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View Full Version : Cop sues brain-damaged toddler's family


cdollaz
10-11-07, 08:03 AM
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/5204925.html

Oct. 11, 2007, 12:38AM
Florida cop, hurt during drowning call, sues toddler's family


Associated Press

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CASSELBERRY, Fla. — A police officer who slipped and injured a knee responding to a toddler's near-drowning has sued the family of the 1-year-old boy, who suffered brain damage and can no longer walk, talk or swallow.

Casselberry Sgt. Andrea Eichhorn alleges Joey Cosmillo's family left a puddle of water on the floor, causing her fall during the rescue efforts. She broke her knee and missed two months of work.

The boy fell into the pool outside the family's home in suburban Orlando in January and now lives in a nursing home and eats and breathes through tubes.

"The loss we've suffered, and she's seeking money?" said Richard Cosmillo, 69, the boy's grandfather, who lived in the home with his wife and the boy's mother. "Of course there's going to be water in the house. He was sopping wet when we brought him in."

Eichhorn's attorney, David Heil, said she has persistent knee pain and will likely develop arthritis. He said city benefits paid by workers' compensation and some disability checks helped with medical bills, but it wasn't enough.

The lawsuit seeks unspecified damages.

<B>"It's a situation where the Cosmillos have caused these problems, brought them on themselves, then tried to play the victim," Heil said.</B>

Eichhorn's personnel file includes numerous commendations. The 12-year veteran has worked as a hostage negotiator and prostitution decoy and wrestled razors away from a suicidal person.

Police Chief John Pavlis said Eichhorn was a good officer, though he urged her not to sue.



Where do you come out on this one? The lawyers quote above is quite scummy. I would think there are certain dangers inherent in the job and her action should be against the city who maybe has inadequate coverage. She was on the job and they should be covering everything.

LiquidSky
10-11-07, 08:20 AM
I was thinking the same thing: in the line of duty. Wouldn't she be coverd by OJI?

AGuyNamedMike
10-11-07, 08:22 AM
The lawyers quote above is quite scummy.

Well, he is a litigation attorney. By definition, scummy.



...there are certain dangers inherent in the job and her action should be against the city who maybe has inadequate coverage. She was on the job and they should be covering everything.

Concur.

Here's a pic of sue-happy:

http://img248.imageshack.us/img248/2591/eichhorn20aab4.jpg

Gunde
10-11-07, 08:33 AM
Jesus Christ what a bitch!

starman9000
10-11-07, 08:41 AM
Wouldn't this set a pretty horrible precedent?

UncleGramps
10-11-07, 08:47 AM
Looks like she can rent out her enormous forehead as ad space to cover her medical bills.

Also, what a ridiculous suit. I would imagine injuries like that are a common risk in her line of work, and she should take more responsibility for ensuring her own safety.

cdollaz
10-11-07, 09:00 AM
Well, he is a litigation attorney. By definition, scummy.




Concur.

Here's a pic of sue-happy:

http://img248.imageshack.us/img248/2591/eichhorn20aab4.jpg

Wait, the article said she fell on her knee. It must have been a typo.

kenbuzz
10-11-07, 09:25 AM
Update:
http://www.cfnews13.com/News/Local/2007/10/10/officer_sue_family.html

The Casselberry Police Department does not support a lawsuit by one of its officers against the family of the boy she rescued.

Sergeant Andrea Eichhorn is suing the family of 1-year-old Joey Cosmillo. Cosmillo nearly drowned in the family's backyard pool, and Eichhorn was one of the officers called in to save her.

According to Eichhorn's suit, the family did not clean up the water from the pool. That caused her to slip and fall while rescuing Cosmillo. Eichhorn was off the job for two months after breaking her knee.

Cosmillo suffered brain damage, and now receives 24-hour nursing care. He also needs breathing and feeding tubes.

Casselberry's police chief, John Pavlis released a statement Wednesday, saying: "I do not support the lawsuit filed by Sgt. Eichhorn and her attorney... What happened to the Sergeant was an accident. She has been compensated for all time off the job due to this injury."

Also, you may want to click the "Officer Sues Family" video link on the above-linked page.

DVD Josh
10-11-07, 09:27 AM
Well, he is a litigation attorney. By definition, scummy.

