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If a check is made out to 2 people, are both required to sign? [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum
 
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View Full Version : If a check is made out to 2 people, are both required to sign?


Toad
02-26-06, 07:23 PM
This is related to depositing, not to cashing, in case there's a difference.

Just curious.

4KRG
02-26-06, 07:25 PM
Yes

Bandoman
02-26-06, 07:26 PM
Yes

What he said.

DVD Polizei
02-26-06, 07:28 PM
No. Have one of the people sign for the other person's name on the back.

DVD Josh
02-26-06, 08:12 PM
Whether it's true or not, my bank has never enforced the rule.

Ranger
02-26-06, 08:36 PM
hmm, probably not if they have a joint banking account. but i'm just guessing...

TomOpus
02-26-06, 08:43 PM
Maybe call the bank you're taking it to and see what they say?

Bacon
02-26-06, 08:49 PM
I don't know but this thread is begging for a title change :lol:

kvrdave
02-26-06, 08:58 PM
My bank requires both to cash it but only one to deposit it. Pretty stupid when you consider that I could deposit it, then write a check for the amount and have them cash it. :shrug:

Sdallnct
02-26-06, 09:15 PM
Yes, but some banks enforce it more then others. However, just because YOUR bank will accept it, doesn't mean the bank where the check is drawn on will.

This happens at my work all the time. We issues a check to two parties, only one signs and their bank takes it, but our bank will kick it back.

Ranger
02-26-06, 09:18 PM
if there's one line on the check, who signs on top?

DVD Polizei
02-26-06, 09:53 PM
If a chic makes out with 2 people, are both required to sign?

DVD Polizei
02-26-06, 09:53 PM
Yes, but some banks enforce it more then others. However, just because YOUR bank will accept it, doesn't mean the bank where the check is drawn on will.

This happens at my work all the time. We issues a check to two parties, only one signs and their bank takes it, but our bank will kick it back.

Your bank sucks, dude. :p

Heat
02-27-06, 02:13 AM
Depends. If it's "or" between the names, then no. If "and", then yes, though it's really up to the bank to say "no".

GatorDeb
02-27-06, 03:36 AM
What Heat said, except it's not up to the bank, it's a hard rule.

Prakis
02-27-06, 07:07 AM
If the check is deposited into an account that has the same names on it then nobody is required to sign it. You can just put deposit only on the back of it. If you want any kind of cash back from it then you both are supposed to sign it. And there is nothing to stop you from depositing the whole thing then doing a withdrawal in a seperate transaction. I used to be a bank teller in a previous life ;)

Toad
02-28-06, 08:48 PM
I called my bank (Bank of America), and they said not only does the 2nd person's signature have to be on the check in order to deposit it, but s/he has to be PRESENT when the deposit is made.

silentbob007
02-28-06, 09:52 PM
Another rule is that you are supposed to sign your name exactly as it is written on the check ... so if there is a full name/nickname/middle initial/misspelling, etc ... you sign it that way, then use your normal signature underneath. The credit union where I worked didn't process its own checks, but instead sent them to Wells Fargo, which would then send them back if they noticed that these rules weren't follow. Yikes.

mbs
02-28-06, 10:01 PM
This is related to depositing, not to cashing, in case there's a difference.

Just curious.

At my two banks (US Bank and Bank of America):

To deposit a check, no. You don't need any signature to deposit a check.* Just write "For Deposit Only" on the signature line.

* This is assuming that the check is written to the holder(s) of the account to have the check deposited.

However, I'd assume that if both people are not listed on the account to get the check deposit, you would need the other signature.

It seems like YMMV though depending on your bank. I never sign my deposit checks unless I am getting cash out as well. Although silly, I've always been paranoid someone would steal my check after I signed it.

Sdallnct
02-28-06, 10:04 PM
Your bank sucks, dude. :p

Humm, no offense but it is done to protect the people who are on the check. I'm mean if the money was not supposed to be for multiple people why are they on there? Besides in our case, we are issuing drafts based on a legal contract, it has to be endorsed by all parties.

Now in all honesty, 99% of the time it is only an issue if someone complains. For example, I travel a lot for work so my wife is signing my name all over town. Fine with me, I trust her. But, I could make an issue of it if I wanted.

spainlinx0
03-01-06, 10:09 AM
I'm currently killing time while I finish school as a teller, and I'll tell you what our policy is. If you're cashing or depositing and you do not have a joint account with the person then both people have to be there with ID. If you have a joint account and are depositing then you have to have both signatures, but the other person doesn't have to be present. If you want to cash then the other person has to be there as well, unless we know you as a customer. This is Wachovia if you were curious. However obviously teller enforcement of rules is going to vary by laziness or lack of knowledge. To be honest my understanding of the rules could be wrong because you're always getting different information from different people. As a floating teller I get 10 different kinds of rules every week it seems like.

cpgator
03-01-06, 10:58 AM
Just to add a new twist...

I deposited a check yesterday that had two names on it and neither was mine. There was no "and" or "or", just the two names listed, one on top of the other. I just wrote "for deposit only" on the back.

The account that it went into had only one of the names on the check associated with it, but the account also had my name on it. So, in a way I deposited a check written to someone else into my account.

The bank did the deposit without any questions.