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R.I.P. Punk Rock (1977-2007) [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum
 
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View Full Version : R.I.P. Punk Rock (1977-2007)


kenbuzz
11-01-07, 02:51 PM
According to today's issue of the IU campus newspaper, the Indiana Daily Student, punk rock has apparently died.

http://img232.imageshack.us/img232/4535/punkrockxw0.jpg

:rock:http://www.yanceyware.com/support/images/smilies/music/drums.gif:rock:
:rock2:http://www.ataricommunity.com/forums/images/smilies/addon%20smilies/punk.gif:rock2:

:sad:

dick_grayson
11-01-07, 02:52 PM
punk died over 20 years ago

aintnosin
11-01-07, 02:52 PM
Having just seen the Sex Pistols on the Tonight Show shilling for Guitar Hero 3, I would have to agree.

dork
11-01-07, 02:57 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071101/ap_on_en_mu/ex_punk_manager_slaying_3

kenbuzz
11-01-07, 02:57 PM
Punk, an abbreviated history
1965-66: U.S. garage punk emerges, including Count Five, The Monks, The Sonics and The Barbarians.
1967: First Velvet Underground album
1974: The group Television begins playing at New York venue CBGB
1976: Ramones release self-titled album and tour England
1976: Sex Pistols release "Anarchy in the U.K."
1977: The Clash releases self-titled album 1978: Sex Pistols break up, starting "post-punk" era
Early 1980s: Music gets "hardcore," with bands such as Black Flag, Circle Jerks
Early 1990s: Punk music goes grunge, with bands such as Nirvana, Green Day
1991: Documentary "1991: The Year Punk Broke," released, indicating punk's move from its roots
Late 1990s: Punk music turns safe and no longer angry, with bands such as Blink-182
November 2007: Indiana student newspaper declares punk dead. Move on, nothing to see here.

Source: IU history of music professor Andy Hollinden

dork
11-01-07, 03:00 PM
punk died over 20 years ago
And every year since, whenever a disillusioned eighteen-year-old needs a hook for an article.

Minor Threat
11-01-07, 03:09 PM
<---------- Still alive.....

kvrdave
11-01-07, 03:26 PM
Didn't they just rename it to "Garage rock" or "Seattle rock" or something like that? I thought it included the genre of crappy, gravely voice guys that you can't actually hear, but are making noise.

Mopower
11-01-07, 03:32 PM
Good riddance.

El Scorcho
11-01-07, 03:33 PM
It's been falling apart to half time for a while now.

General Zod
11-01-07, 03:35 PM
As I think happens with all music*.. if you listen long enough you will learn to like it. My Ex-wife was a punk rocker (With blue spiked hair, leather, etc) and she always listened to Bad Religion and Dead Kennedys and stuff like that and after hearing it over and over again I actually started thinking the music was OK.. Thank goodness she is my ex-wife and I am now cured :)

* = Except country.

7Keys
11-01-07, 03:36 PM
Punk is not dead, it just sucks right now. And for the last decade or two.

Minor Threat
11-01-07, 03:37 PM
Punk is not dead, it just sucks right now. And for the last decade or two.


It's also really underground right now.....

Drop
11-01-07, 03:42 PM
It's all just Rock n Roll, which should really be catergorized as Post-Blues.

El Scorcho
11-01-07, 03:43 PM
And that should be classified as post-classical.

AGuyNamedMike
11-01-07, 03:45 PM
punk died over 20 years ago

At least.

slymer
11-01-07, 04:03 PM
Punk is not dead, it just sucks right now. And for the last decade or two.

There's still alot of good punk music being made. I'm listening to some American Steel right now.

dom56
11-01-07, 04:10 PM
I just pick up The Ramones It's Alive 1974-1996 DVD last week. :( :D

Gabba Gabba Hey, Gabba Gabba Hey.

