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View Full Version : Legit Distance Ed Masters Programs?


moorehed
10-03-05, 10:46 AM
Are there any decent Masters Programs that can be completed on line from a remote location? I am not sure if this is what I want to do, but I am sure I don't want a degree that would be looked down on because of the school it was from... but it is hard to tell what is reputable and what is not.

DodgingCars
10-03-05, 11:07 AM
Univ. of Phoenix. They're expensive. Check out your local universities too. The university I graduated from had some online masters programs.

BigDan
10-03-05, 11:20 AM
Depending on what you want to do, there are many online programs from many different traditional universities all across the U.S.

MBA programs are the easiest to find. I don't know what you want to study, though.

moorehed
10-03-05, 11:43 AM
See I don't think I'd want to put U of Phoenix on my resume... just doesn't sound legit. Maybe that's just me. Shaq is a graduate.

I would probably want to do either MIS or MBA w/some type of Econ concentration.

moorehed
10-03-05, 11:49 AM
on a related note, anyone know how long GMAT scores are good for? I took it almost 4 years ago.

al_bundy
10-03-05, 11:50 AM
Don't know about the master's program but an MBA I talked to from Carnegie Mellon who works for Ernest and Young says it's not considered a bad school.

90% of colleges aren't special or known outside their immmediate areas so unless you go to a brand name school it doesn't really matter.

I'm not 100% sure but I think that MBA credentials are accredited by the AACSB and they require a physical classroom environment. UoP follows the coursework, but it's online. Someone I used to work with has a wife that did the MBA program from UoP for a little while. I think she worked at Cantor Fitzgerald and they paid for it. She quit after a few months because it was too much work.

jonw9
10-03-05, 12:18 PM
I know Michigan State has some online Master's programs, but I guess it would depend on what you are looking for.

www.msu.edu

Deftones
10-03-05, 12:50 PM
Depends on the school and area you are trying to get into. I know some business locally look down on a degree from University of Phoenix, but others don't. I'd talk to people in your field that you want to get into.

moorehed
10-03-05, 01:09 PM
but the spartans couldn't even take care of the wolverines saturday... how can i trust them with my education?

- sad spartans fan

jonw9
10-03-05, 05:57 PM
Wow, I thought that reply would come a lot sooner.

eightiesguy
10-03-05, 06:46 PM
I received my MAT from Marygrove (www.marygrove.edu).

It was a very easy (and affordable) way to go. It was about $1800 a semester and the program lasted for 5 semesters. The program had to be none with a group of at least 3 other teachers, and you had to meet every couple of weeks and audio tape responses to questions from your study guides.

UWSarge
10-03-05, 06:48 PM
I'm going to USC through distance ed. It's mostly geared towards engineering type classes though and expensive. (Work picks up the tab, but it's about $3500 per 3 credit hour class)

Also, there'd be no mention on the diploma that I did it as "distance education." Just would say I achieved it from USC.

jonw9
10-04-05, 08:50 AM
UNC has some distance programs:
#
# Education
# Friday Center/Continuing Education
# Journalism & Mass Communication
# Medicine
# Nursing
# Public Health
# Social Work
# Transatlantic Masters Program

I don't know if one of those is what you are looking for, but would be in-state tuition.

jrobinson
10-04-05, 01:37 PM
most universities are offering some distance program or another. Just check schools you are interested in having a diploma from...

goofee girl
10-04-05, 03:12 PM
Peterson's has a terrific search for distance programs. Be certain to check that the schools you're interested in are regionally accredited. Although I have never come across any unaccredited schools on their list for my needs, it's possible that some might pop up here and there.

Here's the link: Peterson's (http://petersons.com/distancelearning/code/search.asp?path=ce.fas.distance)

Goldberg74
10-04-05, 04:29 PM
My mom is currently getting her masters in education from Grand Canyon University (http://www.gcu.edu/). She started in January and likes it so far. It's one class at a time and they are 5 to 6 weeks each.

