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scottp120
09-30-08, 08:35 AM
I got a Sony BDP350 from Amazon yesterday and the resume feature on it doesn't work on blu-ray discs (at least not the first Godfather), but works fine with regular DVDs. I returned it this morning. Any other alternatives out now that can do a good upconvert of old DVDs, has a resume feature for both blu-ray and dvds and has a ethernet port on back for updates? I might just wait until the BDP550 comes out if that's any better.

rfduncan
09-30-08, 08:59 AM
PS3 does that now for most discs I've tried after you install the most recent BIOS updates. And the upconvert is pretty damn great.

Vipper II
09-30-08, 09:20 AM
Older Blu-ray discs - ones without BD-J - should resume like DVDs. Most newer BD-J titles allow resuming through the bookmark feature, but there are still some BD-J titles that don't support bookmarking, which means you can't resume. If the BDP350 is anything like the BDP300, though, you lose the ability to resume applicable titles after powering the unit off.

Drexl
09-30-08, 09:26 AM
Rather than trying to remember which discs have BD-J and which don't, I just consider the format not to have resume at all. Try it and see, but just tell yourself there's a chance it may not resume (unless you know the disc).

scottp120
09-30-08, 09:36 AM
I just don't see how hard it is to make a player that has the resume feature after the power is off. My sony upconverting DVD player remembers where it left off even if I unplug it. I probably will just wait for a player that is right or me. Thanks for the help. Doesn't the pioneer player have resume? The one that's $550 or so?

Drexl
09-30-08, 09:51 AM
I don't know either, but it's a different animal from DVD. With BD-J, it's not just reading the disc; it's running a program. I'm not sure why a player couldn't do something like hibernation on computers, where it would write the data in RAM to a chip and reload it when resuming.

Sometimes I wonder if it's a "security" risk, as if the data written on a chip could be used to hack the player.

MBoyd
09-30-08, 09:56 AM
I think it's the encoding of the Godfather. It wouldn't do it with my Panasonic, but How The West Was Won would.

The Man with the Golden Doujinshi
09-30-08, 11:06 AM
I don't know either, but it's a different animal from DVD. With BD-J, it's not just reading the disc; it's running a program. I'm not sure why a player couldn't do something like hibernation on computers, where it would write the data in RAM to a chip and reload it when resuming.

Sometimes I wonder if it's a "security" risk, as if the data written on a chip could be used to hack the player.

Unless you're physically unplugging it, it's probably still in stand-by mode.

kefrank
09-30-08, 11:24 AM
I just don't sees how hard it is to make a player that has the resume feature after the power is off. My sony upconverting DVD player remembers where it left off even if I unplug it. I probably will just wait for a player that is right or me. Thanks for the help. Doesn't the pioneer player have resume? The one that's $550 or so?
Not to be too harsh, but just because you don't understand it doesn't mean there aren't technical obstacles that make it difficult, if not impossible, to implement.

I've never understood the hang-up people have with this, maybe because I never cared all that much about the feature with DVD. It takes about 10 seconds to go through the scene selection menus and get back to anywhere in the movie and it's even faster for discs that support bookmarking.

MIS Director
09-30-08, 03:16 PM
Not to be too harsh, but just because you don't understand why lack of this is annoying, doesn't mean it actually isn't.

Goldberg74
09-30-08, 03:48 PM
My Magnovox BD player resumes on most discs.

Mr. Cinema
09-30-08, 04:02 PM
Most newer movies are including a bookmark feature to compensate for the lack of resume. I can't believe the resume feature is at the top of anyone's list. You returned the player because of that?

fujishig
09-30-08, 04:09 PM
One of my biggest gripes about the PS3 with it's original firmware was the lack of a resume function, even for regular DVDs... this was mostly due to watching TV series on DVD. I can see why this would be an annoyance, though I'm not sure I'd return a player because of it.

clckworang
09-30-08, 04:48 PM
The resume function was one of those things that I never really thought about until I realized that my Pioneer DVD player had this function a couple of years ago. It's very useful to have. Certainly not a deal-breaker, but very convenient.

