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View Full Version : Silent film comedian Harold Lloyd films to be on TCM!


Buford T Pusser
03-29-03, 08:59 PM
I'm sure that most of you have not seen any Harold Lloyd films and many do not really know who he is. He's considered one of the three great silent comedians along with Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton.

This is the image most would know him by. It's from the film, "Safety Last".


http://www.filmforum.com/comedyfilms/images/safetylast.jpg

We even had a mural painted at our home of this:

http://www.theforumisdown.com/uploadfiles/0103/HAROLDintsm.jpg

HAROLD LLOYD Introduction

Of all the jesters, buffoons, clowns and funny men who swept across the silent screen, and there were hundreds of them, only three were considered to tower above the rest: Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd. Hundreds of others were candidates to be included in that august company, but none quite made the grade. Chaplin, Keaton and Lloyd - like The Three Tenors - have always been The Big Three of silent comedy, the yardsticks by which all other silent screen comedians have been judged. Which is fine and dandy except that most of us have had to take that assessment on blind faith. Indeed, we've had the chance, thanks to networks like TCM, revival houses, film societies and the VHS and DVD revolutions, to study the great and masterful work of Chaplin and Keaton - but who among us, except for the most dedicated film buffs with keys to hidden vaults, has had a chance to see an actual movie starring Harold Lloyd? If we know Lloyd at all, it's because of that famous image of him perilously hanging over a busy city street, clutching the hands of a clock. It's a defining moment from his 1923 film Safety Last! and, the experts tell us, it's part of a wonderfully inspired and breath-stopping sequence filmed, for the record, without benefit of special effects, but by the clever use of camera trickery at three different Los Angeles locales.

One reason moviegoers have had so little access to the Lloyd films is due in large part to the man himself. During his lifetime, he alone controlled the rights to his films and, for years, was very strict about their showings; by the time he did make them available for screenings, the public had basically lost interest in his work, preferring to check out newer comedians who had entered the marketplace. Two years following his death in 1971, a number of Harold Lloyd's movies were redistributed, but with two strikes against them: they didn't include the comedian's best work, and they were repackaged with a grating, badly conceived narration added to them, which further limited their appeal. That's why we're particularly excited about our salute to Lloyd as our April Star of the Month. We're going to make it very easy for you to see a virtual cornucopia of Harold Lloyd's films, some two dozen in all, both feature-length and shorts, some of them silent (including that one where he hangs from the clock) and some of them talkies, including the best of his best - such as The Freshman and The Kid Brother (on April 6), The Milky Way and The Cat's Paw (April 13), Safety Last!, Why Worry? and Girl Shy (April 20) and A Sailor-Made Man (April 27). Many of these screenings will be co-hosted by Lloyd's granddaughter Suzanne Lloyd, who recently co-wrote an excellent book on her grandfather with Jeffrey Vance titled Harold Lloyd: Master Comedian. After this, there should be no more arguments about whether or not he deserves that accolade as one of the most watchable, most original comedians of all time. It's a discovery I think you'll thoroughly enjoy making.

by Robert Osborne


http://www.turnerclassicmovies.com/ThisMonth/Article/0,,23980,00.html

For those wanting to know more try www.haroldlloyd.com or their forum http://pub39.ezboard.com/btheharoldlloydcommunity A Yahoo Club also started this week.


http://www.haroldlloyd.com/images/ew1920.jpg

greatjedi
03-29-03, 09:32 PM
Good news! I've been wanting to see some of his films. And the timing is perfect. I just got my satellite hooked back up :)

tor_greg
03-30-03, 05:52 AM
Friday evening I saw Safety Last at the L.A. Country Museum of Art with live musical accompaniment, along with The Eastern Westerner and Grandma's Boy. I had never seen any of his stuff, and I thought it was brilliant.

A friend of mine brought me along, he got free tickets because he knows Lloyd's granddaughter, who I got to meet!

The DVD rights are available for sale, but no one wants to pay the 3 to 4 million dollars she wants for the lot of them (over 120 films). I think it would be a very decent investment.