You mean PERSONAL INJURY litigation attorney. Don't lump me in with this shithead.

kenbuzz
10-11-07, 09:30 AM
The Attorney: http://www.heil-law.com/
http://www.heil-law.com/pics/dave.jpg

His specialities:
• Auto Accidents
• Theme Park Accidents
• Slip & Fall
• Dog Bites
• Homeowners Cases
• Motorcycle Accidents
• Medical Malpractice
• Neck & Back Injuries
• Pool Accidents
• Defective Products
• Legal Advice
• Insurance Policy Disputes
• Boating Accidents
• Pedestrian Accidents
• Brain Injuries
• Workers Compensation
• Pharmacy Negligence
• Burn Cases
• Nursing Home Neglect
• Sexual Harrasement

Giles
10-11-07, 09:35 AM
Looks like she can rent out her enormous forehead as ad space to cover her medical bills.

Also, what a ridiculous suit. I would imagine injuries like that are a common risk in her line of work, and she should take more responsibility for ensuring her own safety.

you'd think, but alas she doesn't seem that bright.

JasonF
10-11-07, 09:38 AM
Sergeant Andrea Eichhorn is suing the family of 1-year-old Joey Cosmillo. Cosmillo nearly drowned in the family's backyard pool, and Eichhorn was one of the officers called in to save her.

According to Eichhorn's suit, the family did not clean up the water from the pool. That caused her to slip and fall while rescuing Cosmillo. Eichhorn was off the job for two months after breaking her knee.

"Oh my god! Joey's drowning! Quick, you call 911 and I'll grab a mop!"

AGuyNamedMike
10-11-07, 09:40 AM
You mean PERSONAL INJURY litigation attorney. Don't lump me in with this shithead.

Sorry, noted.

Tracer Bullet
10-11-07, 09:46 AM
Absolutely ridiculous. It should be immediately thrown out of court.

Mrs. Danger
10-11-07, 10:55 AM
If she had slipped on a banana peel, or something besides water, maybe. But in a drowning case, you should be expecting water.

I hope the judge throws the case out with extreme prejudice.

TheNightFlier
10-11-07, 11:06 AM
Wow, hope this gets tossed immediately.

bunkaroo
10-11-07, 11:08 AM
I don't see why the police force or the city aren't covering this medical expense.

Now, if she's going broke because of medical bills related to this, I could see trying to get some money from the defendant's homeowner's insurance, but I surely hope she's not going after their personal property or assets.

grrrah
10-11-07, 11:13 AM
Can the family sue her for not saving their toddler from severe brain injuries?

cdollaz
10-11-07, 11:20 AM
I don't see why the police force or the city aren't covering this medical expense.


At least in private industry, that is the main reason they pay for worker's compensation. Although they have strict liability and their worker's comp must cover the employee under most situations (this one would definitely apply), it also releases the employer of any other duty to compensate and they can't be sued by the employee. Not sure if it is the same for govt. agency employers.

Her best action may be against the insurer. That stuff probably varies from state to-state. I think in some states, worker's comp is offered by private insurance companies and in others, by the state.

nateman
10-11-07, 11:26 AM
Can the family sue her for not saving their toddler from severe brain injuries?
You make a good case.

she has persistent knee pain and will likely develop arthritis.
Oh yeah, poor woman is going to have arthritis & that toddler only has brain damage. Basically she’s suing because she’ll probably have arthritis when she gets older; & I thought that guy who sued god was crazy! He’s sane compared to this Looney bin.

Jadzia
10-11-07, 12:14 PM
That's just wrong. So if someone got shot, would she sue if she slipped in their blood puddle? I don't think mopping is a priority in a life or death situation.

If the police force is not covering her medical bills, she should sue them, not the victim's family.

Bandoman
10-11-07, 01:21 PM
If she had slipped on a banana peel, or something besides water, maybe. But in a drowning case, you should be expecting water.

I hope the judge throws the case out with extreme prejudice.

You mean you hope they kill her? :eek:

Bandoman
10-11-07, 01:23 PM
And to address the case for a second, it is complete horseshit. To prove negligence, she would have to prove that the family did not act the way a reasonably prudent person would act under the circumstances. The last phrase is key. In a life-and-death emergency like that, NO ONE would be expected to worry about cleaning up the water dripping off their drowning child DURING RESCUE EFFORTS.

