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View Full Version : Hi, I'm deaf. Let's be friends, I love you. Give me money.


Brent L
05-08-07, 03:36 PM
Alrighty, so I went to lunch with my mom and dad today at Athens, a Greek restaurant. While it's not the most fancy place in the world, it's certainly not fast food, and it's higher up on the chain than places like Applebee's. It's a place with lower lighting, candles, and a typical spot here in town where people from businesses go to for a quiet and peaceful lunch.

Anyway, while we were eating I noticed a strange guy walking around in a baseball cap. I didn't think much of it and just ignored him. A few minutes later, the guy finally makes his way to our table, doesn't say a single word, and simply tosses the following down on our table:

http://img114.imageshack.us/img114/7352/1000295jb7.jpg

Now I didn't see what it was to start with. It landed in front of my dad, so he was looking at it. About 30 seconds or a minute went by, and the odd thing was that the guy was still standing at our table. We tried to just ignore him, but he simply wasn't going to go away. My dad finally gave him a buck, and then he went on his way. I still didn't know what it was, so I finally grabbed it to take a look, and I instantly started laughing about the entire situation. Maybe that was rude of me, I'm not sure if the guy saw me or not, but I just couldn't help myself. Here was this guy, walking around and placing one of those little cards on each and every table, refusing to walk away on his own until people finally broke down and gave him money.

Have you guys ever seen anything like this? I can see it on any random street, but a guy walking around in a somewhat fancy restaurant?

My first thought was that it was totally a grifter, just playing on everyone's emotions in order to get some sympathy cash out of the people eating in this place. Then a part of me felt sorry for the guy, thinking that if he is deaf that's pretty sad. Then my sense once again took hold, and I decided that even if the guy was deaf, he's still a sort of grifter. Can't deaf people get work as well? I mean, it's not like the guy was blind, and there's any number of things that he could do for a living instead giving away little cards with a pin stuck on it in hopes of receive "donations".

Deaf or not, I found the entire thing totally rude, and pretty funny since it was just so unusual. I'm a sympathetic guy, but come on. No matter if the guy really was deaf or not, there's still no excuse for this. What would you guys do in a situation like that?

NORML54601
05-08-07, 03:39 PM
I'd do something like this, just like I am now:

rotfl

das Monkey
05-08-07, 03:40 PM
Alrighty, so I went to lunch with my mom and dad today at Athen's, a Greek restaurant.
Is Athen the head chef at that location, or is it one of those deals where there are a bunch of Athen's restaurants all over the place, and Athen himself never shows his face?

das

Bandoman
05-08-07, 03:40 PM
Your dad should have pretended to be blind.

Cychosis
05-08-07, 03:42 PM
I've seen this a number of times, always in a restaurant. I just shake my head and hand the thing back to him.

Jay

The Edit King
05-08-07, 03:42 PM
Deaf or not, I found the entire thing totally rude, and pretty funny since it was just so unusual. I'm a sympathetic guy, but come on. No matter if the guy really was deaf or not, there's still no excuse for this. What would you guys do in a situation like that?I kinda feel the same way, however...

That happens sometimes when Treesa and I grab a bite at a Mall or whatnot, and we might smile at the guy (or gal), but we just leave it there and continue eating, and the guy (or gal) will come back, pick it up and be on his (or her) way.

-Paul

Dr. Henry Jones, Jr.
05-08-07, 03:42 PM
People do that on the trains here. It is illegal and I once flagged down a police officer to get rid of the guy. I think he got arrested.

Brent L
05-08-07, 03:42 PM
Is Athen the head chef at that location, or is it one of those deals where there are a bunch of Athen's restaurants all over the place, and Athen himself never shows his face?

das

Touche. :p

Bandoman
05-08-07, 03:44 PM
Douche. :p
Fixed.

;)

El Scorcho
05-08-07, 03:45 PM
I have a whole stack of those cards, only instead of 'deaf' it says 'short'.

