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Some schools ban tag, touch football, and soccer, because they're "dangerous." [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum
 
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View Full Version : Some schools ban tag, touch football, and soccer, because they're "dangerous."


grundle
06-30-06, 05:44 AM
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2006-06-26-recess-bans_x.htm

Health and Behavior

'Not it!' More schools ban games at recess

6/27/2006

By Emily Bazar, USA TODAY

Some traditional childhood games are disappearing from school playgrounds because educators say they're dangerous.

Elementary schools in Cheyenne, Wyo., and Spokane, Wash., banned tag at recess this year. Others, including a suburban Charleston, S.C., school, dumped contact sports such as soccer and touch football.

In other cities, including Wichita; San Jose, Calif.; Beaverton, Ore.; and Rancho Santa Fe., Calif., schools took similar actions earlier.

The bans were passed in the name of safety, but some children's health advocates say limiting exercise and free play can inhibit a child's development.

Groups such as the National School Boards Association don't keep statistics on school games.

But several experts, including Donna Thompson of the National Program for Playground Safety, verify the trend. Dodge ball has been out at some schools for years, but banning games such as tag and soccer is a newer development.

"It's happening more," Thompson says. Educators worry about "kids running into one another" and getting hurt, she says.

In January, Freedom Elementary School in Cheyenne prohibited tag at recess because it "progresses easily into slapping and hitting and pushing instead of just touching," Principal Cindy Farwell says.

Contact sports were banned from recess at Charles Pinckney Elementary early this year, says Charleston County schools spokeswoman Mary Girault, because children suffered broken arms and dislocated fingers playing touch football and soccer.

Some schools that ban games at recess allow children to play them in gym class under supervision.

Critics of the bans say playing freely helps kids learn to negotiate rules and resolve disputes.

"They learn to change and to problem-solve," says Rhonda Clements, an education professor at Manhattanville College.

Joe Frost, emeritus professor of early childhood education at the University of Texas-Austin, sees playground restrictions as harmful.

"You're taking away the physical development of the children," he says. "Having time for play is essential for children to keep their weight under control."

kvrdave
06-30-06, 06:28 AM
I think kids today exercise far too much as it is.

Bacon
06-30-06, 06:30 AM
Nothing like raising a nation of pussified kids

Nick Danger
06-30-06, 06:40 AM
I am shocked that children are still allowed to have 'recess'. Every injury that kids got when I was that age was caused by it. Children are safest when they have sitting quietly contests.

Bandoman
06-30-06, 06:54 AM
Let them watch other people play games on TV. There's much less chance of injury that way.

The Bus
06-30-06, 07:05 AM
The reports for injuries were sponsored by EA (makers of Touch Madden 2007) and Activision (Tony Hawk's Tag, You're It: Extreme).

Red Dog
06-30-06, 08:31 AM
I think they should play poker at recess.

VinVega
06-30-06, 08:53 AM
I think they should play poker at recess.
Well, according to ESPN it's a sport.

Dominos is also another viable sport for them. :up:

JasonF
06-30-06, 09:05 AM
Well, according to ESPN it's a sport.

Dominos is also another viable sport for them. :up:

Slow down there, Evel Knievel -- those dominoes can have pretty sharp corners. Someone might get hurt!

Mrs. Danger
06-30-06, 09:47 AM
When are they going to figure out that the school system can't be fixed, and just give up?

Tag is dangerous? sheesh!

ZakVTA
06-30-06, 09:53 AM
Slow down there, Evel Knievel -- those dominoes can have pretty sharp corners. Someone might get hurt!
Exactly, and can you imagine the paper cuts coming from playing poker? It's too horrible to even think about.

Mrs. Danger
06-30-06, 09:56 AM
You can't let them play video games, either, they might get carpal tunnel.

Better just keep them in a padded bubble until they are 18.

AGuyNamedMike
06-30-06, 09:57 AM
You can't let them play video games, either, they might get carpal tunnel.

Better just keep them in a padded bubble until they are 18.

Too expensive. I'd prefer a program of mandatory sterilization to prevent the little monsters in the first place. We can grow the replacements we need in vats or something, and decant them at maturity.

FantasticVSDoom
06-30-06, 10:06 AM
There's always competitive eating...Which should be a perfect sport for our youth now.

DRG
06-30-06, 11:13 AM
Educators worry about "kids running into one another" and getting hurt, she says.

It's better to learn collision avoidance on the playground than in the street.

RunBandoRun
06-30-06, 11:16 AM
When I think of how I risked death riding a bike without a helmet, climbing trees without a net or something under them, stubbed my toes and scraped my knees without my parents filing suit against some slob for the capital offense of having a concrete driveway with a curb ... gee, it's a wonder I lived past 1973.