Check it out if you'd like.

matta
10-05-05, 06:52 PM
on a related note, anyone know how long GMAT scores are good for? I took it almost 4 years ago.

5 years.


I read an article on distance learning the other day. According to the article, a Princeton study found that, in general, distance education degrees are considered equal to traditional degrees when they come from an established brick-and-mortar university. Degrees from traditionally online schools, such as University of Phoenix, are considered less prestigious, but have gained substantial ground in the last 5 years.

The exception was MBA programs. MBA programs completed online were looked down upon by nearly all MBA recruiters. The bottom line was that if you want to advance your existing career, an online MBA is a good way to do it. If you want to change fields to go into finance, for instance, an online MBA is a bad idea.

If you want an engineering degree, there are plenty of good online programs, including Georgia Tech, Michigan, University of Illinois, etc. For business schools, there are also several good universities, such as the University of Maryland (UC), Duke, etc. that are online. You can even get a J.D. (law degree) online. These include schools like Taft University, Concord University, etc. Be careful with law, though. Online law schools are usually registered with the state of California and not with the ABA (the ABA directly forbids accredition to online J.D.s, though I believe LLM's are ok). IF you graduate from an ABA accredited law school, you can practice anywhere in the nation, but if you graduate from a non-ABA school, then you can only practice in the states that approved your program (and very few approve online programs to allow you to sit for the bar -- hence why all those online schools are in CA). You can sit for the CA bar and become a CA attorney, but you likely won't be able to practice in most other states.

If you really want, there are multiple places that offer online "doctorate" degrees. You can get a DN online and become a "doctor" licensed to practice holistic (sp?) medicine for $20. At least that's what my mom's "chiropractor" apparently did (and she still goes to that wannabe-quack).

matta
10-05-05, 06:54 PM
UNC has some distance programs:
#
# Education

On another note, I've never really respected master of education programs. My friend and I started grad school at the same time -- her in master of education and me in a master of science of chemical engineering program. She graduated in 6 months with 2-hrs per day of "class". It took me 2 years of full-time classes and a thesis.

al_bundy
10-05-05, 08:20 PM
5 years.


I read an article on distance learning the other day. According to the article, a Princeton study found that, in general, distance education degrees are considered equal to traditional degrees when they come from an established brick-and-mortar university. Degrees from traditionally online schools, such as University of Phoenix, are considered less prestigious, but have gained substantial ground in the last 5 years.

The exception was MBA programs. MBA programs completed online were looked down upon by nearly all MBA recruiters. The bottom line was that if you want to advance your existing career, an online MBA is a good way to do it. If you want to change fields to go into finance, for instance, an online MBA is a bad idea.

If you want an engineering degree, there are plenty of good online programs, including Georgia Tech, Michigan, University of Illinois, etc. For business schools, there are also several good universities, such as the University of Maryland (UC), Duke, etc. that are online. You can even get a J.D. (law degree) online. These include schools like Taft University, Concord University, etc. Be careful with law, though. Online law schools are usually registered with the state of California and not with the ABA (the ABA directly forbids accredition to online J.D.s, though I believe LLM's are ok). IF you graduate from an ABA accredited law school, you can practice anywhere in the nation, but if you graduate from a non-ABA school, then you can only practice in the states that approved your program (and very few approve online programs to allow you to sit for the bar -- hence why all those online schools are in CA). You can sit for the CA bar and become a CA attorney, but you likely won't be able to practice in most other states.

If you really want, there are multiple places that offer online "doctorate" degrees. You can get a DN online and become a "doctor" licensed to practice holistic (sp?) medicine for $20. At least that's what my mom's "chiropractor" apparently did (and she still goes to that wannabe-quack).


how do you get an engineering degree online? I imagine there are a bunch of labs. I know UoP has an online nursing degree that is accredited, but a requirement is that you have to do an internship at a hospital that has some level of accreditation or something.