NavinJohnson
03-30-03, 10:54 AM
Beautiful mural Buford! I'm looking forward to a Harold Lloyd marathon next Sunday.

MrN
03-30-03, 11:44 AM
The only Harold Lloyd film I've seen was a talkie: The sin of Harold Diddlebock, which contained a chunk of The Freshman.

I'm looking forward to the next 4 Sundays of Harold Lloyd.

And then there's those 7 Marx Bros. films this Tuesday...

Groucho
03-30-03, 12:04 PM
But the real question: when will they appear on DVD?

Buford T Pusser
03-30-03, 04:15 PM
Originally posted by tor_greg
Friday evening I saw Safety Last at the L.A. Country Museum of Art with live musical accompaniment, along with The Eastern Westerner and Grandma's Boy. I had never seen any of his stuff, and I thought it was brilliant.

A friend of mine brought me along, he got free tickets because he knows Lloyd's granddaughter, who I got to meet!

The DVD rights are available for sale, but no one wants to pay the 3 to 4 million dollars she wants for the lot of them (over 120 films). I think it would be a very decent investment.

How was his granddaughter? I hear she seems very nice. The photo of her on the latest HL book has her looking very attractive. Is this true in person?

Where did you hear the $3-4 Million figure?

marty888
03-30-03, 06:32 PM
TCM showed a lot of this material about 10 years ago, and I filled abut 5 VHS tapes with Lloyd features and shorts - great stuff, so if you are not familiar with him, do yourself a favor and watch!

Buford T Pusser
03-30-03, 07:16 PM
This time they've changed the music on some and improved the picture in a major way.

They also showed several a few months back.

tor_greg
03-30-03, 07:37 PM
Originally posted by Buford T Pusser
How was his granddaughter? I hear she seems very nice. The photo of her on the latest HL book has her looking very attractive. Is this true in person?

Where did you hear the $3-4 Million figure?

Yes she's attractive for her age, though a bit old for me (I'm 21) ;) She was very nice.
I hear there's a great-granddaughter, who I didn't get a chance to meet.

The DVD rights figure came from the friend I went with, who's an agent for "the industry", so he keeps tabs on this stuff.

devilpants
03-31-03, 02:30 PM
Speedy has some terrific footage of Coney Island in the 1920's, which is amazing on historical value alone. And Babe Ruth is in it, also, playing himself. Wish it was on DVD.

Charlie Goose
03-31-03, 03:43 PM
Originally posted by MrN


And then there's those 7 Marx Bros. films this Tuesday...
Right before the Marx Brothers block, TCM is showing Abbott & Costello Meet Captain Kidd, which is the only A&C movie I've never seen. I'm stoked.

As a comparison, AMC showed Halloween IV and Halloween V yesterday. :rolleyes:
The C in AMC must now stand for Crapola.

http://charliegoose.homestead.com/files/goose.jpg Honk!

Dimension X
03-31-03, 07:15 PM
From TCM's schedule:
6 Sunday

9:00 PM The Freshman (1925) In this silent film, a naive college boy tries to join the football team after making a fool out of himself. Harold Lloyd, Jobyna Ralston, Brooks Benedict. D: Fred C. Newmeyer. BW 76m.

10:15 PM For Heaven's Sake (1926) In this silent film, a millionaire tries to help save souls after he falls for a young mission-worker. Harold Lloyd, Jobyna Ralston, Noah Young. D: Sam Taylor. BW 58m.

11:30 PM The Kid Brother (1927) In this silent film, the weakling in a family of he-men tries to prove his mettle. Harold Lloyd, Jobyna Ralston, Walter James. D: Ted Wilde, J.A. Howe. BW 82m.

12:00 AM Speedy (1928) In this silent film, a young man helps his girlfriend save the family trolley business. Harold Lloyd, Ann Christy, Babe Ruth. D: Ted Wilde. BW 86m.

1:30 AM Harold Lloyd's World of Comedy (1962) Classic clips reveal the genius of the silent screen comic noted for his daredevil stunts. Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, Bebe Daniels. D: Harold Lloyd. BW 97m.