Heat
10-11-07, 01:47 PM
For what it's worth, I’m sure her plan was to get a settlement from the homeowner’s insurance policy, not to actually take the parents to court.

islandclaws
10-11-07, 01:48 PM
In a situation like this I honestly wonder just what the hell this woman is thinking. Does she really need money that bad that she's willing to sink to scumbag levels to get it? It's like people can't wait for something like this to happen to them so they can sue, since it seems to be the national pastime.

devilshalo
10-11-07, 01:59 PM
I was a jury foreman for a similar case. Like the officer, this home care nurse sued (not the family, but the owners of the apartment complex) for negligence. While visiting a patient, she happened to slip in some standing water on the property that had started to grow moss. The slip caused her back pain. Her employers had already paid WC and offered rehab, but she refused rehab and was seeking to be found permanently disabled. Unfortunately, for the property owner, their lawyer failed to deny the wet, mossy puddle, so there was shared negligence found on their part. The hard part was that I did not want to award any P&S money to someone that refused rehab. Other jurors didn't see it that way.

Since it was a civil case, it became a haggle in the jury room to arrive at a number that everyone was satisfied with. It reminded me of the old comedy bits of negotiating where both sides spouting numbers until one side fucks up and goes lower than they wanted.

shoppingbear
10-11-07, 02:05 PM
At least in private industry, that is the main reason they pay for worker's compensation. Although they have strict liability and their worker's comp must cover the employee under most situations (this one would definitely apply), it also releases the employer of any other duty to compensate and they can't be sued by the employee. Not sure if it is the same for govt. agency employers.

Her best action may be against the insurer. That stuff probably varies from state to-state. I think in some states, worker's comp is offered by private insurance companies and in others, by the state.
I would be VERY surprised if she was allowed to sue her employer (the police dept or local government). When I worked for a police dept, the contract between the police officers and dept was VERY, VERY detailed down to the nth degree, and from the dept's point of view, their first priority would be protecting themselves from being bankrupt by lawsuits, so they probably spell that out in the contract (that you can't sue them).

This is probably an issue where she either can't sue her insurer (again, possibly written into the policy or job agreement) or something similar. I would think she would have a claim against the homeowner's insurance, but nothing more.

I agree, the lawsuit as it's reported is absolutely ridiculous.

movieguru
10-11-07, 02:43 PM
And to address the case for a second, it is complete horseshit. To prove negligence, she would have to prove that the family did not act the way a reasonably prudent person would act under the circumstances. The last phrase is key. In a life-and-death emergency like that, NO ONE would be expected to worry about cleaning up the water dripping off their drowning child DURING RESCUE EFFORTS.

They were obviously negligent in taking care of the toddler since he nearly drowned in a pool. Her employer should be the first one to cover her injuries, but since they haven't, I see no problem with her suing the homeowners of the negligent parents.

cdollaz
10-11-07, 02:47 PM
They were obviously negligent in taking care of the toddler since he nearly drowned in a pool. Her employer should be the first one to cover her injuries, but since they haven't, I see no problem with her suing the homeowners of the negligent parents.

We have zero info as to how the child ended up in the pool, so you can't say they are obviously negligent.

Bandoman
10-11-07, 03:10 PM
They were obviously negligent in taking care of the toddler since he nearly drowned in a pool. Her employer should be the first one to cover her injuries, but since they haven't, I see no problem with her suing the homeowners of the negligent parents.

So the theory of liability would be that the victims' parents were negligent for allowing the emergency which necessitated calling the police/rescue personnel? I don't think that would fly - the emergency call itself isn't what injured the officer (it's her job to respond to emergencies), it was the water on the floor, the presence of which is not evidence of negligence under the circumstances, IMO.

cdollaz
10-11-07, 03:16 PM
So the theory of liability would be that the victims' parents were negligent for allowing the emergency which necessitated calling the police/rescue personnel? I don't think that would fly - the emergency call itself isn't what injured the officer (it's her job to respond to emergencies), it was the water on the floor, the presence of which is not evidence of negligence under the circumstances, IMO.

Exactly. She has a duty to respond regardless of the circumstances.

slappypete
10-11-07, 03:42 PM
They were obviously negligent in taking care of the toddler since he nearly drowned in a pool. Her employer should be the first one to cover her injuries, but since they haven't, I see no problem with her suing the homeowners of the negligent parents.

If a women is being beaten by her husband and calls the police, should she be responsible for injuries to the cops if the husband attacks them when they arrive? She was obviously negligent in choosing her husband.