Just realized that my PS3 has that function.

kefrank
09-30-08, 05:13 PM
Not to be too harsh, but just because you don't understand why lack of this is annoying, doesn't mean it actually isn't.
I understand why it would be annoying to some, but I can't see it being anything more than a minor annoyance at best. You really returned a player just because of that? That seems extreme to me, when there are alternative ways to get back to where you were that only take a few more clicks of the remote. I'd be happy to listen to your explanation though, if you'd like to help me understand.

scottp120
09-30-08, 05:30 PM
Yes I really did return it because I've gotten so used to my Sony DVD player that can easily pick up at the exact second where I left off, even when I change out discs. I have The Godfather collection and Dawn of the Dead (on order) so I guess I'm going to have to watch my DVD versions until a player comes along that will have a resume feature. I'll wait until the new models come out. I might be picky, but don't understand why a $100 DVD can do this flawlessly, yet a $300 blu ray player can't do this.

kefrank
09-30-08, 05:55 PM
Yes I really did return it because I've gotten so used to my Sony DVD player that can easily pick up at the exact second where I left off, even when I change out discs.
I guess I'm still at a loss. If I understand you correctly, you would rather forego all the advantages of Blu-ray than to just re-train yourself to use the bookmarking feature or the scene selection menu?

If you genuinely want to understand the technical reasons why no Blu-ray player has this capability (for all BDs) and possibly never will, you might try one of the insider threads at Blu-ray.com. That might help you decide if you should just go ahead and bite the bullet and live with it.

scottp120
09-30-08, 07:05 PM
I'm going to end up getting a blu ray player soon. With Texas Chainsaw Massacre coming out, I'm going to have to deal with it

Josh Z
09-30-08, 07:20 PM
Yes I really did return it because I've gotten so used to my Sony DVD player that can easily pick up at the exact second where I left off, even when I change out discs. I have The Godfather collection and Dawn of the Dead (on order) so I guess I'm going to have to watch my DVD versions until a player comes along that will have a resume feature. I'll wait until the new models come out.

Discs encoded with BD-Java cannot have the resume-play function, not on any player, ever. It's a limitation of the format design. If you're going to wait for a feature that will never exist on a Blu-ray player, then you're not ever going to own a Blu-ray player.

Superman07
09-30-08, 08:41 PM
Discs encoded with BD-Java cannot have the resume-play function, not on any player, ever. It's a limitation of the format design. If you're going to wait for a feature that will never exist on a Blu-ray player, then you're not ever going to own a Blu-ray player.

Thank you for stating that differently. Drexel said as much earlier in the post - it's the disc, not the player - but apparently that didn't come across to others discussing.

Rickaug
05-04-09, 11:30 AM
I bought the Sony BDP-S350, and was unpleasantly surprised by the lack of the resume feature on blu-ray movies, or at least the few I've rented since buying the unit. The feature is important for those who don't finish the movie in one sitting. This Forum explained the "why" (due to BD-J). I would think Sony and others could overcome this flaw.

SoSpacey
05-04-09, 12:50 PM
i could never understand why anyone would not watch an entire movie in one sitting. i could never split up movies like that. changes the whole perspective for me.

TV shows i could understand but it wouldn't be a deal breaker for me.

RockyMtnBri
05-04-09, 01:02 PM
Interesting - Star Trek TOS on blu-ray DOES resume in my Sony BDP-S350. I believe the discs do have BDLive functionality - is this synonymous with BD-J?

emachine12
05-04-09, 01:15 PM
BD-Live and BD-J are two different things.

BD-J is used in authoring of the interactive elements like menus and special features.

BD-Live is a the 2.0 spec of Blu-ray Disc and allows for internet connected features.

obidawsn
05-05-09, 05:26 AM
i could never understand why anyone would not watch an entire movie in one sitting. i could never split up movies like that. changes the whole perspective for me.

TV shows i could understand but it wouldn't be a deal breaker for me.