JasonF
11-01-07, 04:25 PM
Is punk dead? I think this video answers that question:

wJk_kY2WY9E

Numanoid
11-01-07, 04:43 PM
OK, I'm sure Giantrobo will attack me for asking, but just exactly HOW does this not belong in Music Talk?

Sean O'Hara
11-01-07, 04:53 PM
Jolie Holland said in an interview a few years ago that no self-respecting punk makes punk music these days. They all go into alt-country like Ryan Adams, or roots-rock like Jack White, or some off-the-wall genre like the Dresden Dolls.

johnglass
11-01-07, 05:57 PM
Chris must be devastated.

covenant
11-01-07, 06:15 PM
campus newspaper,

Fail.

atlantamoi
11-01-07, 06:20 PM
I thought it included the genre of crappy, gravely voice guys that you can't actually hear, but are making noise. I believe that's called "Shit Rock".

I thought we were living in a post-post-post-post-post-punk world.

calhoun07
11-01-07, 06:24 PM
Having just seen the Sex Pistols on the Tonight Show shilling for Guitar Hero 3, I would have to agree.

I was thinking of this before I even clicked on the thread to read it. That one event should be the gravestone for the punk rock movement.

JasonF
11-01-07, 06:52 PM
Having just seen the Sex Pistols on the Tonight Show shilling for Guitar Hero 3, I would have to agree.

Is it playing the Tonight Show that's non-punk, or licensing the song to a video game?

aintnosin
11-01-07, 06:57 PM
Is it playing the Tonight Show that's non-punk, or licensing the song to a video game?
Shilling for the game is the seriously non-punk. Then again, punk is about thumbing your nose about society's expectations, so maybe it's punk after all.

JasonF
11-01-07, 07:29 PM
Shilling for the game is the seriously non-punk. Then again, punk is about thumbing your nose about society's expectations, so maybe it's punk after all.

There was always a "stick a finger in the establishment's eye" element to punk, but I always thought a better distillation of the punk attitude was "do what you want to do, not what someone else says you should want to do." The Ramones didn't rock because they wanted to stick it to a society that was listening to John Denver and the Captain & Tenille. They rocked because that was the kind of music they liked, and who cares if nobody else was playing it.

Nick Danger
11-01-07, 08:29 PM
I've said it before. Punk rock is about anger, youth, and rebellion. It isn't any of that if it's the music your Dad listens to on the oldies stations.

You young folks need to go and create your own music.

freshticles
11-02-07, 02:10 AM
Punk's not dead. It's just that your average college kids don't listen to Greenday, Good Charlotte or Simple Plan anymore and are too stupid to realize that ain't punk. People who listen to punk rock don't go to college.,...

boston george
11-02-07, 02:31 AM
There is still plenty of punk rock and hardcore out there. It's just underground.

The guy who wrote that article should come to Indy this (and EVERY) Saturday night for Punk Rock Night at the Melody Inn. Awesome bands every week from all over the country (and sometimes Japan)

http://www.punkrocknight.com/images/dispbanner.gif

Rogue588
11-02-07, 04:48 AM
Seeing Dane Cook on Conan wearing a shirt that said "Punk Rock" was..

atlantamoi
11-02-07, 07:23 AM
People who listen to punk rock don't go to college.,... :hscratch:

LiquidSky
11-02-07, 07:40 AM
People who listen to punk rock don't go to college.,...

:lol: Let's see, in college I listened to The Sex Pistols, Black Flag, Circle Jerks, Suicidal Tendencies, etc.

Sean O'Hara
11-02-07, 09:06 AM
People who listen to punk rock don't go to college.,...

I think someone needs to watch SLC Punk!

lordzeppelin
11-02-07, 10:24 AM
Having just seen the Sex Pistols on the Tonight Show shilling for Guitar Hero 3, I would have to agree.