Brent L
05-08-07, 03:46 PM
I just told a friend of mine about this and she said that she saw the same guy in the local Target yesterday.

:lol:

matome
05-08-07, 03:47 PM
Your dad should have pretended to be blind.

:lol:

Ranger
05-08-07, 03:47 PM
Yeah, there was another thread on this. I had it happen once in a store parking lot a few years ago. Dunno how these things can be common. Could there actually be a legit charity organization pushing stuff like this? I doubt it.

McHawkson
05-08-07, 03:49 PM
One time, I had breakfast with a deaf friend from Arizona, the waiter came to us and offered $1 for alphabet card. :whofart: I told him that if I have the alphabet card, I would give it to him for free.

I would recommend NOT donate to anything like that, it's fucking stupid.

Charlie Goose
05-08-07, 03:59 PM
That happened to me once at a restaurant, while eating lunch in the outdoor cafe. The guy put it on the table, and I brushed it off to the ground without even looking at it. Then I gave him the maloika stare. He picked it up and walked away. Fuck him.

MBoyd
05-08-07, 03:59 PM
I have seen this a couple of times too. Not since I was younger though. It was when we were on vacation. Never saw it happen in Texas and quite frankly forgot all about it until now.

Altimus Prime
05-08-07, 04:04 PM
Yeah, I came across this kind of thing once before. Can't recall where. He was trying to sell pens. I didn't buy one.

On further thought, it was probably in a restaurant, a fast food one. I can't believe that a more formal place that has more control over who's inside would allow this. It could really annoy patrons who aren't expecting to be hit up for a "donation."

The Edit King
05-08-07, 04:06 PM
Could there actually be a legit charity organization pushing stuff like this? I doubt it.One time, I had breakfast with a deaf friend from Arizona, the waiter came to us and offered $1 for alphabet card.
http://www.deafscribe.com/lj/iamhearing.jpg

Here's the Link (http://www.i711.com/my711.php?tab=2&article=78).

"You've probably seen them. They lurk in malls, airports, parks and busy city streets, holding a stack of small white leaflets. The leaflets usually show the ASL alphabet together with a plea for money. You've spotted that rare but distinctive creature - the Deaf Peddler.

The last time deaf peddlers were in the news in a big way, it was because a Mexican gang had forced a group of deaf people to work for them in 1997 as peddlers. The New York Times did a story on it, and it became national news.

But there have been, and continue to be, deaf peddlers who do it themselves for their own reasons. One even wrote a book about it: Deaf Peddler: Confessions of an Inside Man. The book is the story of a deaf man with a graduate degree in computer science who made money as a peddler for 11 years.

Deaf peddlers have long been seen with fear, loathing and resentment by most in the deaf and hard of hearing community. Fear that hearing people will see all other deaf people as peddlers; loathing of the way deaf peddlers manipulate the kindness of others for personal gain; and resentment towards able-bodied deaf peddlers who appear perfectly capable of working.

Despite the stigma associated with seeking handouts, deaf peddlers continue to pop up for a simple reason - it pays. It's not unusual for a deaf peddler to make a good deal more than someone working a minimum wage job. Deaf peddlers often defend the practice a form of self employment. Critics call it a scam. Plenty of people can say they know a scam when they see one, but what's the key difference between honest work and a scam?

In a word - value.

Honest work is an exchange of value. One person has a product, a service, special ability, knowledge, or simply the time and energy to do useful work. All of these things have value, and they are traded for something else of value - usually money.

There are many types of scams, but they all share one thing in common - they take something of value and give little or nothing in return.

The deaf peddler usually pretends to offer value by distributing a leaflet printed with a manual alphabet, or some other cheap trinket. Is it valuable? It might be, for some. The pretense continues by asking people to donate what they wish, rather than asking for a set price. This allows anyone to decide for themselves the value of the leaflet or trinket.

But it doesn't stop there. The deaf peddler always includes something else - a declaration of identity. "I am deaf".

