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moving a bathroom sink about 2 feet...difficult? [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum
 
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View Full Version : moving a bathroom sink about 2 feet...difficult?


heimerSWT
01-08-06, 09:30 PM
I am remodelling my bathroom, and will be removing the old coultured marble counter top. It is a lovely chocolate/vanilla swirl design, but it just isn't my color. ;) The width of the counter space is 60" and the single sink is all the way on the right side of that width.

I would like to replace the countertop with a tiled one, and want to move the sink to the middle of the space. Is this major plumbing work? Can I just extend the drainpipe and the inlet hoses? Is this way more work than it will be worth? I'd like to do it myself, if possible. Thanks...

kvrdave
01-08-06, 11:34 PM
If you are just moving the sink, then it isn't a big problem. You just get different drain pipes and work your way from where it is now to where you want it. Should be simple enough. The only time it gets to be awful is when you are actually moving the plumbing underneath where they come up, like if you are putting the sink on a new wall, etc. But if the "guts" will still be underneath the existing space, then it is pretty simple.

heimerSWT
01-09-06, 11:32 AM
So, Dave...I can just get an extender and maybe an L shaped connector or two, and extend the drain, and I won't have any draining problems with the sink? I just want to make sure this is workable before I dive into the project. I assume it will be fairly easy to extend the hot/cold inlets.

Just to clarify, this is what I want to do:

this:
---------
O
---------

to this:
---------
O
---------

The water and drain pipes come from the wall. Slab foundation.

emanon
01-09-06, 11:51 AM
...and I won't have any draining problems with the sink?

This is the part that would concern me. Hopefully, someone knows better than I do...

kvrdave
01-09-06, 12:52 PM
Shouldn't be a problem. Most drains require something like a 2" drop over 10 feet, and you are doing anything nearly that bad. It will all still go to a P trap and that doesn't slow you down. Your fall after that is probably straight down, so your drainage shouldn't be affected at all.

kvrdave
01-09-06, 12:53 PM
So the pipes com up straight to the sink now? Won't matter, but I am curious.

heimerSWT
01-09-06, 01:00 PM
No, I think the pipes come up from the foundation, through the wall, and then to the sink.

Like this:
http://www.hometips.com/images/hyhw/plumbing/85.gif

This is exactly how the plumbing looks underneath the sink.

kvrdave
01-09-06, 01:12 PM
Yeah, no problem, then. You will just have a drain pipe that runs over to the P trap and into the sink.

heimerSWT
01-09-06, 01:18 PM
The P Trap will remain under the sink then? Meaning, the extension will be between the wall and the P Trap?

McHawkson
01-09-06, 01:22 PM
Yes, you need the extension between trap and wall.

ANDREMIKE
01-09-06, 01:53 PM
It should be easy. and no you shouldn't have to major plumbing. the only problem is what type of vanity are you putting in? If it has a cabinet in the center and drawers on the right and left, then the drawers on the right may not close properly. Its a chance you will have to take. There usually is some room but you will have to keep the plumbing as close as possible to the back wall.

heimerSWT
01-09-06, 01:55 PM
Thanks, Dave (and everyone else) for the assistance. :)

It should be easy. and no you shouldn't have to major plumbing. the only problem is what type of vanity are you putting in? If it has a cabinet in the center and drawers on the right and left, then the drawers on the right may not close properly. Its a chance you will have to take. There usually is some room but you will have to keep the plumbing as close as possible to the back wall.
I will be making adjustments to the current vanity for this.