DVD Talk
How Do You Decide On the Right College Major? [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum
 
Best Sellers
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
The Longest Day
Buy: $54.99 $24.99
9.
10.
DVD Blowouts
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Alien [Blu-ray]
Buy: $19.99 $9.99
8.
9.
10.

PDA
DVD Reviews

View Full Version : How Do You Decide On the Right College Major?


My Other Self
04-23-08, 03:43 PM
Spring semester is winding down and Summer is starting up soon, so I thought this might be an interesting topic.

I'm still early on in my studies, but I'm trying to think ahead. Right now I'm at a local CC and plan on transferring after 2 years so I can get some pre-reqs out of the way. My problem lies in what to do after. I have no idea what I want to major in. Is that bad?

I know a lot of recent college grads who majored in generic degree-paths like Communication, History, and such. All of them are still working at retail stores or in other positions they held in college because they can't find a good job. I don't want that to happen to me. I'm paying for school out-of-pocket (I'm not eligible for financial aid until I'm 24.. long story).. so I want to make sure I'm getting myself into something I will have the most satisfaction in the long run. People say money isn't everything, and I can understand that.. but let's be honest. People need to live comfortably.

I've always had a more than strong interest in film (movies are my life), but I'm not all keen on the whole Hollywood scene. I don't want to be homeless struggling for a decent paying job trying to make it big. That's not my thing. I don't really care for SoCal all too much and honestly when I'm done with school I plan on moving out of California. There's a Film and Media Studies program at one of the local unviersities, which I think may be interesting, but let's be honest.. what kind of job prospects would there be for someone with a Bachelor's in a focus on film.. that's not in California? I would think slim-to-none. But mind you it's not a film production major, it's a study of film and the media as a whole.. still.

That's where my main interest lies. I'm a decent writer. And I enjoy history. I wasn't a math and science kid in high school, and as much as I'd love to just pick right up on it and try something hardcore like engineering I don't think it's feasible.

So after rifling through my post, how did you come about your college major? Was it something you've always wanted to do, and are you happy with your life?

Also, if anyone can assist me with any advice on my dilemma.. I'd appreciate it. :)

dick_grayson
04-23-08, 03:48 PM
in my case, you don't

4KRG
04-23-08, 03:52 PM
mcfly

It sounds to me like you need to have a sit down meeting with a college counselor and ask these questions and not to a bunch of boobs on a DVD forum.

Your major is most likely going to be irrelevant 5 years down the road after college, UNLESS, it is an engineering degree or something more meaningful than communications or art history :)

Having a successful career is more about who you know than what you know. My advice would be to get out in the world and meet as many people as you possibly can (college is a great place for that :) ).

Figure out what you think you want to do for a living and do what it takes to get you there. Understand that you won't start out on top, but 5-10 years of hard work will get you to where you want to be if you can figure out where you want to be and stay focused. Try to find a school that has an intern program. If you are a quality employee, being an intern is the best way to prove that to a potential employer.

My guess is your friends working retail are just lost souls and have no clue what they want out life (in realistic terms) or how to get there, so they work retail, yiiippeeeee :)

Bandoman
04-23-08, 03:55 PM
You can major in boobs? :banana:

j123vt_99
04-23-08, 03:56 PM
I don't think your major matters that much.. it's where your work experience is.. I know it can be a catch 22 since the work experience may based on the major. For example, my whole background is based on computers but I majored in English. I've never been denied of a computer job since I had so much experience in that field.. Whenever, an employer asked about the English major I explained that I didn';t like the computer classes my university had and really enjoyed English.

So don't think that just because you choose one major, you will be stuck in that field of employment for the rest of your life.

The Bus
04-23-08, 03:59 PM
Get a major that is broadly useful, where you have to learn either useful information or how to be useful. And one with girls in it.

John Galt
04-23-08, 04:02 PM
Most people choose after their sophomore year.

My advice is if you are worried about being able to find a job straight out of college, major in something that you know will lead to employment, such as sciences, engineering, or business. If you choose anything in the humanities (comm, pol sci, history, english) you better be prepared to work retail or go to grad school (this does not mean it is not possible to get a good job with one of these degrees, it just makes it a helluva lot harder). My next piece of advice is to do as many co-ops and internships as possible. This is the best way to network and make many important contacts. It is also the only thing that's kept me from working retail or going to grad school despite a humanities degree.