If the leaflet has real value, why is it necessary to say this? If the deaf peddler does not identify himself as deaf, would he collect as much money? Probably not. Hearing peddlers who pretend to be deaf clearly understand this.

There is only one reason to claim deaf identity when distributing these leaflets - to make more money by provoking the sympathies and generosity of gullible people. This tips the balance away from value toward manipulation - a scam.

And here we arrive at the heart of why deaf peddlers get no respect. They abuse and prostitute their own identity rather than offer something of real value, and damage public perception of all deaf people as they do it.

Gaining value demands time and energy. This can come through education, experience, practice and consistent focus. It's not easy. Most people earn a living working for someone else, renting out their knowledge and ability by the hour. Others hire people to work for them according to the market value of their skills. Either way, it's an exchange of value.

It is in the deaf community's interest to keep our value as high as possible. Easy money will always be tempting for some, but it comes with its own price tag in the form of self-respect. The deaf community understands this - and chooses value."
_____________

-Paul

Brent L
05-08-07, 04:09 PM
Wow.

Just...wow.

What made the card the guy I saw so funny was not only did it say that he's deaf and this was how he's making money, but it included "let's be friends" and "I love you" on the card as well. Just so over the top, it's ridiculous.

adamblast
05-08-07, 04:09 PM
What's the charity that has those dumb little white canes (representing the blind) that they pin to people's lapels and then try to charge for? Lions? Moose lodge?

If there's anything I hate it's the "Easter Seals" or "curb painting" kind of campaign-- giving you something whether you want it or not and then trying to make you pay a donation afterwards. Never fails to get my goat.

grem458
05-08-07, 04:10 PM
Very bizarre. I've never heard of such a thing. Don't you have No Solicitation laws where you are?

McHawkson
05-08-07, 04:14 PM
The leaflets usually show the ASL alphabet together with a plea for money.

-ohbfrank- The article shouldn't specific ASL, the sign language alphabet is same with all three American sign languages (ASL, SEE, PSE).

Rockmjd23
05-08-07, 04:20 PM
Very bizarre. I've never heard of such a thing. Don't you have No Solicitation laws where you are?
Same here. I think the owners would just tell them to get the hell out around here.

kenbuzz
05-08-07, 04:42 PM
I tend to disagree about 'SEE' being a language. It's English words and English grammar using English word order - only using your hands to "voice" them. If it's a language, then it's already got a name -- English. I feel similarly about 'PSE'. ASL is undoubtedly a language, no argument there. The "Sign Language Alphabet" was designed by Gallaudet, based on French SL, and is without a doubt the "ASL" alphabet. 'SEE' and 'PSE' are signing styles that use that alphabet. I have no issues with it being referred to as the "ASL" alphabet.

I had a deaf girlfriend, dated an interpreter for a long time, was marginally active in the deaf community, was a member of an ASL "singing" group, interpreted church services, taught ASL at the local Air Force Base, and was just a couple of field hours away from completing my Manual Communication degree before I moved from Ohio. I'm not deaf and can't speak for their community, but I think you can trust me on this one - the deaf pretty much univerally look down upon panhandlers peddling these ASL cards. Do not give them money.

One time I was approached at LAX. I looked at the card, looked at the panhandler, and started asking him (in ASL, of course) if he was really deaf and what kind of reaction he would expect to get if he were to hand the card to a deaf man who was a LOT bigger than him. I think he got the message - he apologized and took off running.

McHawkson
05-08-07, 04:53 PM
I tend to disagree about 'SEE' being a language. It's English words and English grammar using English word order - only using your hands to "voice" them. If it's a language, then it's already got a name -- English. I feel similarly about 'PSE'. ASL is undoubtedly a language, no argument there. The "Sign Language Alphabet" was designed by Gallaudet, based on French SL, and is without a doubt the "ASL" alphabet. 'SEE' and 'PSE' are signing styles that use that alphabet. I have no issues with it being referred to as the "ASL" alphabet.