I used to do it all the time. If I wanted to watch a movie but never had the time to sit and watch the entire thing (especially when you're talking about the extended versions of Lord of the Rings), or if I was getting sleepy and decided to come back to it later. But then I got into TV on DVD, and I find myself hardly watching my movies (even though I keep buying them), because it's easier for me to watch 45 minutes at a time.

jack999
05-05-09, 09:55 AM
Discs encoded with BD-Java cannot have the resume-play function, not on any player, ever. It's a limitation of the format design. If you're going to wait for a feature that will never exist on a Blu-ray player, then you're not ever going to own a Blu-ray player.Are you positive about this? I was led to believe that a future firmware upgrade would fix this problem.

I enjoy my Sony BDPS550 but you wouldn't have wanted to hear me curse the first time I pressed the stop button and that resume prohibited message came up. To me it's a very basic feature of a playback device. The only playback device I've got that doesn't do it is a turntable (don't leave the needle on the disk).

This is a perfect example of a technology being released with major flaws. It's quite telling when there are inserts and messages on the disc itself warning that your player might not play the disc.

I'm enjoying Blu, but it needed more work.

Rickaug
05-11-09, 09:33 AM
RE: Blu-ray resume feature.
It's the disk that controls that feature. Non blu-ray movies resume where you stop them. Because of this, I would not buy blu-ray movies until the feature is added to disks(bookmark or whatever) and the cost comes down. Until then, I'll rent them.

lizard
05-11-09, 11:25 AM
While it is true that disc encoding controls the presence or absence of bookmarking, as Josh Z pointed out above the simple "stop-play-resume" of DVD is not possible with BD Java encoded discs. I presume that it is because the Java stuff has to load first (this is also why Java discs take longer to load than non-Java BDs).

I consider it a "defect" of the format design. Yes, they likely could have implemented a way to allow resume-play but chose not to. The idea was that bookmarking would suffice, even though it is MUCH more cumbersome than simple stop-play-resume.

TurboRex
05-11-09, 11:35 AM
I enjoy my Sony BDPS550 but you wouldn't have wanted to hear me curse the first time I pressed the stop button and that resume prohibited message came up. To me it's a very basic feature of a playback device. The only playback device I've got that doesn't do it is a turntable (don't leave the needle on the disk)..

Id have to agree with this.. what a crappy feature :(

Rickaug
05-13-09, 09:39 AM
RE: blu-ray players with internet connect (Sony BDP-S350, etal).

Any problems with connecting? What is the benefit of the internet connection?

Rickaug
05-13-09, 09:48 AM
RE:Blu-ray players with internet connectivity. (BDP-S350 and others)

Any problems with connecting and playing? What benefits does this internet connection suppose to do?

lizard
05-13-09, 12:23 PM
^The internet connection allows the player to update firmware directly, without having to use a firmware CD. It requires broadband internet service.

It also allows access to "BD live" special features on discs. These are interactive extras that can be viewed on the internet via the player. Only a relatively few BDs thus far have BD Live features and most have been underwhelming, according to reports I have read.

Stormprobe
08-09-11, 07:00 PM
Every DVD player I have ever owned has supported resuming, and my HD DVD player supported it as well. It is a mystery to me that a supposedly more capable player like Blu-Ray doesn't support such a basic feature. This is probably just a Sony thing as almost every Sony product I have had has had bad design in either the software, hardware, or simply being non-intuitive. They have their engineers design their products with no consumer input.

Ignohippo
08-09-11, 10:56 PM
Why not just wait for a chapter change and stop watching at that point. That way, it'd be easy enough to forward to that chapter the next time you watch the disc.

Regardless of the limitations of the disc itself, it seems it'd be easy enough for a company to make player that could recognize different discs and remember the chapters that were last played. It may take some kind of tiny flash drive, but it seems more than possible. I would think each disc would have it's own id somewhere in the code.

As long as we're talking about chapters, one thing I'd really like (as a parent) would be the ability to edit some chapters out while playing a disc (like you can do with some cd players where you can program only specific tracks to play).

Drexl
08-09-11, 11:20 PM
Every DVD player I have ever owned has supported resuming, and my HD DVD player supported it as well. It is a mystery to me that a supposedly more capable player like Blu-Ray doesn't support such a basic feature. This is probably just a Sony thing as almost every Sony product I have had has had bad design in either the software, hardware, or simply being non-intuitive. They have their engineers design their products with no consumer input.