I never understood the fascination, adoration, and ultimate crowning of the Sex Pistols as the alpha and omega of Punk. In fact, I think they were fucking horrid, and the declaration that punk died when they broke up (I'm talking general consensus, not just in this thread) is absolutely absurd. The abbreviated history of Punk from the first page of this thread sickened me...no mention of Iggy and the Stooges? (no offense to the poster, I know you pasted from a source)

For what it's worth, Punk is not dead (IMO), and will not die. I see local punk bands all the time that are what it's all about. Perhaps the mainstream, overmarketed shit has left a sour taste in the mouths of the masses, but punk certainly continues by small bands in small clubs all over the world. Then again, when Green Day is considered punk...

Flashback
11-02-07, 11:05 AM
Seeing as this is close to the title

NEW YORK (CNN) -- Linda Stein, a former manager of the Ramones who later became known as "the Realtor for the stars," was found beaten to death in her posh Fifth Avenue apartment, police said Thursday. Star Realtor Linda Stein's client list included Madonna, Sting, Michael Douglas and Angelina Jolie. There was no indication of forced entry when police, responding to a 911 call, found Stein's body late Tuesday night, authorities said.

Stein was formerly married to Seymour Stein, ex-president of Sire Records, according to The Associated Press. It was the Sire label that released records that vaulted the Ramones, Talking Heads and Madonna to fame in the 1970s and '80s.

Stein, a former schoolteacher, co-managed the Ramones with Danny Fields during the band's heyday, AP reported. Many credit her with bringing the Ramones to England for a concert on July 4, 1976, that contributed to the popularity of the punk scene in the UK, according to AP.


CNN Link (http://www.cnn.com/2007/SHOWBIZ/11/01/stein.obit/?iref=mpstoryview)

nodeerforamonth
11-02-07, 11:22 AM
Punk's not dead.

Damn right! TONS of great punk bands out there. Dillinger Four, The Queers, Screeching Weasel, Lawrence Arms, Zeke, Candy Snatchers, etc... (and those are just the American modern day punk bands; I didn't even mention Australian & Swedish punk bands that are just as good). Like any form of music, sometimes you just have to go out and do more work to discover new bands.

People who listen to punk rock don't go to college.,...

College and college radio is where I found out and learned about punk!

(this belongs in Music Talk by the way)

nodeerforamonth
11-02-07, 11:26 AM
Shilling for the game is the seriously non-punk. Then again, punk is about thumbing your nose about society's expectations, so maybe it's punk after all.


What I found out weird about the Sex Pistols on Leno was they certainly went against my expectations! Before they took the stage, Congressman Ron Paul, who is running for President, was interviewed by Leno. He was saying how government is the problem, how less government is better, we need to get out of Iraq immediately... basically everything that you would think that Johnny Rotten and company would like to hear!

Then the Sex Pistols take the stage and sing "Anarchy For the UK". During the performance, Rotten goes something like "You hear that Ron Paul?!?!" and then turns his ass towards him and slaps it (as in "kiss my ass"). WTF?!?!? Something tells me Rotten's not as thought out about his politics as he's led people to believe. To Paul's credit, he did run up on stage w/ Leno after the performance and shook Rotten's hand.

nodeerforamonth
11-02-07, 11:32 AM
For what it's worth, Punk is not dead (IMO), and will not die. I see local punk bands all the time that are what it's all about. Perhaps the mainstream, overmarketed shit has left a sour taste in the mouths of the masses, but punk certainly continues by small bands in small clubs all over the world. Then again, when Green Day is considered punk...

Agreed... The funny thing about Green Day is that they were adored by the underground when their first two albums came out. Then when "Dookie" came out and made it big, the underground turned their backs on them, crying "Sell out!". Green Day responded by saying "We never waved the punk rock flag. We never said we were punk!"

Years later, they put out a great new album ("American Idiot") and are embraced by the kids once again. This time, they're accepted by the underground, and this time they're totally waving the "punk rock flag" and mentioning in all these interviews about "punk rock" and how "punk" they are. I guess when it goes in their favor, they're "punk" and when it doesn't, they're not.

inri222
11-02-07, 11:49 AM
The abbreviated history of Punk from the first page of this thread sickened me...no mention of Iggy and the Stooges? (no offense to the poster, I know you pasted from a source)

Also no mention of The Damned whose first album was released before The Sex Pistols'.