Trigger
04-23-08, 04:09 PM
There is no "right" major - just pick something easy. You can always change it later. Try Art History (kinda useless) or English (also kinda useless)... most people who are in your position usually end up with a major in Communications. It's versatile enough for getting you into film or journalism, but it's somewhat of a throw-away major. The math requirement is easy as well.

matta
04-23-08, 04:25 PM
There is no "right" major...

Yes there is. It's engineering. Everything else is a waste of time.

NotThatGuy
04-23-08, 04:32 PM
I went for the one with the hottest chicks, and then went from there. I didn't want to major in dance...so that's out. Teaching is great, but not for me. Next up was psychology and business. I did them. I took some pre-med, but I'd much rather do academic stuff instead of cutting people and whatnot.

kvrdave
04-23-08, 05:08 PM
I went with the one with hairy pitted women who played rugby. I was young. Avoid the mistakes of the young.

jonw9
04-23-08, 05:41 PM
Yes there is. It's engineering. Everything else is a waste of time.

Word! But his lack of interest in math my be a stumbling block.

What about packaging? It is like engineering lite, and there is a pretty high demand for graduates (at least from what I see around here).

I started out in elec. engineering, started considering environmental engineering, then briefly considered biology, then math, and back to elec. engineering.

My Other Self
04-23-08, 05:43 PM
Word! But his lack of interest in math my be a stumbling block.

What about packaging? It is like engineering lite, and there is a pretty high demand for graduates (at least from what I see around here).

I started out in elec. engineering, started considering environmental engineering, then briefly considered biology, then math, and back to elec. engineering.Well I've always found engineering to be interesting, depending what specific form of it, but being that I wasn't a strong math and science student in high school I thought it might not be worth the effort.

Then again, I had some crappy math and science teachers in high school and its been about 5 years since I've had ANY math or science. Maybe a fresh start could help..

OldDude
04-23-08, 06:39 PM
Word! But his lack of interest in math my be a stumbling block.

What about packaging? It is like engineering lite, and there is a pretty high demand for graduates (at least from what I see around here).



Or Materials & Logistics Management. Both my daughters graduated from that program although MSU may have changed the name since then.

They both got a lot of offers at graduation, and the more their companies outsource, the busier they are (and more secure their jobs).

I like matta's answer (engineering) but for those who don't like the intense math and science focus, MLM seems a pretty good field.

The Bus
04-23-08, 06:41 PM
Yes there is. It's engineering. Everything else is a waste of time.

I'd say math or physics.

matta
04-23-08, 07:24 PM
I'd say math or physics.

Well then you're wrong. My comment wasn't a negotiation, it was the answer.

matta
04-23-08, 07:28 PM
And by the way, I'm kidding. Although, engineering is a really good field because graduates have a lot of opportunities - probably more than any other field. Law schools love engineers, business schools love engineers, medical schools love engineers, consulting companies love engineers, manufacturing companies love engineers, etc.

Plus electrical engineering isn't that hard. El Scorcho did it.

D.Pham4GLTE (>60GB)
04-23-08, 07:28 PM
Or Materials & Logistics Management. Both my daughters graduated from that program although MSU may have changed the name since then.

They both got a lot of offers at graduation, and the more their companies outsource, the busier they are (and more secure their jobs).

I like matta's answer (engineering) but for those who don't like the intense math and science focus, MLM seems a pretty good field.

i never really liked math, or certain sciences like chemistry, but i ended up with an engineering major anyways. Funny thing is right now, i'm not using much of what i learned in school anyways. but it did help me get a job.

al_bundy
04-23-08, 07:30 PM
if you go into anything like literature, history, archeology or some other pure liberal art or science be prepared to go all the way for a phd to do anything other than get coffee for the phd's

Tracer Bullet
04-23-08, 07:41 PM
if you go into anything like literature, history, archeology or some other pure liberal art or science be prepared to go all the way for a phd to do anything other than get coffee for the phd's

:lol:

Like liberal arts PhDs can afford store-prepared coffee.

ivelostr2
04-23-08, 07:47 PM
OK, this is what I did, I picked a major before I even went, then I changed 8+ times, graduated with 2 degrees 8 years later, then decided I enjoyed psychology, reenrolled, and declared Psychology my major...Good luck!

ivelostr2
04-23-08, 07:48 PM
There is no "right" major - just pick something easy. You can always change it later. Try Art History (kinda useless) or English (also kinda useless)... most people who are in your position usually end up with a major in Communications. It's versatile enough for getting you into film or journalism, but it's somewhat of a throw-away major. The math requirement is easy as well.