I visited a law school forum a while ago and the people there said that with a good LSAT score it's not a problem getting into a good law school with a UoP degree. But an online JD is not worth it since it's useless in most states.

matta
10-05-05, 09:10 PM
how do you get an engineering degree online? I imagine there are a bunch of labs. I know UoP has an online nursing degree that is accredited, but a requirement is that you have to do an internship at a hospital that has some level of accreditation or something.

I visited a law school forum a while ago and the people there said that with a good LSAT score it's not a problem getting into a good law school with a UoP degree. But an online JD is not worth it since it's useless in most states.

There are no labs in graduate engineering school. Some programs allow you to get a non-thesis master's degree where you only take courses. These degrees, however, are not considered equivalent to thesis master's degrees when applying to a doctorate level program (of course, if you want a PhD, why bother with an MS?). Industry treats the two as equals.

I have no direct experience with University of Phoenix graduates and law school, though I imagine that with a good enough LSAT score, a clown college graduate could get into law school.

I can tell you that from a recruiter standpoint I do not see a University of Phoenix degree as equivalent to most other schools. The reason has nothing to do with Phoenix's online programs, though -- it's because Phoneix will accept anyone willing to pay the price. For that reason, in my mind, it is equivalent to a community college or a DeVry.

I would imagine that an online JD is good for someone who wants to build their resume and gain experience in law without directly practicing law. For example: a doctor wanted to gain a better understanding of the legal aspects of medical care but still practice medicine, a small business owner wanted to learn more about corporate law, or a patent agent who wants to improve his chance of a promotion. I doubt you'd get very far in a firm with an online degree, though. You may be able to cut it if you started your own practice, lived in California, and charged next-to-nothing.

NotThatGuy
10-05-05, 09:15 PM
On another note, I've never really respected master of education programs. My friend and I started grad school at the same time -- her in master of education and me in a master of science of chemical engineering program. She graduated in 6 months with 2-hrs per day of "class". It took me 2 years of full-time classes and a thesis.

I know what you mean. MS and MA vary greatly, both amongst themselves, and also MS vs MA.

matta
10-05-05, 09:25 PM
I know what you mean. MS and MA vary greatly, both amongst themselves, and also MS vs MA.

Apparently, school districts pay more for teachers with advanced degrees. Several schools have created diploma mills to "assist" this underpaid group (the fact of why they're not underpaid is another topic all together). Programs give "credit" for "life experience" even if a teacher has never stepped foot in a classroom.

The lack of restrictions placed on BA/MA degrees has always bothered me.

NotThatGuy
10-05-05, 09:29 PM
Admittedly, many teachers have to go for advanced degrees because of the pay scale of the school districts. Teachers starting out who don't get the 'life experience' bumps, and etc....are really in a hole. Personally I think 'most' teachers are underpaid, but I reserve the right to address it case by case. (God knows there are anecdotal examples of every type of teacher out there)

matta
10-05-05, 09:51 PM
Admittedly, many teachers have to go for advanced degrees because of the pay scale of the school districts. Teachers starting out who don't get the 'life experience' bumps, and etc....are really in a hole. Personally I think 'most' teachers are underpaid, but I reserve the right to address it case by case. (God knows there are anecdotal examples of every type of teacher out there)

The pay for teachers should depend on the market demand for their talents. What is a 5th grade english teacher going to do if she can't teach? Probably editing or proofreading. How much is she going to make? About the same as at the school that's "underpaying" her. Of course, the policy of equal pay for teachers does impact this logic: chemistry teachers could probably make more than they're getting as a teacher and PE teachers would get less.

This is the same reason that english professors will often make an order of magnitude less than business professors in college (~$35,000 compared to ~$350,000). The english professors can't really leave and make much, while the business professors have plenty of six-figure opportunities in consulting. The schools pays professors just enough to keep them from leaving.