M2theAX
06-30-06, 11:26 AM
Better yet we shouldn't even have kids becuae 99.999% of their injuries occur once they leave the womb. Lets protect them by not having them =D

milo bloom
06-30-06, 11:31 AM
When I think of how I risked death riding a bike without a helmet, climbing trees without a net or something under them, stubbed my toes and scraped my knees without my parents filing suit against some slob for the capital offense of having a concrete driveway with a curb ... gee, it's a wonder I lived past 1973.


Despite past differences, this is one post of yours I wholeheartedly agree with (though I wasn't born till 1974 :p ) I would spend summers with family in West Virginia and always came home with scrapes, bumps, bruises and once a black eye.

sherm42
06-30-06, 11:32 AM
I remember the days of riding in the back of pickup trucks. You'd be arrested today if you let your kids ride in the back of a pickup.

kgrogers1979
06-30-06, 11:45 AM
Touch football is dangerous. Seriously, I broke my nose playing touch football in my high school PE class. I ran into some guy's elbow and shattered my nose like a busted watermelon. At least, I got out of school for the rest of the day.

Kittydreamer
06-30-06, 12:01 PM
When are they going to figure out that the school system can't be fixed, and just give up?

Tag is dangerous? sheesh!

I'm so with you here, Mrs. D. Shoot, my sister broke her ankle at school jumping off the swings and she turned out just fine. Next they're going to tell us that playground equipment is dangerous???

Gunshy
06-30-06, 12:24 PM
Kids still get recess? C'mon, just read a book about kids having recess. Oh yeah, kid could get a paper cut. Just play a books-on-tape about kids reading about kids having recess. Be safe, be quiet. :rolleyes:

-Gunshy

cdollaz
06-30-06, 12:44 PM
I guess dodgeball is out also. Do kids still play "smear the queer"? We used to play that everyday at recess. Basically there is one ball and whoever has it is the "queer." Everyone else tries to tackle him until he either throws the ball away (pussy) or gets tackled and someone else grabs the ball.

Ranger
06-30-06, 12:57 PM
Yeah, recess usually was when people got hurt from sports and got in fights.

I've always thought that the school day should be cut shorter to maybe like 4 hours. When I was in private school, there wasn't an all-out recess, we only had PE for one class at a time which I think is a bit better and safer.

Red Dog
06-30-06, 01:01 PM
4 hours?! The public school days (and school year) are ridiculously short as it is (what is it - 6.5 hours?). My private school (for high school) was 8-5 and 8-4 for the lower grades.

McHawkson
06-30-06, 01:03 PM
Soccer = dangerous? Don't make me laugh... :rolleyes:

Red Dog
06-30-06, 01:03 PM
I guess dodgeball is out also. Do kids still play "smear the queer"? We used to play that everyday at recess. Basically there is one ball and whoever has it is the "queer." Everyone else tries to tackle him until he either throws the ball away (pussy) or gets tackled and someone else grabs the ball.


That was a recess staple in elementary school for us - great game.

grundle
06-30-06, 01:13 PM
When I think of how I risked death riding a bike without a helmet, climbing trees without a net or something under them, stubbed my toes and scraped my knees without my parents filing suit against some slob for the capital offense of having a concrete driveway with a curb ... gee, it's a wonder I lived past 1973.

Wow!

And to think I was only expecting to live to 100.

Ranger
06-30-06, 01:15 PM
4 hours?! The public school days (and school year) are ridiculously short as it is (what is it - 6.5 hours?). My private school (for high school) was 8-5 and 8-4 for the lower grades.
It always was my opinion that the school day was bloated. Is recess, cooking, art, music, and shop class really all that important? I think not.

The school day should consist of only hardcore English, math, history, and science. Some exceptions can be made for grade school of course. :)

xmiyux
06-30-06, 01:21 PM
It always was my opinion that the school day was bloated. Is recess, cooking, art, music, and shop class really all that important? I think not.

The school day should consist of only hardcore English, math, history, and science. Some exceptions can be made for grade school of course. :)

There are students though who will be working as simple laborers and things like shop classes really help those kids out. They might not be having success in normal book based classes but discover they love home ec and cooking - could interest them in culinary things. Or the same thing with shop and they could go on to an apprenticeship. Having a good breadth of topics to study/explore i think is very effective for kids.

mrpayroll
06-30-06, 01:24 PM
While most of the posts here have been sarcastic, I have a serious one.

Let's get all of those lazy ass, stay at home parents who watch tv all day, to spend time at school watching the kids during recess. This way the kids can still play the games that we grew up loving and playing with almost no injuries to ourselves.

When I'm playing with the kids around the apartments or they are playing with each other, I make sure that the games stay civil and that no one gets hurt.