LOL...my first 2 degrees were art history and English...

hitmanjules
04-23-08, 08:47 PM
Can anyone give any examples of communication graduates having any success outside of jobs they could have gotten fresh out of high school?

jonw9
04-23-08, 08:49 PM
i never really liked math, or certain sciences like chemistry, but i ended up with an engineering major anyways. Funny thing is right now, i'm not using much of what i learned in school anyways. but it did help me get a job.

Isn't that what a degree is? Not what you learn, but showing you have the ability to do so. Most places will teach you their method of doing things, and a college degree just shows you have the capability of learning the tasks.

I like OldDude's suggestion. I think they call it "Supply Chain Logistics" now.
http://www.bus.msu.edu/msc/documents/Supply_Chain_Logistics.pdf

In addition MSU offers an engineering management degree. That is half engineering, half business. I think it may be called something like applied engineering as well.

matta
04-23-08, 09:13 PM
I like OldDude's suggestion. I think they call it "Supply Chain Logistics" now.
http://www.bus.msu.edu/msc/documents/Supply_Chain_Logistics.pdf


Lots of schools offer that degree as Supply Chain Management and Operations Management. Though, if you're going to do that, you might as well get an industrial engineering degree.

Stanford has a pretty decent program out there in Cali. Of course, it can't compete with Georgia Tech's program (#1 nationally for 18 consecutive years), but who really can?


http://img175.imageshack.us/img175/9217/frontofshirt11ra0.jpg

fumanstan
04-23-08, 09:31 PM
If you can't find anything that matches what you hope you might do in the future, i'd say to pick something practical that could help you in other fields.

I tried computer science since I was handy with computer stuff and realized I couldn't program worth a damn. I switched to Economics since I had already done a lot of the math requirements in CS that carried over, plus I figured doing something somewhat resembling business would be useful. Of course, now i'm a network administrator and ended up doing what I loved to do anyway. Go figure.

story
04-23-08, 10:21 PM
I'm truly the only person I know who had an idea of what he wanted to major in as he started at the University of Minnesota, mixed required generals with classes in the major, met with the major chair, signed up that first year, and then subsequently graduated in four years flat.

Zee
04-23-08, 10:30 PM
This is a dilemma I'll never personally understand, as I always knew I wanted to be an actor...so I studied acting, and now that's what I do.

I think the only way to go about your life is to do what you love...I know that's not always practical, but if film is your passion I think you should find a way to include it in your studies and in your career. Have you ever thought about Entertainment Business Management? Or just business in general? You could open your own movie theatre, become an agent, get into casting, be a producer, entertainment lawyer...the options are endless. I just think there's no point in studying something that is not going to be personally fulfilling and satisfying.

matta
04-23-08, 10:33 PM
I'm truly the only person I know who had an idea of what he wanted to major in as he started at the University of Minnesota, mixed required generals with classes in the major, met with the major chair, signed up that first year, and then subsequently graduated in four years flat.

That was actually pretty common from what I saw. I knew very few people who changed majors in college (and those that did were forced to by the school because of grades).

matta
04-23-08, 10:36 PM
I think the only way to go about your life is to do what you love...I know that's not always practical, but if film is your passion I think you should find a way to include it in your studies and in your career. Have you ever thought about Entertainment Business Management? Or just business in general? You could open your own movie theatre, become an agent, get into casting, be a producer, entertainment lawyer...the options are endless. I just think there's no point in studying something that is not going to be personally fulfilling and satisfying.

Business is the absolute worst degree for an undergraduate. It's the most useless and most common degree out there.

If you want to go into business, start with a more technical field in the area you want to study (e.g. psychology for marketing, econ for finance) then move into the field with an MBA.