Jadzia
10-11-07, 03:57 PM
So if this woman got hurt responding on a call during Katrina, who would she sue, God?

Bandoman
10-11-07, 04:03 PM
So if this woman got hurt responding on a call during Katrina, who would she sue, God?

Under movieguru's theory, she could sue the City of New Orleans and the federal gov't for failure to prevent the flood waters from breaching the levees.

pinata242
10-11-07, 04:05 PM
Under movieguru's theory, she could sue the City of New Orleans and the federal gov't for failure to prevent the flood waters from breaching the levees.
And each and every person that didn't evacuate before the hurricane hit and therefore causing the emergency situation. It was negligent to remain in harm's way...

JasonF
10-11-07, 04:57 PM
Plaintiff should lose this case under Palsgraf (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palsgraf_v._Long_Island_Railroad_Co.), which Plaintiffs' counsel almost certainly studied the first week (if not the first day) of law school.

movieguru
10-11-07, 05:05 PM
Plaintiff should lose this case under Palsgraf (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palsgraf_v._Long_Island_Railroad_Co.), which Plaintiffs' counsel almost certainly studied the first week (if not the first day) of law school.

In this case the decision was reversed because the employee could not reasonable forsee the danger from the package.. I'm not understanding how this applies to the other case. The homeowners should be able to reasonbly forsee the inheriet danger that a wet slippery floor would create.

wildcatlh
10-11-07, 05:51 PM
She dropped the lawsuit. I'd bet she was surprised by the national reaction (though I don't know how she could've been, in this day and age)

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/orl-bk-copsuit101107,0,7500694.story

Officer says she will drop suit against family in near drowning

Rene Stutzman

Sentinel Staff Writer

5:11 PM EDT, October 11, 2007

CASSELBERRY

A police sergeant who sued a family with a baby who suffered severe brain damage from a near drowning because the officer slipped and fell in a puddle of water at the house will drop the lawsuit, her attorney said late this afternoon.

Attorney David Heil, who represents Casselberry Police Sgt. Andrea Eichhorn, said he plans to file paperwork to that effect as early as Friday.

The city also reported today that it has placed Eichhorn on leave.

The police department would not explain why she was removed from duty. In a prepared statement, the department said it did so after a controversy over the suit caused it to review the incident.

Eichhorn sued the mother and grandparents of Joey Cosmillo, 22 months, on Oct. 1, alleging negligence. The suit says she slipped and fell in water that was left on the floor because the boy had been brought inside.

Eichhorn broke her kneecap and missed two months of work because of the Jan. 9 incident. Her medical bills and pay during that time were covered by the city or its insurance carrier.

Eichhorn's attorney David Heil was not immediately available for comment.

A check of the court file at noon indicated the status of the suit had not changed.

City Manager Barbara Lipscomb, in a prepared statement, said she wanted to encourage Casselberry residents to continue to call 911 when there is an emergency.

Jadzia
10-11-07, 05:59 PM
City Manager Barbara Lipscomb, in a prepared statement, said she wanted to encourage Casselberry residents to continue to call 911 when there is an emergency.


:lol:

Just clean your house first.

fujishig
10-11-07, 06:04 PM
I wonder what public opinion would've been if she had heroically saved the toddler and suffered this injury. Ah, probably about the same.

movieking
10-12-07, 05:18 PM
Pure scum. Trying to cash in, regardless of the harm it would further cause the toddler's family. I hope that she gets disciplined or fired. I wouldn't want her to show up at my house on a call.

Jericho
10-12-07, 05:35 PM
While I agree that the lawsuit is unlikely to win and probably doesn't have great merits (if any), I can at least understand the suit. If she got injured and had some permanent injuries and such that Worker's Comp didn't/wouldn't cover, I can see the suit. Now whether there is such an injury and whether there really was liability on the homeowner's part is another story, and a likely losing one for the cop.

Sorraffy
10-12-07, 06:47 PM
haha that's funny

look at those those stupid people who even wrote the article

"has sued the family of the 1-year-old boy, who suffered brain damage and can no longer walk, talk or swallow"

they make the point of saying this kid "can no longer walk, talk, or swallow"

my question is .... why is the kid still alive is his life is going to be this kind of hell?

dear sympathy giving article, this isn't the first time nor will be the last time it happens. Move on to better news

Justin Kicks As
10-12-07, 09:45 PM
people like her are why my insurance rates are crazy high. I should sue her, help me think of something i can sue her for.

reading this article has given me (left me with?) mental anguish, in the amount of $744,211. I'm filing papers now.

matta
10-12-07, 09:53 PM
They interviewed her on the radio this morning, it seems like the newsagencies are missing the point...