It's due to BD-J. It wasn't enough to just make a disc like DVD but with better video and audio. They had to get fancy, so BD-J requires a program to run along with the video. BD+ also uses BD-J, and I believe BD-Live uses it as well. Apparently they can't resume to a running session once it starts, or perhaps they just won't for some reason (security?).

I agree they should have implemented a resume feature and made it mandatory along with standardized bookmarking and movable subtitles. But no, they were concerned with fancier menus, download-only features, picture in picture, and half-assed games.

lizard
08-10-11, 10:16 AM
^That sums it up pretty well. But I would like to point out that some BDs that don't use Java can be resumed and some recent releases (Disney?) have actually asked me if I wanted to resume the movie where I left off when I turned the player back on. I get the impression that some sort of resume could be implemented if the disc authors wanted to do it.

It sure would be nice if the designers of the format had thought to make resume mandatory though.

John Galt
08-10-11, 10:43 AM
^Criterions do as well. I think it's all about disc authoring as well; but I admittedly know nothing about the technical details behind it.

Jon2
08-11-11, 05:54 PM
..As long as we're talking about chapters, one thing I'd really like (as a parent) would be the ability to edit some chapters out while playing a disc (like you can do with some cd players where you can program only specific tracks to play).

There have been companies that have tried to bring this sort of "feature" to "concerned" parents. It's been a while, but I think they have all been (deservedly so) sued into oblivion by studios and filmmakers.

Let me say, as a parent, that I have never understood the need for such a feature. It makes more sense and is far easier to just not allow a child watch something with "objectionable" content.

Want to watch something with the kids, then watch something suitable for them. Don't try to dumb down something for adult tastes into something they can understand.

BTW, as for the BD resume function (or lack thereof) comments of this thread, as a Blu-ray owner... yeah that's a very minor peeve of mine, too. The talk of technical limitations is just that... talk. Excuses. Technical limitations are just that... limitations, not technical impossibilities. It isn't technically impossible to do, just very difficult.. and consequently more expensive.

bse
08-11-11, 06:37 PM
i could never understand why anyone would not watch an entire movie in one sitting. i could never split up movies like that. changes the whole perspective for me.

TV shows i could understand but it wouldn't be a deal breaker for me.

well, I used to never understand people who would pause or break up movies, but now with a 2 week old kid, the pause button and resume feedback feature is my best friend - the only way I get to watch stuff these days and for the near future.

Ignohippo
08-11-11, 10:04 PM
There have been companies that have tried to bring this sort of "feature" to "concerned" parents. It's been a while, but I think they have all been (deservedly so) sued into oblivion by studios and filmmakers.

Let me say, as a parent, that I have never understood the need for such a feature. It makes more sense and is far easier to just not allow a child watch something with "objectionable" content.

Want to watch something with the kids, then watch something suitable for them. Don't try to dumb down something for adult tastes into something they can understand.

BTW, as for the BD resume function (or lack thereof) comments of this thread, as a Blu-ray owner... yeah that's a very minor peeve of mine, too. The talk of technical limitations is just that... talk. Excuses. Technical limitations are just that... limitations, not technical impossibilities. It isn't technically impossible to do, just very difficult.. and consequently more expensive.

Let me give you an example: Iron Man. My kid was dying to see it and bugging the heck out of us daily. Two scenes made this one unwatchable for him to us: the scene where his friend gets killed in the cave because he wants to die to see his dead family; and the scene where the bad guys take the fathers from their families and are going to kill them.

It isn't "dumbing down" the movie. The movie is still the same withou those two scenes that I don't feel are appropriate for kids. As a responsible parent, I'm going to skip those scenes anyway, they might as well make it convenient for people to do so if they choose.

Giles
08-11-11, 10:46 PM
^Criterions do as well. I think it's all about disc authoring as well; but I admittedly know nothing about the technical details behind it.

I've noticed it also on Warner Bros. blurays too

professor chaos
08-12-11, 07:13 AM
My sony upconverting DVD player remembers where it left off even if I unplug it.

My VHS player does this as well.