SEE is still considered as language, but not very popular along deaf world. Actually, my first language was SEE, but learned ASL during my Jr. High school. Right now, I'm using PSE sign language.

Whenever, I get an interpreter, the interpreter would ask me "what kind of language you use? ASL, PSE, or SEE?"

RunBandoRun
05-08-07, 04:57 PM
Ask him to sign "Go away, mooching asshole." Then show him how well you learned. :D

McHawkson
05-08-07, 05:01 PM
Ask him to sign "Go away, mooching asshole." Then show him how well you learned. :D

Nah, you can use this sign language: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b1/Middle_finger.JPG/200px-Middle_finger.JPG

GrimTangent
05-08-07, 05:32 PM
http://www.deafscribe.com/lj/iamhearing.jpg
What the heck are you supposed to do with that?
My mom bought something from a one of these types of guys once. I think it was a eyeglasses repair kit of some kind. That at least seems to have a purpose.

Joe Molotov
05-08-07, 06:31 PM
http://forum.dvdtalk.com/showthread.php?t=485610

The guy didn't even offer to be my friend. :(

JIF
05-08-07, 08:37 PM
I've seen this a number of times, always in a restaurant. I just shake my head and hand the thing back to him.

Jay

Or in a subway car...

AGuyNamedMike
05-08-07, 09:29 PM
Give him a buck, then when he turns to go throw him to the ground and icepick his eardrums. You know, just to be sure.

The Edit King
05-08-07, 09:42 PM
What are you supposed to do with that?From what I hear, cocaine users use them to divide their lines.

AGNJ: GOOD GAWD, SUCK-SAKE & DAMN!!! :eek:

(That would be a great scene in a movie! :lol: )

tasha99
05-08-07, 10:08 PM
http://www.deafscribe.com/lj/iamhearing.jpg



Now that's funny. :lol:

I haven't seen cards in the US, but in Korea there were deaf people who sold stuffed animals and flowers. I bought some stuff from a woman once, and several nights later she came by again but wanted to take a break. She and a bunch of her friends (also deaf) took me out to various soju tents. It was a pretty interesting evening--somehow we managed to communicate between writing and lip reading. Later, after they left, I met some Americans new to Korea and I impersonated an officer which was a stupid thing to do, but worked out okay. As usual, I ordered the chicken feet and watched them eat them. Good times, good times.)

On the down side, I felt obligated to buy junk from the deaf lady and her friends from then on . . .

DVD Josh
05-08-07, 10:59 PM
Didn't even give you a free pencil out of it.

NotThatGuy
05-09-07, 12:08 AM
F'.him.I.would.have.talked.to.the.manager.at.the.restaurant....i'm.there.to.eat.not.give.money.to.so me.guy.who.doesn't.want.to.work.

-p

Deftones
05-09-07, 12:37 AM
When I used to work at this game store here in AZ, there was this androgenous thing that came in and tried to "sell" these things. We'd always politely decline. Then, we'd have to be witness to a deaf fit of rage. Now, I'm not insensitive to people's plights, but it might've been one of the funniest episodes I've ever witnessed. Yelling and screaming, but in deaf, and arms waving wildly. It was hilarious.

Brent L
05-09-07, 12:51 AM
I've heard about these "deaf fits of rage" over and over again, both here and elsewhere. Are you guys serious? What exactly does a fit of that sort entail?

I bet there is one on YouTube, everything else seems to be.

Deftones
05-09-07, 01:00 AM
It's exactly what I said. Flailing arms and grunts/sounds.

Brent L
05-09-07, 01:03 AM
Hmmm, for some reason I didn't read that last part. :lol:

If I was deaf, and I'm sure it is like this for the majority of deaf people, I would be totally ashamed of them and what they're doing.

fundevil
05-09-07, 01:09 AM
People are people,(meh) some are looking for an easy way ...others enjoy work....I have a similar card around here somewhere and only once (slightly) considered trying it out myself.

brooke789
05-09-07, 07:50 AM
I used to shop at the Wal-Mart down the street from this restaurant and always saw these people in the parking lot. I always think they are crazy walking up to people in the parking lot because it scares me. When I'd see them coming I'd get int he car quickly b/c you don't know that it is a deaf person. It could be someone trying to mug you or something.