Her case was that the family did not have a fence around their pool, which is illegal in Florida. They were previously cited many times and did not build a fence. So, when the kid fell in, the family was being negligent. The negligence of the family started the chain of events that led to her injury.

I'm not saying it's right, just that it wasn't as horrible as the media wants to make it seem.

DVD Polizei
10-12-07, 11:36 PM
This is Florida. Duh.

kenbuzz
10-13-07, 01:34 AM
I don't see why the police force or the city aren't covering this medical expense.They did...
Linky: http://www.cfnews13.com/uploadedFiles/Stories/Local/Eichhorn%20Suit%20PR.doc

The Casselberry Police Department has received many calls, e-mails and public comments on an October 10, 2007 Orlando Sentinel story regarding a departmental Sergeant filing a law suit on a local resident for injuries she received handling a call for service. Members of the Police Department responded to a call of a young child drowning at 1190 Lancelot Way on January 9, 2007. Sgt. Andrea Eichhorn, the Detective Unit Supervisor, was one of several officers and EMS staff members that responded to the call. Sgt. Eichhorn slipped on wet flooring during the course of the call and fractured her knee. Eichhorn asked for and received medical screening and care appropriate for her injury. The injury resulted in Sgt. Eichhorn being off work for approximately two months. She returned to work in a light duty capacity for approximately a month thereafter. Eichhorn received full medical benefits, worker’s compensation care, her salary and accumulated sick and vacation time during her absence. Eichhorn was ultimately released for full duty although she still complains of some residual effects from her injury.

kenbuzz
10-13-07, 01:36 AM
They interviewed her on the radio this morning, it seems like the newsagencies are missing the point...

Her case was that the family did not have a fence around their pool, which is illegal in Florida. They were previously cited many times and did not build a fence. So, when the kid fell in, the family was being negligent. The negligence of the family started the chain of events that led to her injury.

I'm not saying it's right, just that it wasn't as horrible as the media wants to make it seem.I've read the police report, you can too...
http://www.cfnews13.com//uploadedFiles/Stories/Local/Officer%20Sues%20Family%20Report.pdf

There are allegations of negligence... you betcha. But a private suit isn't the way to go. Cite, cite, and cite again, and get Childrens Protective Services involved if necessary.

creekdipper
10-15-07, 06:18 AM
They were obviously negligent in taking care of the toddler since he nearly drowned in a pool. Her employer should be the first one to cover her injuries, but since they haven't, I see no problem with her suing the homeowners of the negligent parents.

From some of the later reports (no fence around a pool), it does sound as if the family were very negligent regarding pool safety & the hazard that was waiting.

However, one shouldn't assume that parents are negligent simply because accidents happen. We know a very careful couple whose child drowned in their pool during another child's birthday party because one of their older children had unlocked the gate & left it open. The younger child wandered into the pool area unnoticed while everyone else was celebrating in another part of the house (the person who was supposed to be watching the child was negligent, however). Parents can take all kinds of precautions to prevent accidents (baby gates, locking up hazardous cleaning fluids, etc.), but all it takes is one careless moment on the part of another, older child whose negligence is due to immaturity to have a disaster happen.

When I was still in the crib, my older brother got hold of some air freshener & sprayed me in the face...fortunately, I wasn't blinded. He was old enough to know better, and I never blamed my parents for it...just like he doesn't blame me for conking him over the head with a baseball bat or roping him & breaking his leg.

Despite parent's best efforts, accidents DO happen (that's how they get their name). To make your property completely safe, why not build barriers around all the trees (better yet, cut them down) to prevent a child from climbing it & possibly falling? I'm just saying that life does come with risks and each person has to gauge the potential hazards to see if they're worth it (one reason I wouldn't have a pool). I just think it's presumptive to automatically label parents of children who are injured around the house (such as the child who darts behind the car at the last moment when the parent is backing out of the driveway...after carefully checking to make sure the path is clear, etc.) as being 'negligent'.

fujishig
10-15-07, 02:14 PM
I think it's easier to just put your child in a bubble... of course, it'll have to be one that can float on water without taking any in. Can't wait for that law to be enacted.

johnglass
12-05-07, 03:42 PM
Justice is served.