DaveNinja
11-02-07, 12:42 PM
Agreed... The funny thing about Green Day is that they were adored by the underground when their first two albums came out. Then when "Dookie" came out and made it big, the underground turned their backs on them, crying "Sell out!". Green Day responded by saying "We never waved the punk rock flag. We never said we were punk!"

Years later, they put out a great new album ("American Idiot") and are embraced by the kids once again. This time, they're accepted by the underground, and this time they're totally waving the "punk rock flag" and mentioning in all these interviews about "punk rock" and how "punk" they are. I guess when it goes in their favor, they're "punk" and when it doesn't, they're not.

I havent bought a green day album since Kerplunk nor seen them since they got too big for Gilman. sell outs

JasonF
11-02-07, 01:14 PM
The abbreviated history of Punk from the first page of this thread sickened me...no mention of Iggy and the Stooges? (no offense to the poster, I know you pasted from a source)

It does say abbreviated. IMO, you can't talk about the history of punk and proto-punk without mentioning Iggy, the MC5, and the New York Dolls. On the other hand, when you want to cover 40 years of punk in 8 lines, stuff necessarily gets left out.

I'm not sure what to think of whether punk is dead. I mean, punk was a specific reaction to what was going on in rock music at a specific time. It was an answer to rock that had become overly technical and overly technological, both in the form of progressive bands like Yes or King Crimson, and in the form of hard rock like Led Zeppelin or Black Sabbath. The idea behind punk was simple: forget the pretentious arrangements and the complicated guitar solos -- just get in, play the fucking song, and get out.

That message reverbated throughout music, and still reverbates to this day. Granted, punk doesn't still exist in the form the Ramones played it. But even by the time of End of the Century, the Ramones themselves weren't really doing that any more.

There are plenty of bands playing all sorts of rock music that have taken to heart the punk aesthetic of "take the thing down to the basics and keep it there." In that sense, punk is very much alive. The name "punk" came from the idea that this was music that any punk kid could play. You don't need to be Jimmy Page and you don't need to be Steve Howe. You just need to grab a guitar and play some music. And that spirit is still very much alive.

Supermallet
11-02-07, 01:18 PM
Punk moved to Japan, with bands like Melt Banana.

kakihara1
11-02-07, 01:22 PM
I never understood the fascination, adoration, and ultimate crowning of the Sex Pistols as the alpha and omega of Punk. In fact, I think they were fucking horrid, and the declaration that punk died when they broke up (I'm talking general consensus, not just in this thread) is absolutely absurd. The abbreviated history of Punk from the first page of this thread sickened me...no mention of Iggy and the Stooges? (no offense to the poster, I know you pasted from a source)

For what it's worth, Punk is not dead (IMO), and will not die. I see local punk bands all the time that are what it's all about. Perhaps the mainstream, overmarketed shit has left a sour taste in the mouths of the masses, but punk certainly continues by small bands in small clubs all over the world. Then again, when Green Day is considered punk...

I completely agree with this post.

BTW the Sex Pistols basically said from the start that it was all about the money and they basically wanted to "sell out" I'm not a Sex Pistols fan AT ALL.

There are places even in Ft. Wayne where you can still find cool punk shows, shit "The Murder Junkies" just played here a month ago.

wm lopez
11-02-07, 02:39 PM
Punk is not dead, it just sucks right now. And for the last decade or two.

And soul music and rock music.
The only thing that has gotten better since it's start is country music.

Numanoid
11-02-07, 04:59 PM
What I found out weird about the Sex Pistols on Leno was they certainly went against my expectations! Before they took the stage, Congressman Ron Paul, who is running for President, was interviewed by Leno. He was saying how government is the problem, how less government is better, we need to get out of Iraq immediately... basically everything that you would think that Johnny Rotten and company would like to hear!