13 Sunday

8:00 PM The Milky Way (1936) A mild-mannered milkman stumbles onto a career in the boxing ring. Harold Lloyd, Adolphe Menjou, Verree Teasdale. D: Leo McCarey. BW 88m.

9:30 PM Welcome Danger (1929) A gentle botany student has to toughen up to replace his father as chief of police. Harold Lloyd, Barbara Kent, Noah Young D: Clyde Bruckman, Malcolm St. Clair. BW 115m.

11:30 PM Feet First (1930) A shoe salesman's involvement with a band of crooks leaves him dangling from the side of a tall building. Harold Lloyd, Robert McWade, Barbara Kent. D: Clyde Bruckman. BW 69m.

1:00 AM Movie Crazy (1932) A stagestruck young actor accidentally receives somebody else's invitation to test in Hollywood. Harold Lloyd, Constance Cummings, Kenneth Thomson. D: Clyde Bruckman. BW 80m.

2:30 AM The Cat's Paw (1934) A missionary's son gets mixed up in a Chinese clan war. Harold Lloyd, George Barbier, Una Merkel. D: Sam Taylor. BW 102m.

20 Sunday

8:00 PM Safety Last! (1923) In this silent film, a small-town boy out to impress his girlfriend scales a skyscraper in the big city. Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, Noah Young. D: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor. BW 73m.

9:30 PM Never Weaken (1921) In this silent film, a young man thwarted in love stumbles through a series of suicide attempts. Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, Roy Brooks. D: Fred C. Newmeyer. BW 29m.

10:00 PM Why Worry? (1923) In this silent film, a rich hypochondriac on vacation in the tropics gets mixed up with revolutionaries. Harold Lloyd, Jobyna Ralston, John Aasen. D: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor. BW 63m.

11:15 PM Girl Shy (1924) In this silent film, a small-town boy raises a ruckus when he writes a book about how to handle women. Harold Lloyd, Jobyna Ralston, Richard Daniels. D: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor. BW 80m.

12:45 AM Hot Water (1924) In this silent film, a newlywed husband has in-law problems. Harold Lloyd, Jobyna Ralston, Josephine Crowell. D: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor. BW 60m.

2:00 AM Now or Never (1921) Harold Lloyd D: Hal Roach BW 36m.

3:15 AM Ask Father (1919) BW 13m.

3:30 AM Billy Blazes, Esq. (1919) Harold Lloyd cleans up the town in this western parody, one of his best one-reel comedies. Harold Lloyd, Bebe Daniels, Noah Young. D: Hal Roach. BW 13m.

3:45 AM Among Those Present (1921) Mildred Davis, Harold Lloyd D: Fred C. Newmeyer BW 35m.

27 Sunday

8:00 PM Harold Lloyd's World of Comedy (1962) Classic clips reveal the genius of the silent screen comic noted for his daredevil stunts. Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, Bebe Daniels. D: Harold Lloyd. BW 97m.

9:30 PM An Eastern Westerner (1920) D: 0m.

10:00 PM From Hand to Mouth (1919) In this silent film, a young burglar tries to save an heiress from kidnappers. Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, Snub Pollard. D: Alfred I. Goulding, Hal Roach. BW 22m.

10:30 PM High and Dizzy (1920) In this silent film, a young man gets drunk by accident then winds up on a narrow ledge high above the street. Harold Lloyd, Wallace Howe, Mildred Davis. D: Hal Roach. BW 26m.

11:00 PM A Sailor-Made Man (1921) In this silent film, a feckless young man joins the Navy to prove himself worthy of the girl he loves. Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, Noah Young. D: Fred C. Newmeyer. BW 47m.

12:00 AM I Do (1921) In this silent film, a clueless married couple has to care for two precocious children for a night. Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, Jackie Morgan. D: Hal Roach. BW 25m.

12:30 AM Grandma's Boy (1922) In this silent film, a young coward thinks a magical charm can make him a hero. Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, Anna Townsend. D: Fred C. Newmeyer. BW 56m.

