-09, 01:08 AM
1. France
2. Hong Kong
3. Italy
4. Japan
5. America
6. UK
7. Spain
8. Russia
9. Germany
10. Iran/Middle East

putting America 5th on the list of national contributions to the history of film is beyond laughable...it's just absurd. Please explain to us all how Hong Kong's HISTORY OF FILM is superior to that of the United States - where the medium was basically invented. This may be the single most retarded stance I've ever seen an internet elitist take :lol:

But given your obvious love of foreign cinema i'm surprised to not see Sweden on the list either.

Dr Mabuse
07-15-09, 01:44 AM
The German Expressionists really took film into an art form IMO. You have to start there or in America, I think, when you mean movies as we perceive them today and what influenced the creativity involved the most. It's hard to overstate the influence of those works like Caligari and Golem and Nosferatu and etc. on the approach to film in whole across the globe up until today. Though they built on earlier work, they changed things in Germany and moved film so far forward. Look at Fritz Lang's 'Die Nibelungen' films from 1924. That's amazing stuff there too. Still amazing today, they were on another level. No one was creating stuff like that back then including Cecil B DeMille.

The French were putting the whole thing together in the late 1800's as to the techniques and mechanics, but not as we see films today so much. Jean Pierre Melville taught France how to do it 'new wave' style, but Jean Renior was already making landmark films before that. I was reading about movies somewhere, I forget where, and Orson Welles was asked which movies he would save if he knew they would all be destroyed except those he saved. He answered that 'Le Grand Illusion' was the first film that lept to his mind as an answer. Hard to overstate the French influence too.

We all know America and what we've done here.

Japan brought so much to films it's hard to overstate the importance there too. So much influence on every aspect of film.

Russia gave the world Tarkovsky and Eisenstein, that alone ranks them high.

Because of the work of the German Expressionists and films like Lang's 'Die Nibelungen' I think I would list them second on a list of contributions after America. You don't have the play of light and shadow of 'Citizen Kane' or 'Ugetsu' or etc. without them. The massive epic film starts there too, special effects stuff. So many levels of the creative aspect of film comes from that early German work.

It's hard to put the rest of a list together.

Giles
07-15-09, 08:18 AM
putting America 5th on the list of national contributions to the history of film is beyond laughable...it's just absurd. Please explain to us all how Hong Kong's HISTORY OF FILM is superior to that of the United States - where the medium was basically invented. This may be the single most retarded stance I've ever seen an internet elitist take :lol:

But given your obvious love of foreign cinema i'm surprised to not see Sweden on the list either.

:horsepoo:

Ash Ketchum
07-15-09, 09:47 AM
Why wouldn't it be? Did France invent movie technology? If not, what have they contributed?

The short answer is yes. Every special effects film owes a debt to Georges Melies. And every cinema verite or documentary film owes a debt to the Lumiere Bros.

PopcornTreeCt
07-15-09, 10:00 AM
France did invent movie technology. That's kinda funny, I was hoping Macross7 was being sarcastic.

superdeluxe
07-15-09, 10:13 AM
I'm currently NOT impressed with what America is putting out and calling 'cinema'

That wasn't the question that was asked.

Jaymole
07-15-09, 10:28 AM
That wasn't the question that was asked.

Exactly

Perhaps I should start another thread ranking countries as to their contribution to cinema at the present time...would be interesting to see the differences in those rankings as compared to these.

Giles
07-15-09, 10:52 AM
I interpreted "throughout history" to include the present - guess I was wrong in that thinking.

Solid Snake
07-15-09, 12:17 PM
It includes everything.

Ash Ketchum
07-15-09, 12:30 PM
I guess I have a different take on what "throughout history" means. My definition curiously deemphasizes the "what have you done for me lately?" notion of film history.

Giles
07-15-09, 12:31 PM
so yeah, maybe American got the ball rolling, but now a days the movies coming out of Hollywood are Asian remakes and/or product placement 'films' - so no I stand by my stance that I think American cinema has slipped and has become less revelent in 'world' cinema. And that's NOT a retarded response to the question addressed or my thoughts on the matter Brizz.

Solid Snake
07-15-09, 12:42 PM
Well at least you didn't put India on your list cuz they're modern America x 100.

Anyway....I still see a lot of great films here in the states. Yeah, we get crap here but...you know..we can't all have another golden age. It's hard to start that over.