Casselberry officer fired after suing injured boy's family (http://link)

Two months ago, after hundreds of people from across the country voiced their outrage, Casselberry police Sgt. Andrea Eichhorn dropped her lawsuit against the family of tiny, brain-damaged Joey Cosmillo.

It wasn't enough to save her job.

On Tuesday, the Casselberry Police Department fired her.

Her suit, filed Oct. 1 and abandoned Oct. 12, brought public ridicule to the agency, according to a memo from police Chief John Pavlis. It damaged the city's image and made people question whether they, too, might get sued by officers responding to 911 calls.

Eichhorn got what she deserved, said Richard Cosmillo, the boy's grandfather and guardian.

If she hadn't filed suit, he said Tuesday evening, "she wouldn't have been fired, would she?"

Police spokesman Lt. Dennis Stewart would not comment.

Eichhorn, 36, of Chuluota, a 12-year department veteran, was not available for comment.

Joey Cosmillo fell into his backyard pool Jan. 9. When his mother found the 1-year-old a few minutes later, he was unconscious and not breathing. She hauled him out, carried him inside and called 911. She told the 911 operator she thought her son was dead.

Eichhorn was the third rescuer at the house. She slipped and fell in a puddle of water in the hallway, near where officers were performing CPR.

She didn't see the water, she told police Lt. Ralph Mellon, who conducted an internal police investigation into the matter. She only realized the floor was wet, she told him, because when she fell and wound up on the seat of her pants, they got wet.

Later that day, she had a co-worker drive her to an emergency outpatient clinic. Doctors concluded she had broken a kneecap.

The city or its insurer covered all her medical bills, and although she missed two months of work, she didn't lose a single day's pay, according to the internal investigation.

Eichhorn sued because she was afraid she might wind up disabled, the city's insurer might reject her claims or that she would become a burden to her family, she told the department.

She and her attorney, David Heil, had tried for months to get money from the Cosmillos, but the family had ignored her claim, so on Oct. 1 she filed suit in state circuit court in Sanford, accusing the family of negligence.

The Orlando Sentinel published an article Oct. 10, and the outcry was immediate. The police department and city offices were inundated during the next several days with calls and e-mail from people outraged by the suit.

Judi Romboli, executive assistant to Casselberry's city manager, told Mellon that in her 14 years on the job, she had never had to deal with anything like it.

"No, nothing. This was the worst," she said.

Eichhorn was in tears and went home sick the day the article appeared, according to the investigative report. She stayed home the next day.

That same day, Pavlis placed her on a paid leave of absence and called for the internal investigation. Mellon completed it three weeks ago, concluding Eichhorn had violated several department policies, including damaging the department's image and filing suit without giving the police chief advance written notice.

On Nov. 19, Pavlis took away her badge and weapon, telling her he intended to fire her. She asked for a review and got it, but it did no good. On Tuesday, Pavlis fired her.

Eichhorn has 10 days to appeal.

Joey Cosmillo, now 2, suffered severe brain damage that day in the pool. He now lives in a home for profoundly handicapped children, unable to breathe or swallow on his own. His grandfather is hoping for a miracle.

"I don't want my Joey to live the way he's living for the rest of his life," he said. "I need my Joey to live and breathe the way other kids do."

cdollaz
12-05-07, 03:53 PM
Now comes wrongful termination suit.

dieinafire
12-05-07, 03:58 PM
Now comes wrongful termination suit.

She better not, she has no grounds. She got exactly what she deserved. Just a money grubbing ****. I hope she gets arthritis in her knee, and can't walk right ever again.

Giles
12-05-07, 03:58 PM
Eichhorn has 10 days to appeal.




I betcha she'll appeal - the selfish bitch.

DVD Josh
12-05-07, 04:10 PM
Now comes wrongful termination suit.

She was fired for cause:

"According to a memo from police Chief John Pavlis. It damaged the city's image and made people question whether they, too, might get sued by officers responding to 911 calls"

That's pretty legitimate to me.

Bandoman
12-05-07, 04:17 PM
I kind of feel bad for her. She needed to learn a lesson, but lose her job? She was obviously swayed by some unscrupulous lawyer.

cdollaz
12-05-07, 04:35 PM
She was fired for cause:

"According to a memo from police Chief John Pavlis. It damaged the city's image and made people question whether they, too, might get sued by officers responding to 911 calls"

That's pretty legitimate to me.