TylerDurden_73
08-12-11, 09:29 AM
the latest OPPO BDP-93 has a resume featurebut doesn't work on BD-Java discs. I don't understand the difficulty of using a bookmark, especially since they are very common on BD-Java authored discs. Just a guess but I would say that any studio that is still using Java is still using bookmarks on their discs. Bookmark where you left off, when you resume go into the scene selection menu, find the bookmark section , and it pulls up all your book marks on that disc. Real Simple.

jack999
08-12-11, 09:46 AM
BTW, as for the BD resume function (or lack thereof) comments of this thread, as a Blu-ray owner... yeah that's a very minor peeve of mine, too. The talk of technical limitations is just that... talk. Excuses. Technical limitations are just that... limitations, not technical impossibilities. It isn't technically impossible to do, just very difficult.. and consequently more expensive.
It's a major peeve for me and I think (of course I have no inside info to support this) the reason auto-resume is difficult to do is a result of a poor marketing decision. The designers of blu-ray decided the public wanted fancy, animated menus and thus we have to load a software system to support the menus.

I have not encountered a single, slow loading menu system that I wouldn't gladly give up for a basic menu that allowed auto resume. All that overhead really accomplishes is to make the disc slow to load, difficult to use, and prevent auto-resume.

BTW, when I say basic menu, I'm not saying I don't want extras, I just want to select them from a basic menu and get one with the movie.

If you want to take polar opposites to compare, take T2-Skynet Edition and the blu-ray of The Searchers. T2 is the slowest loading disc I have and even requires the user to respond to a prompt when the disc can't find an internet connection. The Searchers loads up one static menu with a boatload of options. It loads quickly and you can auto-resume. I'll take The Searchers menu any day over T2.

After you've seen the eye candy of a highly programmed and animated big menu once or twice, I'll bet most of us are thinking "come on, come one, get on with it!"

lizard
08-12-11, 07:07 PM
...After you've seen the eye candy of a highly programmed and animated big menu once or twice, I'll bet most of us are thinking "come on, come one, get on with it!"Exactly right!

davidh777
08-12-11, 09:16 PM
i could never understand why anyone would not watch an entire movie in one sitting. i could never split up movies like that. changes the whole perspective for me.

TV shows i could understand but it wouldn't be a deal breaker for me.

well, I used to never understand people who would pause or break up movies, but now with a 2 week old kid, the pause button and resume feedback feature is my best friend - the only way I get to watch stuff these days and for the near future.

This. Parents would love to have enough time to watch a movie straight through but even an uninterrupted half-hour can feel like a luxury.

My sony upconverting DVD player remembers where it left off even if I unplug it.

My VHS player does this as well.

:lol: I wouldn't advise unplugging your VHS in mid-play, though. :)

PGHFlyer
08-13-11, 06:43 AM
Yeah, biggest format pet peeve for me here.

Closely followed by my specific pet peeve of the PS3 not providing a way to tell it to never connect to the internet. Nothing like sitting down to watch a show and it makes you wait 2-4 minutes so it can download a commercial for you to watch.

Alan Smithee
08-13-11, 07:56 AM
Every DVD player I have ever owned has supported resuming, and my HD DVD player supported it as well.

HD-DVD players will resume regular DVDs, but all HD-DVDs (with the exception of the small number of titles that don't use any 'advanced' features like popup menus) will start like they've just been loaded if you hit Stop and then Play again. Warner discs force you to wait through the FBI warning each time, and Universal discs force you to watch the Universal opening with the flying HD-DVD logo (every time I see that, I think "Yay! The format that lost!")

jjcool
08-13-11, 10:55 AM
Yeah, biggest format pet peeve for me here.



Agreed. That and the long ass wait time to load a disc.

Kevin M. Dean
08-13-11, 04:44 PM
Closely followed by my specific pet peeve of the PS3 not providing a way to tell it to never connect to the internet. Nothing like sitting down to watch a show and it makes you wait 2-4 minutes so it can download a commercial for you to watch.

Don't have a PS3, but does this setting not work?

http://www.oyah.net/howtoarticles/how-enable-or-disable-playstation-3-internet-connection


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