Zee
04-23-08, 10:41 PM
Business is the absolute worst degree for an undergraduate. It's the most useless and most common degree out there.

If you want to go into business, start with a more technical field in the area you want to study (e.g. psychology for marketing, econ for finance) then move into the field with an MBA.

Told you I had no idea what I was talking about. I sleep by day and live in a fantasy world by night, so I pretty much know nothing about the real world. :lol:

I stand by my point about doing what you love though. Don't settle, man.

ivelostr2
04-24-08, 06:05 AM
Can anyone give any examples of communication graduates having any success outside of jobs they could have gotten fresh out of high school?

My sister had a communications degree and then went to law school

matta
04-24-08, 07:38 AM
My sister had a communications degree and then went to law school

Law school will take pretty much any degree, so I don't think the "communications" portion helped her as much as the "degree" portion.

jonw9
04-24-08, 07:45 AM
Lots of schools offer that degree as Supply Chain Management and Operations Management. Though, if you're going to do that, you might as well get an industrial engineering degree.

Stanford has a pretty decent program out there in Cali. Of course, it can't compete with Georgia Tech's program (#1 nationally for 18 consecutive years), but who really can?

I am sure there are plenty of schools with the SCM degree, I was just showing MSU because I am not familiar with other (West Coast) programs.

I am pretty sure, however, that your choices for a packaging program are more limited. If I recall MSU and VTech are among the top.

criptik28
04-24-08, 08:07 AM
Yes there is. It's engineering. Everything else is a waste of time.

:up: :up:

C-Mart
04-24-08, 11:39 AM
Engineering is incredibly diverse. I have a Civil Engineering degree and ended up as a transportation engineer (I design traffic signals, striping, ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems), etc... It's decent and there aren't a huge amount of complex calculations involved like there would be with fluids or structures. Mostly it is just knowing where to look in the codes and apply it to the design.

Personally I am not that happy and not that excited about the work. That could be because of the company that I work for... that will be remedied soon however. The money is good, but once I can afford to do something else I will.

That being said, if you are going to go into engineering get all the math and science that you can out of the way in JC. I had all of my GE science and math (up through calculus) out of the way, but I didn't know that I would need it until late in my 1st year at JC, which made my 1st year pretty much a waste.

Stay away from mechanical engineering as they are the most technical (math and science heavy). You will still have to take some ME classes, but nothing like what the ME majors have to take. I failed every ME classes that I had to take at least once, and was on the verge of changing majors because of it. I'm glad I stuck with it though, as the money is great and there are plenty of jobs available.

I went to Cal Poly Pomona, and feel that it is the best (or one of the best) engineering schools in CA.

Nausicaa
04-24-08, 02:16 PM
I was in the same boat, now I'm a senior getting my degree in Accounting. I can't say I love it, but it's not bad.

Being in school and not knowing what you want to study is really frustrating. I was heading out of my sophmore year and I still was just as unsure as day one. As the OP pointed out, I saw what happened to college graduates with easier, "undecided" degrees like Communications, History, or Philosophy. They all struggled finding (good) work after graduating.

I decided on accounting because my school has a reputable program in the field, and I knew I would probably be able to land a well-paying job out of after graduating. It's also worth mentioning that what you do outside the classroom is just as, if not more important that the classes you're taking. Internships and volunteer experience are very important, and will help fill out that resume come senior year.

My talent is art, but I had a feeling I would end up hating it if I went to art school. I figure I can pursue these sorts of interests in the future, but right now it's most important that I get a job.

My Other Self
06-18-12, 02:02 AM
Had to bump this because I may be at yet another stumbling block. I haven't gotten too far since I initially started this thread. I've been dereailed a number of times to the point where I was either taking only one class at a time or none at all. I've been able to really buckle down this semsester and the upcoming Fall to the point where I'll be done with my lower-division courses by next year. So, now, Fall of 2013 would be when I start at a 4-year school.

I've qualified for a tuition waiver while going to community college since I don't make much money at my current job, but that's only for CC students. After I'm done with my lower division I'm on my own in terms of financing my education, so more likely than not, I'll be relying on loans. The problem is I really had no idea how expensive it truly is. If I stay here in California, it's about $25,000 a year. So I'll be $50k in debt with no real direction. I'm having a problem justifying the cost.

