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View Full Version : Recommend a great fantasy book series to me


Shamu
07-23-01, 04:51 AM
Hi all,

I want to start reading a great epic fantasy novel series while I pass some time during this boring summer of mine. I'll be really glad if someone could give me a good suggestion.

My tastes:

1. Wheel of Time - OK, I really like this series, but the last few books have been kind of lacking. But still, I love this series.

2. Song of Fire and Ice - Best book series ever. I'm afraid that this series has ruined the entire fantasy genre for me...in fact, I'm afraid that it may have ruined all books for me. I try to read other fantasy books and I'm like "This doesn't even compare to Martin's work"...

So is there any great fantasy series that can hold up to these 2 greats? I did a search, but only came up with a couple of threads about fantasy books...I bought a couple of books from those suggestions, but I just didnt' enjoy reading the book that I got.

Thanks! Please save me from this horrible boredom...one can only watch so many DVDs!

Shamu
07-23-01, 05:16 AM
Anyone have anything to say about Steven Erikson's Gardens of the Moon? I've read up a little and a lot of people seem to recommend this, especially to fans of Martin's work.

Wow, I can't even find this book in stock online at any online store...anyone also know where it's currently in stock?

grunter
07-23-01, 11:06 AM
While it's not a fantasy series, it is - bar none - THE BEST FANTASY NOVEL I've ever read.

Go and find John Crowley's "Little, Big." Some of the best writing in any genre - period.

Aghama
07-23-01, 04:20 PM
I haven't read the latest WOT novel, but there has to be more action in it than the previous one.

Check out Raymond E. Feist's Riftwar (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0553564943/ref=sim_books/104-5275625-9235956) books, along with the Death Gate Cycle (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0553286390/ref=sim_books/104-5275625-9235956) by Weis & Hickman

Crizzar
07-23-01, 04:31 PM
Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb

Assassin's Apprentice: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/055357339X/qid=995923660/sr=2-1/102-5214271-0573724

Royal Assassin: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0553573411/qid=995923660/sr=2-2/102-5214271-0573724

Assassin's Quest: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0553565699/qid=995923660/sr=2-3/102-5214271-0573724

I LOVE this series

Alvis
07-23-01, 06:15 PM
The original Dragonlance Chronicles and Legends.

paratize
07-23-01, 08:39 PM
Hmm...why not try the greatest book(s) ever written: <b>THE LORD OF THE RINGS</b> !

p1forest
07-23-01, 10:21 PM
Originally posted by Shamu
2. Song of Fire and Ice - Best book series ever. I'm afraid that this series has ruined the entire fantasy genre for me...in fact, I'm afraid that it may have ruined all books for me. I try to read other fantasy books and I'm like "This doesn't even compare to Martin's work"...

I have used almost these exact words in this forum before! :D

I agree, it's kind of ruined other series for me, but I've finally been able to stop comparing books to Martin's series.

I'd second the recommendations of Feist's Riftwar series, and Hobb's Farseer trilogy mentioned above.

You might like the Runelords series by David Farland. I also have liked the Black Company series by Glen Cook.

Linoge
07-23-01, 10:32 PM
Anything by R.A. Salvatore is pretty good. He's written a lot of Forgotten Realms books, but has also done a lot of outside books too. I highly recommend trying The Woods Out Back and it's 2 sequels.

Juri
07-24-01, 12:22 AM
Check out the Terry Goodkind books. Wizard's First Rule is the first. It's a very good read, and despite its size, a fast one. I actually adored it. He is, I have to say, one damn fine storyteller. The writing is not flowery or prosaic all the time, however. Still, it wasn't bad at all. In some ways, that made it all the more enjoyable.

Jordan is ok...but I can't stand drawing things out past a certain point. He hit on it a while ago for me. ;)

Less "high" fantasy and also enjoyable are the Black Company Glen Cook novels, which you won't regret reading. I also like the Recluse series by L.E. Modisett, but he has a really bizarre style of writing that can be hard to muddle through sometimes. Still, the first books were good.

The Death Gate Cycle was great. The last book annoyed me when I read it...perhaps I need to just go through it again. Much of the Dragonlance stuff I feel was not up to the par of the first or second trilogy by W&H.

If you want some great fantasy short stories, the Sword & Sorceress #2 anthology is the best, by far. Unfortunately only available in used stores now.

Shamu
07-24-01, 01:37 AM
Thanks for the replies guys. I guess I'll try out the Riftwar Trilogy b/c I know someone that has the first book.

I was really looking for something that has more than 3 volumes and over 750 pages each, but I guess there's not much out there like that besdies WoT and as someone mentioned Deathgate Cycle, both of which I've read.


But does anyone know anything about Steven Erikson's Gardens of the Moon? I've went to about 3 b&m bookstores and about 4 online stores and everywhere I go it's out of stock or on special order. I really wanted to read this because a bunch of George R. R. Martin fans recommended it to me.

Aghama
07-24-01, 11:36 AM
Originally posted by Shamu

I was really looking for something that has more than 3 volumes and over 750 pages each, but I guess there's not much out there like that besdies WoT and as someone mentioned Deathgate Cycle, both of which I've read.Well, there's the Riftwar trilogy, then two more books in the Riftworld, then the 4 part Serpent War saga, plus another trilogy that ties into the Riftwar and a trilogy that's based off the Krondor computer games. So there's plenty in that world to keep you busy, I'd think. :)

p1forest
07-24-01, 12:00 PM
Originally posted by Juri
Check out the Terry Goodkind books. Wizard's First Rule is the first. It's a very good read, and despite its size, a fast one. I actually adored it. He is, I have to say, one damn fine storyteller. The writing is not flowery or prosaic all the time, however. Still, it wasn't bad at all. In some ways, that made it all the more enjoyable.