1:45 AM Dr. Jack (1922) In this silent film, a naive country doctor fights to save the woman he loves from a crooked specialist. Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, John T. Prince. D: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor. BW 60m.

Damfino
04-01-03, 01:33 PM
The schedule at the TCM site is incorrect for this Sunday (April 6)

The Freshman will actually start at 8 PM Eastern and all of the other movies will also start 1 hour earlier. This is documented on the TCM message boards (and in the TCM magazine "Now Playing").

This is an exciting month for silent movie fans! Despite my interest in the silent era I have only seen about half of these movies before.

Dimension X
04-01-03, 02:03 PM
Thanks for pointing that out Damfino.

DST starts this Sunday (reset your clocks).

I think this might be correct (based on running times):

6 Sunday

8:00 PM The Freshman (1925) In this silent film, a naive college boy tries to join the football team after making a fool out of himself. Harold Lloyd, Jobyna Ralston, Brooks Benedict. D: Fred C. Newmeyer. BW 76m.

9:15 PM For Heaven's Sake (1926) In this silent film, a millionaire tries to help save souls after he falls for a young mission-worker. Harold Lloyd, Jobyna Ralston, Noah Young. D: Sam Taylor. BW 58m.

10:30 PM The Kid Brother (1927) In this silent film, the weakling in a family of he-men tries to prove his mettle. Harold Lloyd, Jobyna Ralston, Walter James. D: Ted Wilde, J.A. Howe. BW 82m.

12:00 AM Speedy (1928) In this silent film, a young man helps his girlfriend save the family trolley business. Harold Lloyd, Ann Christy, Babe Ruth. D: Ted Wilde. BW 86m.

1:30 AM Harold Lloyd's World of Comedy (1962) Classic clips reveal the genius of the silent screen comic noted for his daredevil stunts. Harold Lloyd, Mildred Davis, Bebe Daniels. D: Harold Lloyd. BW 97m.

Drexl
04-01-03, 10:04 PM
Sorry if this is common knowledge and sort of off-topic anyway, but the thread above this one made me wonder:

Was Harold Lloyd the inspiration for Harry and Lloyd of Dumb and Dumber?

Holly E. Ordway
04-02-03, 08:18 AM
There's actually one Harold Lloyd film out on DVD - it's "Number, Please," and it's included on The Cook and Other Treasures (check out the review: http://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/read.php?ID=5602). I had heard of Harold Lloyd, but this was the first I'd seen of him, and I was impressed! Now I want to see more of him on DVD! :)

Buford T Pusser
04-02-03, 01:55 PM
Originally posted by ordway
There's actually one Harold Lloyd film out on DVD - it's "Number, Please," and it's included on The Cook and Other Treasures (check out the review: http://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/read.php?ID=5602). I had heard of Harold Lloyd, but this was the first I'd seen of him, and I was impressed! Now I want to see more of him on DVD! :)

I don't have that disc yet. Thanks for the reminder. BTW, that's a short film, not a feature.

There are a few other shorts on DVD.

"The Cat and the Canary" from 1927 has Harold's "Haunted Spooks" from 1920 on the disc.

Also the "Slapstick Encyclopedia" box set has "Haunted Spooks" and "Get Out and Get Under".

Here's what a review says about these:

Volume 6's main star is Harold Lloyd, who stars in two shorts, "Get Out and Get Under" and "Haunted Spooks." Around the time that he made "Get Out and Get Under" (1920), Lloyd was beginning to perfect his American go-getter character. Here, his character is so absorbed in his own actions that he can't see how he's affecting others. When he accidentally runs his car through the wall of a garage and into his neighbor's garden, he looks at the car and says, "Didn't do a bit of damage!"--oblivious to the fact that the neighbor's garden has been devastated. Lloyd also supplies several good sight gags, as when his car breaks down and he literally crawls inside the hood while fixing it.