I want to really finish my degree but I also don't want to be swimming in debt just to get it. I've yet to decide on a major even after all is said and done. I'm pretty much just going to be getting general education credits out of the way. More likely than not I'll be in a liberal arts major of sorts because it's impossible for me to do any more hard sciences or math than I already have. It's a bear for me to the point where I won't succeed. Engineering and math related majors are out. Doesn't leave me with much else.

I work in healthcare now and the only thing it's supplied me with is job stability. I don't like the field, I'd prefer something else, but I don't know how I'll get there. Now, with the cost calculated in, it almost seems like a waste of time.

Is $50k in loans (since there's no other way for me to finance my education) with a broad degree worth it? I had no idea it would've gotten this expensive. I've been spoiled getting my education pretty much paid for (I pay out of pocket for books and other related campus expenses), but now, I would hate to think that I've been wasting my time.

gmanca
06-18-12, 02:32 AM
I come to what I thought before, that getting an AA degree to use with your experience would be the "best" option.

As you mention, those nebulous liberal arts degrees only help when there's enough of a workforce that management is needed. And either way you will have to pay out of pocket so unless you can get a clean transfer into a degree that you know you can do(what happened to Information Systems?) the quickest way of knowing whether the past 4 years in healthcare are worth a damn is if you have a degree to go with it.

If you can't get a better job with those two, then you know you'll need a better degree.

dvdjunkie32
06-18-12, 08:18 AM
Had to bump this because I may be at yet another stumbling block. I haven't gotten too far since I initially started this thread. I've been dereailed a number of times to the point where I was either taking only one class at a time or none at all. I've been able to really buckle down this semsester and the upcoming Fall to the point where I'll be done with my lower-division courses by next year. So, now, Fall of 2013 would be when I start at a 4-year school.

I've qualified for a tuition waiver while going to community college since I don't make much money at my current job, but that's only for CC students. After I'm done with my lower division I'm on my own in terms of financing my education, so more likely than not, I'll be relying on loans. The problem is I really had no idea how expensive it truly is. If I stay here in California, it's about $25,000 a year. So I'll be $50k in debt with no real direction. I'm having a problem justifying the cost.

I want to really finish my degree but I also don't want to be swimming in debt just to get it. I've yet to decide on a major even after all is said and done. I'm pretty much just going to be getting general education credits out of the way. More likely than not I'll be in a liberal arts major of sorts because it's impossible for me to do any more hard sciences or math than I already have. It's a bear for me to the point where I won't succeed. Engineering and math related majors are out. Doesn't leave me with much else.

I work in healthcare now and the only thing it's supplied me with is job stability. I don't like the field, I'd prefer something else, but I don't know how I'll get there. Now, with the cost calculated in, it almost seems like a waste of time.

Is $50k in loans (since there's no other way for me to finance my education) with a broad degree worth it? I had no idea it would've gotten this expensive. I've been spoiled getting my education pretty much paid for (I pay out of pocket for books and other related campus expenses), but now, I would hate to think that I've been wasting my time.


You could try what I did. Major in English with an emphasis on technical writing. It's pretty much the only form of writing that's in demand, and the pay can be up to $50 an hour if you're good. Anyone who thinks they are going to make a living as a poet or creative writer is delusional.

My Other Self
06-18-12, 10:12 AM
I come to what I thought before, that getting an AA degree to use with your experience would be the "best" option.

As you mention, those nebulous liberal arts degrees only help when there's enough of a workforce that management is needed. And either way you will have to pay out of pocket so unless you can get a clean transfer into a degree that you know you can do (what happened to Information Systems?) the quickest way of knowing whether the past 4 years in healthcare are worth a damn is if you have a degree to go with it.That's the problem, I couldn't do it. I couldn't do it in the sense that the material either went over my head or I just couldn't bring myself to focus on dry material to the point that I didn't care. My CC has short-time classes in the evenings for 5 weeks and I tried one to get a sample of the material and it was so incredibly boring. Introductory or not, it's not what I envision for myself.