Doesn't mean she can't sue.

Cool Kitten
12-05-07, 04:44 PM
I kind of feel bad for her. She needed to learn a lesson, but lose her job? She was obviously swayed by some unscrupulous lawyer.
sure, blame someone else for "forcing" you to sue the family of a brain-damaged baby :lol:

Bandoman
12-05-07, 04:49 PM
sure, blame someone else for "forcing" you to sue the family of a brain-damaged baby :lol:

STFU and go make Bushdog a sandwich.

Cool Kitten
12-05-07, 04:50 PM
STFU and go make Bushdog a sandwich.
shut up you money-grabbing lawyer.

Bandoman
12-05-07, 04:51 PM
shut up you money-grabbing lawyer.

Pill waitress.

DVD Josh
12-05-07, 04:56 PM
Doesn't mean she can't sue.

Well you are right about that, she certainly loves to sue. If the person firing her was a brain damaged baby, then it's a guarantee.

DeltaSigChi4
12-05-07, 05:01 PM
The true villains in this case are not the police officer and her attorney, but the grandparents who after being cited and cited and cited [and cited some more] over their pool, refused to comply with the law, and caused the brain damage of their grandchild.

They killed a child, she sued over her broken knee, and somehow she is the ultra heel here. Give me a break.

E

Seantn
12-05-07, 05:07 PM
Where does it say they were cited about their pool? I honestly didn't see it anywhere, but might've just skipped over it.

The Valeyard
12-05-07, 07:53 PM
The true villains in this case are not the police officer and her attorney, but the grandparents who after being cited and cited and cited [and cited some more] over their pool, refused to comply with the law, and caused the brain damage of their grandchild.

They killed a child, she sued over her broken knee, and somehow she is the ultra heel here. Give me a break.

E


What the hell are you talking about?

Bacon
12-05-07, 08:02 PM
To serve, protect, disable and sue

money hungry bitch

wewantflair
12-05-07, 10:35 PM
Nothing like a group of guys continuously referring to a female as a "bitch" and a "****."

shaun3000
12-06-07, 12:10 AM
Nothing like a group of guys continuously referring to a female as a "bitch" and a "****."
It's well-deserved in this situation.

shaun3000
12-06-07, 12:11 AM
The true villains in this case are not the police officer and her attorney, but the grandparents who after being cited and cited and cited [and cited some more] over their pool, refused to comply with the law, and caused the brain damage of their grandchild.

They killed a child, she sued over her broken knee, and somehow she is the ultra heel here. Give me a break.

E
I think you forgot one of these: ;)

NotThatGuy
12-06-07, 12:48 AM
Isn't that cute, the ambulance chaser and drug dealer are fighting...I wonder who will shank who first?!!

-p

Bandoman
12-06-07, 06:57 AM
Isn't that cute, the ambulance chaser and drug dealer are fighting...I wonder who will shank who first?!!

-p

CK would kick my ass. I give up.

Ocelot
12-06-07, 01:02 PM
wow... coming from a police officer, it's just WOW...

i agree with creekdipper, accidents are accidents, even though you can keep on pointing fingers, the bottom line is, her fall is an accident (actually, it's pretty stupid one if you ask me, lucky that her gun didn't go off).

anyhow, i'm glad to hear she got fired over this, she saw this coming anyway...

Toad
12-06-07, 01:16 PM
I don't think she's a bitch. If you got injured, you'd sue too. Of course, people will think your LAWYER is scummy instead of YOU, but what can you do.

She suffered personal injury, and she should be able to recover. She's likely going after insurance, not the homeowners' personal funds.

Agree that there's not nearly enough info re: negligence; it depends on a multitude of factors (e.g., how long was the water there, etc.), none of which we'll ever know about unless we read the pleadings.

Toad
12-06-07, 01:20 PM
:lol: The venom in this thread is pathetic.

johnglass
12-06-07, 01:54 PM
I don't think she's a bitch. If you got injured, you'd sue too. Of course, people will think your LAWYER is scummy instead of YOU, but what can you do.


"It's a situation where the Cosmillos have caused these problems, brought them on themselves, then tried to play the victim," Heil said.

Yeah, the lawyer is a real model citizen.

Meglos
12-06-07, 02:12 PM
I await the inevitable David E Kelley-written Boston Legal episode based on this incident.