"Haunted Spooks" (1920) is the production where Lloyd became injured by a prop bomb that exploded, causing him to loose his thumb and forefinger (and making his subsequent acrobatics in movies such as Safety Last (1923) all the more remarkable. "Haunted Spooks" is a somewhat generic haunted house comedy that fails to take advantage of Lloyd's unique abilities, but it features at least one good sight gag: when Lloyd sees a ghost, his hair stands on end thanks to an apparent application of static electricity (making him look remarkably like the lead character in David Lynch's Eraserhead).



Here's the review of the entire box set:

http://www.imagesjournal.com/2002/reviews/slapstick/intro.htm


Apparently the (not so great sound feature) "the Sin of Harold Diddlebock" has been seen at Value City in the $5 bin.

Buford T Pusser
04-02-03, 02:01 PM
Originally posted by Drexl
Sorry if this is common knowledge and sort of off-topic anyway, but the thread above this one made me wonder:

Was Harold Lloyd the inspiration for Harry and Lloyd of Dumb and Dumber?

I wouldn't say the characters were, but the names may have been paying tribute.

Adam Sandler and "The Waterboy" was basically an update of Harold's "The Freshman".

Buford T Pusser
04-02-03, 02:05 PM
I believe Damfino is correct on the schedule.

As soon as I hear something definitive on the schedule I'll post it here. There still seems to be a dispute that the TCM website is incorrect as far as times and lengths of the films.

Buford T Pusser
04-05-03, 05:25 PM
The movies will definitely start at 8 p.m. Eastern on Sunday-just over 24 hours away.

Giles
04-07-03, 09:29 AM
Watched "The Kid Brother" and "Speedy" last night, got to say I really enjoyed the latter, a tad bit more than "Kid". Gonna watch the other films I taped later today.

Buford T Pusser
04-08-03, 11:44 PM
I taped them but have only seen bits and pieces. The mother-in-law is here and wants to watch CNN all the time, not old silent films from before she was born. They were made about a year or two before her birth. -ohbfrank-

Here's an article from the Washington Times.