Then the Sex Pistols take the stage and sing "Anarchy For the UK". During the performance, Rotten goes something like "You hear that Ron Paul?!?!" and then turns his ass towards him and slaps it (as in "kiss my ass"). WTF?!?!? Something tells me Rotten's not as thought out about his politics as he's led people to believe. To Paul's credit, he did run up on stage w/ Leno after the performance and shook Rotten's hand.Odds are that the Pistols and Paul were hanging out in the green room and chumming it up and Paul might have even said what a milestone it would be to get a shout-out from the Pistols or something. I wouldn't read much into it.

atlantamoi
11-02-07, 05:01 PM
I'm not a Sex Pistols fan AT ALL.
I'm sort of amazed that people who like punk rip on the Pistols. There's a horkin' big reason their debut gets so much praise and it's not all because of hype. I like pretty much all the punk albums from '77 (mainly Wire and The Saints), but to not like "Never Mind The Bollocks" is odd to me.

If we get to define punk in our terms then I'll say that the stuff started back in the 60's. Hell, even the 50's had wacked out thrashy tunes. But I tend to see it with a lot of 60's garage rock.

Ky-Fi
11-02-07, 05:47 PM
Yeah, I agree the term 'punk' doesn't stand up to a lot of scrutiny as far as a clear category. Some of the New York bands that were part of the early 'movement', like Blondie and Talking Heads, were never really punk. And even with the British bands, by 1979 John Lydon, The Clash, Siouxsie and the Banshees, the Slits and others were playing music that couldn't really be classified as punk, IMO. And for me personally, when those bands moved beyond punk, they REALLY got good---punk was a means to an end for them, not the end in itself.

darkflounder
11-02-07, 08:46 PM
Punk Rock is not dead.

It's just resting. It's just tired and shagged out after a prolonged mosh.

Amel
11-03-07, 05:45 PM
Part of the problem is that punk wasn't a certain style of music. It was a movement. When punk was punk, punk bands were spread over a pretty broad spectrum of musical sound. It had to do with things such as non-conformity, anti-establishment, and originality among other issues. Over time the musical style of such bands as The Ramones, Pistols, and Minor Threat have come to be most people's definition of what punk music should sound like. To me, punk and punk music are now (and for quite some time) separate entities. And I don't consider punk music to be dead. At least not until Fugazi is completely forgotten.

kms_md
11-03-07, 10:31 PM
this is not a fugazi thread ...

edited to add - damn amel i just want to jump in and throw in an offhand fugazi reference. my comment is more along the lines of the "this is not a fugazi t-shirt" lines than directed to your thread. i should have read your post completely prior to posting. :) (btw, smilies are not punk)

mikelowry
11-04-07, 02:40 AM
I don't think there is any "punk" band today that can resurrect the genre. Where have all those great bands gone?

lcnickell
11-04-07, 10:57 AM
i don't think punk ever died, or can die.

it's just the bands you listened to got old.

anyone who says punk died, 20-25+ years ago, are retarded.

GG ALLIN was the most PUNK thing ever, and he was going strong till '93.

zombeaner
11-04-07, 08:26 PM
Fugazi isn't a punk band anyway. The punk channel on Sirius plays them incessantly for some reason, Rollins Bands as well, also not a punk band. GG Allin was a douchebag. There are lots of bands and kids out there still going strong, new bands form everyday. Contrary to popular belief, they don't all sound like Blink 182 or Green Day (who I happen to like very much)

Matthew Chmiel
11-07-07, 12:27 AM
Is punk dead? I think this video answers that question:

wJk_kY2WY9E
Going to be completely honest, Ash's cover of that song is better than the Buzzcocks' original.

UAIOE
11-07-07, 03:36 AM
I always took "punk" as an attitude/actions more than an actual "sound".

I'd consider the guys from The Jams/KLF being "punk" simply because they did whatever the hell they wanted and a lot of their actions went against the established "norm".

But it's all open to interpretation.