So, instead of banning these games that were once acceptable to all, let's get the parents to finally take an interest in what their kids are doing. :thumbsup:

Chris

Ranger
06-30-06, 01:27 PM
But in general, claases like shop are more about hobby-related learning. I think such classes should not be provided by public funding.

xmiyux
06-30-06, 01:30 PM
So, instead of banning these games that were once acceptable to all, let's get the parents to finally take an interest in what their kids are doing. :thumbsup:

Chris

There is a shocking thought. It astounds me how little interest there frequently is anymore. At times i have had to call home on a kid and speak to their parents and an astounding majority of the time the parents seem very non-commital or dstracted and there is never any offer to help solve whatever the problem is. Just last year i called for the first time and had a parent tell me "Don't worry, i will take care of the problem and make sure it doesn't occur again." In total shock my only response was, "Really?" It is kind of sad that that response to a teacher call is so rare.

xmiyux
06-30-06, 01:38 PM
But in general, claases like shop are more about hobby-related learning. I think such classes should not be provided by public funding.

Aside from the discussion of what should be funded or not (politics forum here we come ;))

They have been phasing out shop/mechanical classes in my area and the home ec programs are gone for the most part already. The shop classes at some of the schools actually do things like small engine breakdowns, reassembly, and repair - pretty neat programs. The home ec programs i think being gone is very bad though. Many adults don't cook anymore so the kids aren;t learning how to at all. Simple repairs like sewing on a button boggles some kids minds. Home ec also used to do things like mock checkbooks and budgeting and important life skills.

I understand an excellent argument is that parents should be teaching them these skills - but many aren't :(

Damfino
06-30-06, 01:42 PM
Overprotective parents + too many greedy lawyers = scared school districts

Ranger
06-30-06, 01:46 PM
Yeah, I know some of those classes are fun. I had shop in high school and for that class, we did a variety of things from working on wood, welding, and rebuilding lawn mower engines. Although I didn't think they were all that relevant. To touch the political border again, I think children do have a right to basic education and basic being the keyword here.

Mrs. Danger
07-01-06, 10:43 AM
"Shop" classes should provide a basic education in mechanical skills and use of tools. It should also cover basic car maintenance.

"Home ec" should provide education in household finances, stocking an efficent pantry, basic nutrition and menu planning (the practical end, which is not covered in science classes) and cooking. This class could also be a basic business class, covering the ideas of keeping stock, accounts receivable and payable, use of credit.

Both shop and home ec should be required for all students. Yes! Make the boys take home ec, and the girls take shop. It never hurts a young man to know know to feed himself, and a young woman to know how to put water in her radiator.

But, I look forward to this happening with just as much hope as I look forward to science classes actually teaching hands-on science, and math classes teaching how to calculate APR, and history classes teaching what really happened and why.

I don't know what the kids do all day in the public schools around here, but learning useful life skills is not on the list.

Bacon
07-01-06, 11:06 AM
When will the shcools start banning student/teacher sex?

xmiyux
07-01-06, 11:30 AM
I don't know what the kids do all day in the public schools around here, but learning useful life skills is not on the list.

Simple answer to that is much of the focus is on training to get a good score on the useless standardized tests all the states force on the system or even more useless (imo) character education stuff.

TomOpus
07-01-06, 01:16 PM
Yes! Make the boys take home ec, When I was a senior in high school, they made us boys take "Bachelor Survival" for a semester. Seriously, that's what they called it.

We had to learn such things as sewing and planning/cooking an entire meal.

Red Dog
07-01-06, 01:23 PM
When I was a senior in high school, they made us boys take "Bachelor Survival" for a semester. Seriously, that's what they called it.

We had to learn such things as sewing and planning/cooking an entire meal.

:lol: I actually could have used that - I can't sew, and I iron for shit.

yakuza70
07-01-06, 07:55 PM
Overprotective parents + too many greedy lawyers = scared school districts

I'm an elementary school teacher and I couldn't have said it any better!

Many aren't allowed to play outside in their house because it's too dangerous so they stay inside most of the time. With all the ORGANIZED sports and other ORGANIZED activities kids are heavily involved with today, many kids have a hard time knowing how to "play" or organize "pick-up" games of soccer, football, etc. without adults telling them what to do. Recess is one of the few times for many kids to have some time for free play.

TomOpus
07-01-06, 07:57 PM
:lol: I actually could have used that - I can't sew, and I iron for shit.Another one falls through the cracks :(

mndtrp
07-03-06, 04:08 AM
I took a class in High School called "Life Skills". I thought it was going to be a class that taught me skills I would need in life. Such as sewing buttons, eating properly, pretty much a home ec class. Instead, it taught me all about drinking and drugs. I was very disappointed in it.

I don't see the problem with these games at recess. I had my nose smashed in because I jumped off a piece of playground equipment, and that thing still stands to this day. Instead of getting rid of it, it taught me to not do that again. If someone gets hurt by running into someone bigger than them, it will teach that person not to do it again.