I'm in healthcare now, sure, but no matter what industry it is it will always be the same line of work. It doesn't matter if I'm doing what I'm doing now in this field or in another. I'll be sitting in a cubicle in front of a computer.

Doing what I do now, I can work in to a mid-level job so long as I keep myself on the up-and-up and just continue doing what I do now. I was co-workers with someone who had a BS in Biology and recently got in to an analyst position, which is the path a lot of people with any degree can get into with experience. Healthcare Analysts are always in demand in this field.

Nothing else has changed, though, there's no AA that's worth my time or that will corroborate with my current job to advance me in the field.

My main thing now is just cost and finding a path to a career while grasping something I'm good at. Seems like no matter what I'll be in debt I just don't want it to be for nothing.

TruGator
06-18-12, 12:31 PM
Is $50k in loans (since there's no other way for me to finance my education) with a broad degree worth it? I had no idea it would've gotten this expensive. I've been spoiled getting my education pretty much paid for (I pay out of pocket for books and other related campus expenses), but now, I would hate to think that I've been wasting my time.

This thread (http://forum.dvdtalk.com/other-talk/602405-there-some-kind-student-loan-bail-out-anything-help-debt.html) is worth reading.

cliffzig
06-18-12, 01:14 PM
How about law enforcement? I make more than most of my former peers who got college degrees. And as an added bonus, my department pays for 100% of my tuition and books. So far I am up to an A.A., gearing up to snag my B.A. pretty soon.

And my job is never boring or mundane, I assure you!

Osiris3657
06-18-12, 01:24 PM
This thread (http://forum.dvdtalk.com/other-talk/602405-there-some-kind-student-loan-bail-out-anything-help-debt.html) is worth reading.

He posted in it.

TruGator
06-18-12, 02:47 PM
He posted in it.

I guess his question was rhetorical then, since he should already know the answer. ;)

cungar
06-18-12, 02:47 PM
This is a dilemma I'll never personally understand, as I always knew I wanted to be an actor...so I studied acting, and now that's what I do.


What restaurant do you wait tables at?

JumpCutz
06-18-12, 03:15 PM
:lol:

FRwL
06-18-12, 03:20 PM
http://www.careermemes.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/actor_career_meme-600x450.jpg

fujishig
06-18-12, 03:21 PM
How about law enforcement? I make more than most of my former peers who got college degrees. And as an added bonus, my department pays for 100% of my tuition and books. So far I am up to an A.A., gearing up to snag my B.A. pretty soon.

And my job is never boring or mundane, I assure you!

I would agree with this, if you have any interest in law enforcement. In CA it pays well, the pension (as of right now) is incredible, and even with all the anti-public-union talk it seems like firefighters and police pensions are untouchable politically. But it is hazard pay, so there's that.

FRwL
06-18-12, 03:22 PM
I went to Cal Poly Pomona, and feel that it is the best (or one of the best) engineering schools in CA.

My friend went there for Architecture, is that good too? He graduated 06.



My talent is art, but I had a feeling I would end up hating it if I went to art school. I figure I can pursue these sorts of interests in the future, but right now it's most important that I get a job.

Me too, and i go to Northridge. Trouble is others i spoke to say they're there for "fun" which makes me delusioned since i'm there for... yaknow making money. What sorts of jobs does Illustration hail these days? I've managed to make a normal buck selling my drawings around community center type places but that's me literally being a salesman.

You could try what I did. Major in English with an emphasis on technical writing. It's pretty much the only form of writing that's in demand, and the pay can be up to $50 an hour if you're good. Anyone who thinks they are going to make a living as a poet or creative writer is delusional.

What if they're... really .... really .... good, like reading/writing on message boards , reading books, for over 10 years. ;)

Shazam
06-18-12, 03:54 PM
How about law enforcement? I make more than most of my former peers who got college degrees. And as an added bonus, my department pays for 100% of my tuition and books. So far I am up to an A.A., gearing up to snag my B.A. pretty soon.

And my job is never boring or mundane, I assure you!
Chicks love cops. I used to have two as neighbours, one's in jail because child porn, the other used to have really hot sluts come over, also he had sex with the window open (I'm presuming with the really hot sluts).