I cannot believe that a restaurant would let them in to pass out those cards...if nothing else they are taking away from the tips the servers would have received.

lordwow
05-09-07, 07:57 AM
I actually know sign language so it's always fun when they start to flip out and I sign something to them.

But if you want a serious answer, just sign this:
http://commtechlab.msu.edu/SITES/ASLWEB/S/W3760.htm

kenbuzz
05-09-07, 08:07 AM
Of course, one could just sign "no" and turn to ignore him/her, effectively ending the conversation:
http://www.lifeprint.com/asl101/signjpegs/n/no.htm24.jpghttp://www.lifeprint.com/asl101/signjpegs/n/no.htm25.jpg

If you're unable to break visual contact, or if you suspect that they don't get it (maybe you signed it poorly, maybe they're British and don't habla ASL, etc), you can always fall back on some universally understood sign langauge:

http://img84.imageshack.us/img84/6872/futs5.jpg

kenbuzz
05-09-07, 09:01 AM
SEE is still considered as language, but not very popular along deaf world. Actually, my first language was SEE, but learned ASL during my Jr. High school. Right now, I'm using PSE sign language.

Whenever, I get an interpreter, the interpreter would ask me "what kind of language you use? ASL, PSE, or SEE?"Well, we're gonna have to agree to disagree on this one. In my universe, ASL is a language, SEE is a system. As a member of the community, you no doubt know a lot about both, but for the benefit of everyone reading along....

It has been my experience that SEE uses signs to replace spoken words in English word order, word for word, but strips away body language, facial expression, and a whole host of other communication 'markers' that are used to make it easier for folks to understand one another. In a sense, one can think of SEE as "captions" for a spoken dialog. It shows the deaf person what words are being said, but that's all. It's functionally equivalent to having the dialog written down on paper, only the interpreter is using his/her hands to show what each word is. It's up to the reciever to figure out what's actually being said, contextually.

In the sentence "I am going to the store.", the deaf person wouldn't know that the subject of the sentence is "the store" until the end of the sentence. Until you get to that last word, all you know is that I am planning to go somewhere, but just where that is is a mystery. Once you get to the end, you then have to reconstruct the sentence in your head to get the context. English speakers do it automatically, so it's not noticed, but non-native English speakers (including the deaf and folks for whom English isn't their first language) have to filter things and put them into a context they can use before the meaning can be fully grasped. For example, speakers of Romance languages (those decended from Latin, like French, Spanish and Italian) place nouns before the adjectives they are describing (ball blue, car fast). When they hear English speakers introduce the adjective first (blue ball, fast car), that word has to be put "on hold" for a moment until the noun the adjective is describing shows up. English word order requires you to hop back and forth between words, linking up modifiers to identify the subject and action and intuit what the "meaning" of the sentence is. We do it autmoatically, but it introduces a processing overhead burden when done to those who use different sentence forms.

Also, as an interpreter, signing "I am going to the store" in SEE would require that I use SEVEN signs to express a SIX word sentence -- one sign for each English word, plus the grammatical marker "-ing" to modify the verb "go". In this case, SEE would take MORE time than English, and requires more processing on the part of the recipient, all to commuinicate no additional information.

ASL uses spatial representation, facial expression and body language to show relative position of speakers, temporal aspects, tense, feeling, and a whole bunch of stuff that you don't get with words alone. I can sign "I am going to the store" with three signs: "Store, me, go(to)". And if I've already established either "me" or "the store" as a part of the conversation, I might be able to get by with just one sign -- a verb modifying "me" as it "goes" to "the store". I have found that ASL takes less time and communicates as much or more information than English. In some ways, it's a superior language.