The "Chicks dig scars" people are going to have to find a different phrase.

cajun_junky
07-03-06, 11:42 AM
My wife is an elementary school teacher and has mentioned a number of games that are now banned for various reasons including duck-duck-goose. Apparently this game allows students to discriminate against other students.

Basically children now-a-days can't do anything physical and we wonder why there is an increasing rate of obesity in our children!!! Geez.....

RunBandoRun
07-03-06, 12:15 PM
My mother didn't expect my brothers to do much around the house other than help Dad take out the trash and mow the lawn. Since there were four of them, they were, shall we say, underutilized. :lol:

As the only girl, I did manage to learn how to cook and clean, but I have no idea how to mow a lawn or take care of a car. I wish I had taken some kind of auto maintenance class in school, if only so I won't feel so stupid now when I have to call Triple A and find out it was some stupid thing I could have fixed myself if I wasn't such a priss.

Three of my brothers managed to learn how to cook -- in fact, one does it for a living. But they all live like slobs except for the one neatnik. I wish my mom had taught them to clean house. Their ex-wives would probably all have appreciated it too. :D

mllefoo
07-03-06, 12:21 PM
Nothing like raising a nation of pussified kids

The hub just said, "It's a shame we're still breeding males because we don't want them."

Yeah, it's a good idea to ban all activity because everything in the world is dangerous.

wendersfan
07-03-06, 12:23 PM
I can iron, but I've never learned to sew, much to my chagrin. :(

mllefoo
07-03-06, 12:24 PM
I guess dodgeball is out also. Do kids still play "smear the queer"? We used to play that everyday at recess. Basically there is one ball and whoever has it is the "queer." Everyone else tries to tackle him until he either throws the ball away (pussy) or gets tackled and someone else grabs the ball.

No. Now they play "empathy for the homosexual."

Bandoman
07-03-06, 12:55 PM
I just thought of a new game everyone can play! It's called "Everybody's Equal." The kids sit in a circle, and everyone gets to hold the ball for the exact same amount of time until recess is over.

RunBandoRun
07-03-06, 01:28 PM
I just thought of a new game everyone can play! It's called "Everybody's Equal." The kids sit in a circle, and everyone gets to hold the ball for the exact same amount of time until recess is over.

This will be excellent at the kindergarten level ... it will immediately precede nap time. :D

cruzness
07-03-06, 10:26 PM
This is why our kids will be a bunch of fat handholding dummies with no competitive drive. 'games are dangerous', 'red ink makes them feel hurt', Dodgeball is the devil. :D

resinrats
07-03-06, 10:57 PM
Next they will get rid of recess and gym class all together and in its place will have kids laying on those mats and sleeping for a 1/2 hour. What sort of pansy gets hurt taking a nap....none.

naughty jonny
07-03-06, 11:13 PM
While most of the posts here have been sarcastic, I have a serious one.

Let's get all of those lazy ass, stay at home parents who watch tv all day, to spend time at school watching the kids during recess. This way the kids can still play the games that we grew up loving and playing with almost no injuries to ourselves.

When I'm playing with the kids around the apartments or they are playing with each other, I make sure that the games stay civil and that no one gets hurt.

So, instead of banning these games that were once acceptable to all, let's get the parents to finally take an interest in what their kids are doing. :thumbsup:

Chris

God no. I don't want to have Little Billy's father watching my kid play. Who knows what perverted thoughts are going through his mind. Maybe he's looking at my Mary with a "special uncle" glint in his eye. Better that I'm the one who looks after the kids because I know that I'm the only one who's straight enough to look after my kid....

...oh wait, but if <b>I</b> look after the kids and something happens, then Little Billy's father might sue me because I was looking after them. Probably best if I don't attend either....

At the end of the day, it doesn't just come down to laziness on behalf of the parent, it's also an increasing lack of trust in the people around us. People are scared enough to let their kids walk 100 yards to the nearest shop, let alone leave them alone in a playground with another parent. Rather than send the kids to play in the backyard where they might *shock, horror* hurt themselves, it's better to stick them in front of the television so that you know where they are at all times.

After all, it's far better to have a fat <i>safe</i> kid who is 90%* likely to die at 40* due to obesity than have run the 0.05%* risk of something serious happening that might be associated with having a normal balanced healthy kid.

*Disclaimer: figures are completely made up and have no basis in fact.

kgrogers1979
07-03-06, 11:17 PM
Next they will get rid of recess and gym class all together and in its place will have kids laying on those mats and sleeping for a 1/2 hour. What sort of pansy gets hurt taking a nap....none.


Yeah and they should have counselors there in case one of the kids has a nightmare and needs some comforting when he wakes up.