My teacher friends bitch all the time about being "underpaid". My response is always the same: go find a job somewhere else that pays more for your skill set (of course most of my friends teach home ec, PE, etc)

matta
10-05-05, 09:58 PM
One other on topic comment -- remember to look at the school's accreditation. Look for a regionally accredited program in general (http://www.ed.gov/admins/finaid/accred/accreditation_pg7.html#RegionalInstitutional), or ABET accredited for engineering. When in doubt, track down the website of the accedition board and look at their other accredited schools. If you see major universities on there, it's probably ok, but if you've never seen any other them before, that should be a red flag.

goofee girl
10-09-05, 09:57 AM
On another note, I've never really respected master of education programs. My friend and I started grad school at the same time -- her in master of education and me in a master of science of chemical engineering program. She graduated in 6 months with 2-hrs per day of "class". It took me 2 years of full-time classes and a thesis.
Where was this school? I'd like to get my master's degree in 6 months. It would sure save me time and effort.

goofee girl
10-09-05, 09:59 AM
Don't forget to check out Degree Info (http://www.degreeinfo.com/) for advice from people who seemingly get all their degrees online. They are a wealth of information.

Have you decided upon a school or at least narrowed down your choices? I'd be interested to hear what you've learned.

matta
10-09-05, 10:18 AM
Where was this school? I'd like to get my master's degree in 6 months. It would sure save me time and effort.

Her school was a small local university, but you can try anywhere. American Intercontinential University , for instance, advertises on the radio for a 10-month "accelerated" online M.Ed. program. She signed up for one those those, then got a bunch of "life experience" credits that knocked off a semester.

matta
10-09-05, 10:49 AM
Don't forget to check out Degree Info (http://www.degreeinfo.com/) for advice from people who seemingly get all their degrees online. They are a wealth of information.


Wow, that's a crazy message board. People list their degrees in their signature, and some of them have associates through doctorate degrees from online universities.

How is it even possible to get a research Ph.D. online? For instance, North Central University is advertising a distance-learning Operations Management PhD. Actual PhD students spend all day and all night for two years in class, take the comps, then spend two years all day and all night as PhD candidates writing papers and researching. It just doesn't seem possible online.

goofee girl
10-09-05, 01:04 PM
Wow, that's a crazy message board. People list their degrees in their signature, and some of them have associates through doctorate degrees from online universities.

How is it even possible to get a research Ph.D. online? For instance, North Central University is advertising a distance-learning Operations Management PhD. Actual PhD students spend all day and all night for two years in class, take the comps, then spend two years all day and all night as PhD candidates writing papers and researching. It just doesn't seem possible online.
Those degrees are out there. Spend enough time on that forum and you'll find yourself a program. I would bet that many of those PhD folks had to spend at least a little time on campus. Some only require a week or two every semester for meeting with advisors. Not a bad deal.

matta
10-09-05, 06:03 PM
Those degrees are out there. Spend enough time on that forum and you'll find yourself a program. I would bet that many of those PhD folks had to spend at least a little time on campus. Some only require a week or two every semester for meeting with advisors. Not a bad deal.

I don't see how you can only spend a "week or two" on campus every semester for a Ph.D.

uli2000
10-09-05, 06:17 PM
My brother in law is currently doing his though Northern Arizona University. I dont think it is all online based, though.

Duran
10-09-05, 06:17 PM
See I don't think I'd want to put U of Phoenix on my resume... just doesn't sound legit. Maybe that's just me. Shaq is a graduate.

I would probably want to do either MIS or MBA w/some type of Econ concentration.

If you want to do it online, make sure it's a university with an established physical presence and reputation. When I'm looking at resumes, a graduate degree from University of Phoenix or other online-only universities is ignored.

twikoff
10-09-05, 08:57 PM
Troy University is an option. www.troy.edu They have quite a few distance learning programs and the option to attend courses at their campuses throughout the US and overseas.