My Other Self
06-18-12, 04:11 PM
I guess his question was rhetorical then, since he should already know the answer. ;)Well, to be fair, that guy was whining about debts. My advice was to go to JC like I have. Which I fully endorse, it makes the most sense financially. There's a big difference in cost when it comes to Uni and CC which honestly, I didn't realize it was THAT big of a difference.

Just makes you open your eyes more on what I'm actually doing in school. Only I can forget out what I'm going to do with my life and if it comes to almost $50,000 in debt it better pay off. :lol:

FRwL
07-08-12, 01:00 AM
Uh i'm going to bump this thread up because i want to ask, what jobs does having an Art in Illustration BA provide? I feel like i'm running a joke show and the classmates i ask around say they're in there for "fun" which makes me feel really disullusioned.

I feel like doing a job in the movie industry too, but if not then doing comics would suffice.

My Other Self
07-08-12, 01:13 AM
Uh i'm going to bump this thread up because i want to ask, what jobs does having an Art in Illustration BA provide? I feel like i'm running a joke show and the classmates i ask around say they're in there for "fun" which makes me feel really disullusioned.

I feel like doing a job in the movie industry too, but if not then doing comics would suffice.A BA in the Arts isn't what's going to get you a job illustrating comic books. Most degrees are there to show you have the drive to complete something. If your skills suck, then obviously the degree is worthless. If you're a good artist, the degree is still not the ticket to illustrating for Marvel or DC.

Maybe if you go to a very prestigious art program you can get connections (college I'm told is who you know, not what yo know) and show how talented you are or get to know people who know people "in the industry".

It's been my plan for years to break it in to the entertainment industry behind the scenes to some capacity but because I don't live where all the action is it's more of a pipe dream.

Troy Stiffler
07-08-12, 09:48 AM
My advice: pick something and stick with it. If you really want, you can get a job stocking shelves at Target. Stick with it for ten years, and you'll be the shift manager, making more money than 'educated' folks who jump from job-to-job every few years. Plus, you wouldn't lose those years in college.

That's my view on things, anyways.

Troy Stiffler
07-08-12, 09:59 AM
Uh i'm going to bump this thread up because i want to ask, what jobs does having an Art in Illustration BA provide? I feel like i'm running a joke show and the classmates i ask around say they're in there for "fun" which makes me feel really disullusioned.

I feel like doing a job in the movie industry too, but if not then doing comics would suffice.

Just do it. There's plenty of art jobs out there (I assume you're in Los Angeles). Nothing glamorous. But there's tons of people out there who illustrate, work in advertising, video games, etc.

It's all in the portfolio. Compile an amazing portfolio to impress the people hiring.

PopcornTreeCt
07-08-12, 10:03 AM
My advice: pick something and stick with it. If you really want, you can get a job stocking shelves at Target. Stick with it for ten years, and you'll be the shift manager, making more money than 'educated' folks who jump from job-to-job every few years. Plus, you wouldn't lose those years in college.

That's my view on things, anyways.

That sounds like the worst fucking thing in the world.

Nausicaa
07-08-12, 10:18 AM
Just do it. There's plenty of art jobs out there (I assume you're in Los Angeles). Nothing glamorous. But there's tons of people out there who illustrate, work in advertising, video games, etc.

It's all in the portfolio. Compile an amazing portfolio to impress the people hiring.

Yeah, I read my post earlier in the thread from four years ago, and I laughed at the naivite on display. Do not follow the advice to do something 'practical' if you are passionate about art and have the skills. Posters upthread are talking about comic books - yeah probably not going to happen unless you are really good. But there are tons of jobs out there for people with art skills. Sure, you might not make tons of money (although if you are good the opportunity is certainly there), but you will be doing something potentially interesting all the creative industry types I know, they have by far the most relaxed and flexible schedules.

I foolishly believed the 'artists can't get jobs nonsense'. And it turns out its just not true.

sherm42
07-08-12, 10:47 AM
Read this book. It is supposed to be pretty good in helping select college majors:

http://www.amazon.com/Worthless-ebook/dp/B006N0THIM/?_encoding=UTF8&tag=newnormus-20&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325

Tarantino
07-08-12, 12:14 PM
I saw this thread not realizing it was old and thought..."matta's back? Is there an election?" Alas...it was not to be.