Harold Lloyd: A silent scream
By Gary Arnold
THE WASHINGTON TIMES


Harold Lloyd is usually conceded third place in the conventional ranking of silent film comedians behind Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. The film historian Kevin Brownlow, for example, chose the title "The Third Genius" for his 1989 documentary feature about Mr. Lloyd, now the subect of a richly entertaining and historically valuable retrospective that will be telecast on Turner Classic Movies every Sunday evening in April. Top Stories
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So settled is his place in the comic dominance hierarchy that it may come as a shock to learn that throughout the 1920s, Mr. Lloyd was actually a bigger draw than either of his more famous (at least to us) rivals.
Unlike Mr. Chaplin and Mr. Keaton, who were both comic naturals, Mr. Lloyd "had no gift from the gods," as critic Walter Kerr put it in his indispensable appreciation of their era, "The Silent Clowns."
"For his kind of comedy, it was best not to be too accomplished, best for triumph not to come easily," Mr. Kerr wrote. "Given his transparent normality, he would have to emphasize not the ease but the difficulty he encountered in managing any situation at all."
Mr. Lloyd took longer to hone his skills and settle on a reliable comic identity, but he kept plugging away and refining, even after the public had been won over by a trademark character called Lonesome Luke. An answer to Mr. Chaplin's pensive tramp in baggy clothes, Luke was a leering goof in outfits several sizes too small. There are books that illustrate the contrast side-by-side. Harold Lloyd all Luked up is quite a fright.
In time, Mr. Lloyd surmised that a set of horn-rimmed glasses, which had impressed him in a melodrama about a fighting parson, held the key to a more winning screen identity. It was a great hunch. He tested the hypothesis by alternating Luke shorts and "glasses" shorts in 1917. Eventually, the new look merged with an impressive aptitude for slapstick, especially when risking his neck in daredevil climbing and chase sequences, a field of specialization that commenced in 1919 with "Look Out Below."
The most famous of the skyscraper climbing spectacles, "Safety Last" (1923), kicks off the Lloyd bill comprising 16 silent features, five silent shorts, five talkies and a career anthology on April 20, also the 110th anniversary of the comedian's birth. One of the most perfect film comedies, "Safety Last" is the source of the immortal stills that find Harold Lloyd clinging to the hands of a clock that threatens to come unmoored from an upper story facade somewhere in downtown Los Angeles.
By the time of these characteristic exertions, Mr. Lloyd had also secured an audience-friendly image that endured for the rest of the decade and even into the talkie period: a bespectacled young man, essentially decent though sometimes impulsive and foolish, who has somehow been manuevered into ledge-hanging or otherwise death-defying situations.
Often overlooked is the fact that Mr. Lloyd accumulated far more box office admissions during the 1920s than the more prestigious Chaplin. There is a catch: Mr. Chaplin the perfectionist released only two features, "The Gold Rush" and "The Circus," during the middle and late years of the decade. Mr. Lloyd had 11 pictures to his credit, and Mr. Keaton was just as prolific, but as Mr. Kerr ruefully observed, "Lloyd always outdrew Keaton."
One's respect for Mr. Lloyd, who died in 1972, only grows on learning that he needed to overcome a grievous physical handicap to sustain his career after a publicity stunt literally blew up in his face in 1919. A gag bomb presumed to be a dud turned out to be armed with a live fuse. The explosion left Mr. Lloyd temporarily blind and cost him his right thumb and the top joint of his right index finger. He was able to resume work after his sight returned. The mutilation of his hand was concealed by a rubber glove, clearly discernible from time to time, also covering prosthetic digits. You tend to be more conscious of it when the star places himself in a boxing ring or on a window ledge, poised to throw a punch or obliged to cling for apparent dear life with that damaged right hand.
Mr. Lloyd was four years younger than Mr. Chaplin and two years older than Mr. Keaton. The first of the three to appear in a movie, Mr. Lloyd had found work as an extra in 1912. The legitimate stage had been his aim until he blundered into the movies. He was in and out of Mack Sennett's troupe of madcaps before a friendship with Hal Roach, a former extra who got enough capital together to start his own comedy studio, began to separate Mr. Lloyd from the pack.
Mr. Chaplin, who started a year later and was directing his own comedy shorts within a year, established a magnetic comic identity in the years before World War I. He expanded the emotional range of screen comedy, advancing his gallant little tramp character from merely mischievous to deeply moving and even admirable.
The deadpan Mr. Keaton, a vaudeville acrobat from early childhood until his father retired their legendary roughhouse act in 1917, caught on after a year or so of playing second banana for Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle in slapstick shorts. An image of stoic resourcefulness in his own vehicles, Mr. Keaton also possessed the most far-reaching intuitive sense of the sheer pictorial strangeness, richness and flexibility of movie imagery. By 1924 he had already created a brilliant and delightful textbook in "Sherlock, Jr."
TCM's Lloyd retrospective does not follow a strict chronology. The first bill showcases the performer at his most accomplished, during the mid-to-late 1920s. It begins with one of his sturdiest vehicles, "The Freshman," a model for many a sports farce, from the Marx Brothers' "Horsefeathers" to Adam Sandler's "The Waterboy." Harold Lamb (he was always a Harold in this period) has saved up to attend his beloved Tate College and enters with fond hopes of immediately endearing himself. He has rehearsed greeting gestures: a little dance step he has seen in a movie, along with the invitation to shake his hand and call him "Speedy."
A few years later Mr. Lloyd shot a memorable feature titled "Speedy," which will be revived at midnight tomorrow. A landmark in several respects, it was the last of his silent features. He completed another, "Welcome Danger," but immediately reshot it as a talkie, released in 1929. The program a week from Sunday will revive the surviving "Danger," along with four of the comedies Lloyd made between 1930 and 1936. The best of this group are Leo McCarey's "The Milky Way" and a Hollywood spoof called "Movie Crazy." The series backtracks to the early 1920s and the late teens in its concluding installments. It might be helpful to arm yourself with "The Silent Clowns" or a Lloyd biography in advance in order to compensate for TCM's zigzagging.
"Speedy" took the Lloyd company to New York City. The locations provide some remarkable backdrops, like Coney Island, the site of an extensive sequence that closes when Harold and sweetheart Ann Christy return in the back of a friend's moving van, arranging the furniture in ways that anticipate a cozy domesticity of their own. Babe Ruth turns up, in his prime, capping a superbly sustained sequence about Harold during his first day on the job as a cab driver. One obstacle after another prevents him from securing a fare until, incredibly, there's the Babe, in need of a fast ride uptown to Yankee Stadium. A frequent Lloyd device distinguishes this journey: the driver keeps ignoring the road while chatting with his celebrated passenger, causing the passenger to freak.
The weak tendencies in the Lloyd apparatus are evident in the duplication of donnybrooks at the end of "Speedy." The first one even seems to lose track of Lloyd as a central player. There are absent-minded lapses with the romantic comedy plots as well from time to time. "Girl Shy," for example, begins with a delightful courtship on a train between Lloyd and Jobyna Ralston, his principal leading lady of the late 1920s. (He married Mildred Davis, her predecessor, in 1923.) But after a second encounter follows up nicely, Miss Ralston seems thereafter to be stranded in some other movie until the whirlwind finale.
A reliable grace note of the mature Lloyd features is the snappy inter-title. A country estate in "Girl Shy" is summarized as follows: "So large that 30 servants could be doing nothing all day without being caught at it." Even better, "The Freshman" begins with this scene-setter: "Tate College, a large football stadium with a college attached."
Give these Harold Lloyd silents a chance over the next four Sundays, and you are liable to find yourself glued to a television set with your domicile attached.