As further exampls, ASL has a sign for "butterfly". Until recently, SEE taught to use the signs for "butter" and "fly" in sequential order. ASL has unique signs for "blue" and "blew", while SEE uses the same sign for both homonyms. In both cases, ASL commuincates the same information better and more efficiently than SEE, eliminating the processing burden places on the recipient. Consider how the following sentence would be rendered in English, SEE, and ASL:

"At sea, I blew my chance to see a blue butterfly fly by my butter."

Yeah, it's a goofy sentence, but I'll bet that if given a choice of the three different renderings, the ASL one would be the most clear, succinct, and least confusing. And I'd also wager that the SEE version would require repeating a couple of times before the listener "got" it.

When interpreting for a deaf or hard-of-hearing person, or an audience of mixed "listeners", I am happy to accomodate someone who prefers SEE, though (to be honest) it's much more clunky and in ways much harder to throw at an audience, especially considering that many English words require the use of two SEE signs (see above).

Don't get me wrong... SEE is quite useful in situations where a hearing person is simultaneously talking and signing, becuase it's damn near impossible to talk in English and sign in ASL at the same time. I've tried doing it while addressing a large mixed audience. I couldn't do it, it was too hard. But for folks who aren't congenitally deaf, particularly those who already knew how to speak English before losing their hearing, SEE is a natural way of capitalizing on their native communication method. But again, SEE is a form of Manually Coded English, I don't see it as much more than that.

I guess the whole point I'm aiming at here is that I percieve SEE as merely a mechanical means of translating spoken words into manual signs, while I believe ASL to be a translation of the meaning bing communicated by those spoken words AND as a standalone language in its own right. Both have their place, but I feel pretty strongly that of the two only ASL is a "language".

lordwow
05-09-07, 09:10 AM
I agree with Ken 100%.

Sonicflood
05-09-07, 09:30 AM
I had this happen at my office a couple of months ago. The guy just walked right past the receptionist/front counter and busted into my office. I was meeting with clients at the time.

He made some noise that I assume was hello & threw one of those things on my desk. I shook my head indicating NO. He then started making all kinds of noises and pounding on my desk.

I finally had it and wrote on a piece of paper: Get out of my office right now or I'm calling the police. He then snatched up his piece of paper and moaned all the way out the front door.

My clients & the receptionist all had the whole "deer in the headlights" look. It was kinda surreal.

McHawkson
05-09-07, 10:17 AM
When I used to work at this game store here in AZ, there was this androgenous thing that came in and tried to "sell" these things. We'd always politely decline. Then, we'd have to be witness to a deaf fit of rage. Now, I'm not insensitive to people's plights, but it might've been one of the funniest episodes I've ever witnessed. Yelling and screaming, but in deaf, and arms waving wildly. It was hilarious.

I have seen my friend do that when movie manager refused give us a discount. I looked at him like "WTF??" It was embarrassed!

Fok
05-09-07, 10:31 AM
Happens here in Canada all the time. Quite annoying when you're trying enjoy a meal

kenbuzz
05-09-07, 10:40 AM
Yeah, but give them a break, being deaf in Canada is tougher than here in the US. They have do sign an extra word at the end of every question.

RunBandoRun
05-09-07, 11:08 AM
Yeah, but give them a break, being deaf in Canada is tougher than here in the US. They have do sign an extra word at the end of every question.

Eh? ;)

mickey65
05-09-07, 11:13 AM
Back in the late 80's when I was living in California and riding the BART trains to and from work, there were some deaf guys working the trains passing out those cards with the hand signs on it - so you could learn the alphabet.

Call me jaded, but with all the homeless and the druggies with their hands out for money everywhere in the Bay Area, I just wasn't sure if these guys were actually deaf - or just running a scam, so I never gave any money.

McHawkson
05-09-07, 11:13 AM
Which part in Canada?