Mabuse
07-15-09, 02:58 PM
France should be no higher than 4th. I fail to see any justification for ranking it higher than that. Despite Lumier, Mellies, and Gance the French contribution to the formative years of cinema is nothing compared to the inarguable top three:

1. USA
2. Russia
3. Germany

In france you can only point to distinct indivduals (as I did above). In USA, Russia, and Germany you can point to whole movements that got the ball rolling towards worldwide embrace of cinema as both popular art and entertainment. In Germay you have cinema as synthesis of design, in Russia you have cinema as a synthesis of construction (editing), and in USA you have cinema as the synthesis of industrial age production (film manufactured like a product). Notice I didn't mention any names. Edison, Chaplin, Eisenstein, Lang, etc. really have nothing to do with the big picture. These concepts are bigger and more fundamental than any one director or film movement. The french have no grand fundamental contribution they can claim (except I suppose the invention of the motion picture camera itself, which is contentious). I'll throw them a bone and put them 4th.

I love Japanese cinema, but their cinema (like their culture) was so isolated, and also so late to transition to sound that it's hard to say it had any influence on the development of cinema until the 1960's and by then it's a little late to really claim any historical importance. Admitadly I'm looking at cinema on a very long timeline. Those of you who think Japan is #2 because Star Wars was inspired by Kurosawa aren't looking "big picture" enough.

Supermallet
07-15-09, 03:37 PM
Why wouldn't it be? Did France invent movie technology? If not, what have they contributed?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinematograph

Tarantino
07-15-09, 03:47 PM
so yeah, maybe American got the ball rolling, but now a days the movies coming out of Hollywood are Asian remakes and/or product placement 'films' - so no I stand by my stance that I think American cinema has slipped and has become less revelent in 'world' cinema. And that's NOT a retarded response to the question addressed or my thoughts on the matter Brizz.

But you mysteriously left out Korea?

Giles
07-15-09, 03:53 PM
yeah, I did, didn't I, It was at one point in my top ten - maybe I'll just switch it with the US just to tick Brizz and Mabuse off. ;)

wendersfan
07-15-09, 05:47 PM
Seriously, I love German cinema (if that wasn't obvious) but there's no way I'd place it above the French. Renoir, Bresson, and Godard alone put France ahead of any country save the US. Of course, the US has Chaplin, Hawks, and Ford, so we "win". :)

Solid Snake
07-15-09, 05:48 PM
France should be no higher than 4th. I fail to see any justification for ranking it higher than that. Despite Lumier, Mellies, and Gance the French contribution to the formative years of cinema is nothing compared to the inarguable top three:

1. USA
2. Russia
3. Germany

In france you can only point to distinct indivduals (as I did above). In USA, Russia, and Germany you can point to whole movements that got the ball rolling towards worldwide embrace of cinemas a both popular art and entertainment. In Germay you have cinema as synthesis of design, in Russia you have cinema as a synthesis of construction (editing), and in USA you have cinema as the synthesis of industrial age production (film manufactured like a product). Notice I didn't mention any names. Edison, Chaplin, Eisenstein, Lang, etc. really have nothing to do with the big picture. These concepts are bigger and more fundamental than any one director or film movement. The french have no grand fundamental contribution they can claim (except I suppose the invention of the motion picture camera itself, which is contentious). I'll throw them a bone and put them 4th.

I love Japanese cinema, but their cinema (like their culture) was so isolated, and also so late to transition to sound that it's hard to say it had any influence on the development of cinema until the 1960's and by then it's a little late to really claim any historical importance. Admitadly I'm looking at cinema on a very long timeline. Those of you who think Japan is #2 because Star Wars was inspired by Kurosawa aren't looking "big picture" enough.

Dude, French New Wave.

Wikipedia says:

The movies featured unprecedented methods of expression, such as seven-minute tracking shots (like the famous traffic jam sequence in Godard's 1967 film Week End). Also, these movies featured existential themes, such as stressing the individual and the acceptance of the absurdity of human existence.

Many of the French New Wave films were produced on tight budgets; often shot in a friend's apartment, using the director's friends as the cast and crew. Directors were also forced to improvise with equipment (for example, using a shopping cart for tracking shots). The cost of film was also a major concern; thus, efforts to save film turned into stylistic innovations: for example, in Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless (À bout de souffle). After being told the film was too long and he must cut it down to one hour and a half he decided to remove several scenes from the feature using jump cuts. As they were filmed in one long take: parts that didn't work were simply cut right from the middle of the take, a practical decision and also a purposeful stylistic one.

The cinematic stylings of French New Wave brought a fresh look to cinema with improvised dialogue, rapid changes of scene, and shots that go beyond the common 360º axis. The camera was used not to mesmerize the audience with elaborate narrative and illusory images, but to play with and break past the common expectations of cinema. The techniques used to shock the audience out of submission and awe were so bold and direct that Jean-Luc Godard has been accused of having contempt for his audience. His stylistic approach can be seen as a desperate struggle against the mainstream cinema of the time, or a degrading attack on the viewer's naivete. Either way, the challenging awareness represented by this movement remains in cinema today. Effects that now seem either trite or commonplace, such as a character stepping out of her role in order to address the audience directly, were radically innovative at the time.