WHAT: Harold Lloyd retrospective
WHERE: Turner Classic Movies cable channel
WHEN: Sunday evenings in April


http://washingtontimes.com/arts/20030405-87154813.htm

Buford T Pusser
04-13-03, 01:58 AM
In a few hours will be week two of Harold's movies on TCM starting at 8 p.m. EDT. This week are the talkie films.

The Milky Way

Welcome Danger

Feet First

Movie Crazy

Cat's Paw

Buford T Pusser
04-20-03, 11:29 PM
Meant to bump this before tonight's shows in case anyone cares.

Safety Last!

Never Weaken

Why Worry?

Girl Shy

Hot Water

Now or Never

Ask Father

Billy Blazes, Esq.

Among Those Present

SunMonkey
04-21-03, 12:48 AM
Hey, did anyone catch Harold Zoid, the old uncle of Dr. Zoidberg and once famous silent holo-film star, on Futurama?


http://members.aol.com/splatterjunkie/Zoid.jpg

Edit: uploaded the image to my space since the original site doesn't like linking.

Buford T Pusser
04-21-03, 12:58 AM
Originally posted by SunMonkey
Hey, did anyone catch Harold Zoid, the old uncle of Dr. Zoidberg and once famous silent holo-film star, on Futurama?


http://www.gotfuturama.com/Multimedia/FrameGrabs/3ACV08/Grabs/pic00086.jpg

when was that?

SunMonkey
04-21-03, 12:15 PM
Originally posted by Buford T Pusser
when was that?

The episode originally aired during the third season on 02/25/01. It is episode 40 (S03E08), called "That's Lobstertainment!"

You can catch it again on May 25th, on Cartoon Network, at 11:30 pm EST/PST, 10:30 PM CST, 9:30 PM MST. It's not that great of an episode, though.

Buford T Pusser
04-26-03, 11:08 AM
last bump-fourth week of films on TCM Sunday night.

April 27th ... TCM picks up with

Harold Lloyd World of Comedy-good overview w/clips from several films

Eastern Westerner

From Hand to Mouth

High and Dizzy

Sailor Made Man

I Do

Grandma's Boy

Doctor Jack

Starts at 8 p.m. Eastern

Giles
04-26-03, 05:34 PM
man, I've got a backlog of these films I need to watch, taped them off of TCM for the last two weekends but haven't had the chance to sit down and enjoy them... (someday)