I've met a group of deaf people in Victoria (some of them are from Vancouver), they seems to use ASL and did not use any "extra" word at the end of every question. :shrug:

But those people have told me that getting a job in Canada is almost impossible for them. I asked them why not and they pulled discrimination card. I can guess 3/4 of the group (of about 50 people) are on welfare.

Dr. Henry Jones, Jr.
05-09-07, 11:16 AM
Yeah, but give them a break, being deaf in Canada is tougher than here in the US. They have do sign an extra word at the end of every question.

I think being deaf would have the same level of difficulty no matter where you live.

Randy Miller III
05-09-07, 11:17 AM
Whoosh!

mickey65
05-09-07, 11:17 AM
It's exactly what I said. Flailing arms and grunts/sounds.

The apartment complex I used to live in a year ago, there was a deaf guy who lived there and he'd have a friend come by to visit and they'd stand out in the parking lot, "talking". They make these moaning sounds while they are signing back and forth to each other - the more emotional the conversation - the louder the moaning.

Of course since they are deaf, they don't realize all the noise they are making!

He had some deaf lesbian friends staying with him at one point, and one of the ex-girlfriends came by and started up an "arguement" out in the parking lot. Imagine all the loud "moaning" (screaming) that was going on - 3 deaf women throwing hand signs at each other - all pissed off! What a sight that was.

rw2516
05-09-07, 11:52 AM
One year this kid was going around shoveling snow off people's sidewalks and driveways. He'd shovel first and then knock asking for money.
The kid shoveled my walk and then knocked on the door:

"Yeah?"

"I shoveled your walk and driveway for you."

"Thanks" and I shut the door

If he'd asked me first I would have paid him. Pissed me off the way he did it.

lordwow
05-09-07, 12:01 PM
Which part in Canada?

I've met a group of deaf people in Victoria (some of them are from Vancouver), they seems to use ASL and did not use any "extra" word at the end of every question. :shrug:

Eh?

Bandoman
05-09-07, 12:05 PM
Whoosh!

http://www.mindspring.com/~boycekb/images/Smilies/OverHead.gif

McHawkson
05-09-07, 12:09 PM
Eh?

It's called Bad English. ;)

Jack Straw
05-09-07, 03:31 PM
Up until now I have resisted the urge to sound off on this thread. However, I vaguely recall having this happen to me a long time ago. I was pretty annoyed at the a-hole for interrupting my meal and being in my space to basically panhandle while I'm paying good money to have a nice meal out. This ticks me off more than the ones you run into on the street. At least there you can get away or try to avoid them if you don't want to deal with them. In this case, there was no easy or polite escape. If I were the OP, I would have reported this occurence to the manager right away and let him know that his customers were being shaken down by this person and strongly urge them to remove them from the establishment. Now if this ever happens to me again, I won't have to think how do deal with the clown.

kenbuzz
05-10-07, 06:42 AM
http://www.mindspring.com/~boycekb/images/Smilies/OverHead.gifAgreed.

Great smiley, btw.

Bandoman
05-10-07, 08:08 AM
Agreed.

Great smiley, btw.

Courtesy of Talemyn.

NotThatGuy
05-10-07, 09:45 AM
One year this kid was going around shoveling snow off people's sidewalks and driveways. He'd shovel first and then knock asking for money.
The kid shoveled my walk and then knocked on the door:

"Yeah?"

"I shoveled your walk and driveway for you."

"Thanks" and I shut the door

If he'd asked me first I would have paid him. Pissed me off the way he did it.

Yeah, lesson learned for that kid.

-p

NORML54601
05-17-07, 05:27 PM
I was at the bar yesterday and there was a deaf guy who came in with a notebook that said something like. Hi, I'm deaf and I will mow your lawn for $10 for every 15 min of work. He was riding a bike with a cart attached to the back and a lawnmower in it.
At least he was offering some sort of service, albeit at a pretty steep rate. I found his choice of advertising venues to be a bit odd though.

CKMorpheus
05-17-07, 05:59 PM
Got that same exact card at a Wendy's in the Staten Island Mall in NY.