Classic French cinema adhered to the principles of strong narrative, creating what Godard described as an oppressive and deterministic aesthetic of plot. In contrast, New Wave filmmakers made no attempts to suspend the viewer's disbelief; in fact, they took steps to constantly remind the viewer that a film is just a sequence of moving images, no matter how clever the use of light and shadow. The result is a set of oddly disjointed scenes without attempt at unity; or an actor whose character changes from one scene to the next; or sets in which onlookers accidentally make their way onto camera along with extras, who in fact were hired to do just the same.

At the heart of New Wave technique is the issue of money and production value. In the context of social and economic troubles of a post-World War II France, filmmakers sought low-budget alternatives to the usual production methods. Half necessity and half vision, New Wave directors used all that they had available to channel their artistic visions directly to the theatre.

Mabuse
07-15-09, 05:58 PM
I would say that the French contibution of romantic realism or poetic realism in the early sound era was a greater contribution than the New Wave and yet I still wouldn't put France higher than 4th.

Clearly the difference in opinion we are all having stems from defining just what a "contribution to world cinema" is. Can it be a single film or filmmaker or something larger. I vote the latter.

Lemdog
07-15-09, 06:13 PM
I almost have to think that everyone has to rank 1-3 the same.

1. U.S.
2. France
3. Japan

In my opinion this is relatively uninteresting. What I really love to see is everyone's 4-10.

4. India - Gets no respect outside of India, but in regards to their contribution to World Cinema they can not be denied the four spot
5. HK/China/Taiwan - Very rich history, sadly it has been very poorly preserved.
6. Germany
7. U.S.S.R/Russia
8. Italy
9. U.K.
10. Sweden - Ingmar Bergman himself gets Sweden into the top 10.

Some people have mentioned Korea, and they deserve recognition for what they have done over the past 20 years, but the top 10 has too much of a head start.

Mabuse
07-15-09, 06:32 PM
Wow, I must be on Lemdog's ignore.

Please explain India to me. I fail to see how anything developed in Indian cinema has made a contribution to cinema outside of India. It seems pretty homogenious and is created within the culture for the almost exclusive consumption within the culture. But my knowledge of Indian cinema is limited to Mother India, Ray's films, and the legion of identical musicals they pump out today.

Solid Snake
07-15-09, 07:21 PM
Yeah...I don't really consider India's really given anything to cinema. I feel like a dick saying that..but...I don't see anything that they've really contributed either. I'd never put India in top 10. Hell...HK/China alone have made more impacts in Cinema than India could wish...and India makes soo so many films..

Drop
07-15-09, 07:39 PM
Clearly the difference in opinion we are all having stems from defining just what a "contribution to world cinema" is. Can it be a single film or filmmaker or something larger. I vote the latter.

Well define it then, this something larger. I don't think you'll find any major director not cite the French New Wave as a huge influence on themselves and cinema.

As for myself. I'd have to put US and France together. The reflected each other very well. US would go one way, France would take it in another, the US would take it somewhere else, and France would shift it again, and so on.

Then it gets hard between Germany Russia and Italy. They are all a very close second. I wish I had a better understanding of UK cinema because I don't know quite where to put them.

Of course in many ways those 5 all had incredibly important contributions, and they did come together to really bring us modern cinema.

Dr Mabuse
07-15-09, 07:49 PM
Alfred Hitchcock was a product of German Expressionism. For only one example.

His 'Psycho', most notably the shower scene, was a direct copy of expressionist film work. He got his idea for the shadow through the shower curtain, the most remembered scene, from Murnau's 'Nosferatu', he said so himself.

His entire career was building on his days working in Germany on films and what he learned there according to Hitchcock.

For only one example of the effect of those early German days.

'The Testament of Dr Mabuse'? Basically the archetype for all suspense movies to come?

'M'? Another archetype film. (yeah I know I'm a huge Lang fan)

But it is close for second place I guess, I'd still go Germany, but I love French cinema as much as anyone does and can understand that choice easily.

wvtechs
07-15-09, 09:01 PM
United States of America. Everybody else is competing for second.

Ditto.

HistoryProf
07-15-09, 09:58 PM
so yeah, maybe American got the ball rolling, but now a days the movies coming out of Hollywood are Asian remakes and/or product placement 'films' - so no I stand by my stance that I think American cinema has slipped and has become less revelent in 'world' cinema. And that's NOT a retarded response to the question addressed or my thoughts on the matter Brizz.

yes it is.

Lemdog
07-16-09, 01:43 AM
Please explain India to me. I fail to see how anything developed in Indian cinema has made a contribution to cinema outside of India. It seems pretty homogenious and is created within the culture for the almost exclusive consumption within the culture.

The wiki page gives a really quick and dirty overview but sadly it really does not go into any real detail. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinema_of_India

I based my statement on a really great dissertation that I read 3 years ago that describes the cross fertilization of influences between India and European cinema during the 1920s and 1930s and the influences India had on world cinema in the 1950s. It also went briefly into the power India cinema has in Eastern Europe, the Middle East and North Africa during the present day. For the life of me I can not remember its name, but I'll try to look it up tomorrow. After reading it I gained more interest in the topic and acquired films from India when I had the time/money to do so.

Do India's film reach the U.S. in any great numbers? The answer is obviously no. But the U.S. public's taste of films from other countries is very weak generally. Today India's films have broad audiences throughout south Asia (including China and the M.E.), Africa, Indonesia, as well as in many international film festivals. I could go on talking about other things that makes India's contribution to world cinema important, but it's late. If you would like to continue the conversation tomorrow, I'm in.

Ash Ketchum
07-16-09, 09:46 AM
The wiki page gives a really quick and dirty overview but sadly it really does not go into any real detail. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinema_of_India

I based my statement on a really great dissertation that I read 3 years ago that describes the cross fertilization of influences between India and European cinema during the 1920s and 1930s and the influences India had on world cinema in the 1950s. It also went briefly into the power India cinema has in Eastern Europe, the Middle East and North Africa during the present day. For the life of me I can not remember its name, but I'll try to look it up tomorrow. After reading it I gained more interest in the topic and acquired films from India when I had the time/money to do so.

Do India's film reach the U.S. in any great numbers? The answer is obviously no. But the U.S. public's taste of films from other countries is very weak generally. Today India's films have broad audiences throughout south Asia (including China and the M.E.), Africa, Indonesia, as well as in many international film festivals. I could go on talking about other things that makes India's contribution to world cinema important, but it's late. If you would like to continue the conversation tomorrow, I'm in.

Indian films were widely shown in countries with large Indian populations, including, of course, Guyana, but also Jamaica in the Caribbean. And, I'm guessing, countries in Africa like Uganda and South Africa. Or countries that, for some reason or other, clamored for Indian films, e.g. Uzbekistan. My point is that Indian films have been much more widely seen around the world than Americans would know. I meet immigrants in NYC all the time who recall seeing Bollywood films in their countries of origin.

Mabuse
07-16-09, 11:21 AM
So Germany developed an entire expresive mode of stylization that effected every part of the film, from production design to make-up to acting. And the Russians developed a style of editing that allowed the moving image to ellicit reactions from the audience just by the order that objects are shown, but Indian cinema is #2 below the USA because Indian cinema has a broad popular audience in todays global market? A market that accounts for less than 1% of worldwide ticket sales. That's not enough to be #2.

I'm not aware of any cross polinization between European and Indian cinema during the 20's and 30's. I'd be fascinated if you could find out more.

EDIT: After reading that Wikipedia article I would say that Italian neo-realism and American musicals, both from the post-war period, had the greatest external influence on Indian cinema. Internally, like Japan, it seams that India's cinema inspiration sprung from its "high" arts: Classic literature, ancient theater traditions, traditional musical storytelling. Conversely, American cinema sprung from the very low arts: Wild west shows, vaudville, cabaret, comics and crime magazines.

islandclaws
07-16-09, 12:52 PM
Personal Top 5:

- USA
- Japan
- Italy
- France
- Sweden

Senor Javi
07-16-09, 02:33 PM
1. United States
2. France
3. Germany
4. USSR / Russia
5. Italy
6. Japan
7. United Kingdom
8. Sweden
9. Hong Kong
10. Spain

This got difficult near the bottom, particularly picking number 10.

Hokeyboy
07-16-09, 02:47 PM
In many ways, this is the most unintentionally hilarious thread in DVD Talk history. :) "How in the world has Belgium contributed to the history and development of Belgian Ale?!?!?!"

A lot of film history is x begat y, y begat z, z begat a, and a begat neo-x, and thus the process repeats itself. German Expressionism led to American Film Noir, which was a striking influence on French New Wave, and the maverick late 60s/early 70s American "Cinéma Vérité"-styled moviemaking wouldn't exist without French New Wave or Italian neo-realism, etc. etc.

I don't know how I would "rank" the films in terms of contribution, because it seems like one huge interconnected experience. I'd rather have some Belgian ale.

Ash Ketchum
07-16-09, 04:31 PM
In many ways, this is the most unintentionally hilarious thread in DVD Talk history. :) "How in the world has Belgium contributed to the history and development of Belgian Ale?!?!?!"

I'd rather have some Belgian ale.

While watching a Tarantino movie shot in China taking place in Japan, with an American star...I think I'll join you.