Less "high" fantasy and also enjoyable are the Black Company Glen Cook novels, which you won't regret reading. I also like the Recluse series by L.E. Modisett, but he has a really bizarre style of writing that can be hard to muddle through sometimes. Still, the first books were good.

I can't believe I forgot to mention Goodkind and Modesitt above. I was kind of in a rush, but these two are also ones I would highly recommend. Nice to see another Black Company fan, too.

FYI, Modesitt's Recluce books (a dozen or so?) are related loosely to eachother. Only a few of them have the same characters. The books are written about various times through out the history of the world, and it's interesting seeing the development of his 'magic' and technology over the history of the series, as well as the...origin...of all that, which is unfortunately not explained until the 4th or 5th book (although you get the idea from hints throughout the series). Btw, he stole the idea of the origin of Angels and Demons from me. ;)

Shamu
07-24-01, 01:33 PM
OK, well I also bought the first book from Terry Goodkind's A Sword of Truth series. It's pretty thick and there seem to be a lot of them, so hopefully this should keep me a little busy until Martin or Jordan finish their next book.

But I've read a little about this book (Wizard's First Rule) and I'm already feeling that I might not like it...maybe I just don't like magic in my fantasy readings :eek:

I kind of liked how Martin's series didn't have a lot of magic in part of the world...it was more about knights and lords than magic and wizards.

p1forest
07-24-01, 10:54 PM
Originally posted by Shamu
But I've read a little about this book (Wizard's First Rule) and I'm already feeling that I might not like it...maybe I just don't like magic in my fantasy readings :eek:

I kind of liked how Martin's series didn't have a lot of magic in part of the world...it was more about knights and lords than magic and wizards.

If you don't like much magic in your books, then of the ones mentioned above, probably you might want to check out the Modesitt Recluce series. While magic is pervasive throughout the series, it's more of a background/lowkey theme imo, while relationship, political, historical, and other issues are more in the foreground. I don't remember too much magic in Feist's books either, but it's been a while since I've read one.

Oh, btw, expect magic to become more and more present in future Martin books. He's made repeated references to magic returning to the world and becoming more powerful, relating to the presence of dragons in the world again.

Shamu
07-24-01, 10:57 PM
Originally posted by p1forest

Oh, btw, expect magic to become more and more present in future Martin books. He's made repeated references to magic returning to the world and becoming more powerful, relating to the presence of dragons in the world again.

Yeah I know that magic is going to return to the Westeros or whatever, but I'm not completely opposed to magic. As long as the magic isn't ridiculous I'll be fine...hell, if the magic is ridiculous, I'm sure Martin will still manage to make the book great.

tor_greg
07-25-01, 12:09 AM
Michael Moorcock's Elric books kick all ass.

This albino prince, Elric, gets de-throned by his brother (or something, I forget the relation). Instead of a patron-saint, Elric has a patron demon. He has a demon sword that whispers to him and demands blood constantly, so Elric has to kill innocent people every now and then just to keep the sword happy. Oh, did I mention there's incest?

Shamu
07-25-01, 01:51 AM
Originally posted by tor_greg
Michael Moorcock's Elric books kick all ass.

This albino prince, Elric, gets de-throned by his brother (or something, I forget the relation). Instead of a patron-saint, Elric has a patron demon. He has a demon sword that whispers to him and demands blood constantly, so Elric has to kill innocent people every now and then just to keep the sword happy. Oh, did I mention there's incest?

Sounds pretty interesting from some reviews I read about it....about how long is each book?

Wormwood
07-25-01, 09:56 AM
*cough**cough*Harry Potter*cough*. The books are very well written.

Feneant
07-25-01, 03:01 PM
David Farland's The Runelord is a pretty good serie, although it only has 3 books and they are sorta small... but still a good read. I also read all of David Eddings work... many people don't like him and the books are short, but there 19 of them divided in 2*5 series which follow each other, 2 books to continue that serie, 2*3 series which also follow each other and he also has a standalone book which is pretty much no good.

Sn0
07-25-01, 07:04 PM
I like the Covenant the Unbeliever Series by Douglas. They are along the same stark vein of Martins stuff. But your right you are ruined after you read Martin at least I know I am. You can also try Neil Gaiman his stuff while not "High Fantasy' is pretty well written and imaginative

Pmartyn
07-26-01, 06:45 AM
Sounds pretty interesting from some reviews I read about it....about how long is each book?

Theres 7/8 of the Elric books - each one averages about 200 pages. However, Moorcock's fantasy books, for the most part, occur a mulitideminsional Universe - The Multiverse. Try his 'Hawkmoon stuff' as well. You should be able to pick up some compendium volumes. Enjoy.

tor_greg
07-27-01, 12:53 AM
Concerning Elric:

Moorcock has been writing these books since the '60s (he was a member of the Blue Oyster Cult, BTW). The Elric book were originally released individually, and they're pretty short. HOWEVER, White Wolf Publishing puts out editions containing 3 or 4 of the stories in one book. One is called Song of the Black Sword, the other is Stealer of Souls. Each of those contains more than one Elric novel. There's another individual story that JUST came out, I think it's called Daughter of the Rose, or something like that.

JasonF
07-30-01, 06:33 PM
I'll second the recomendation for Glen Cook's Black Company series -- if you liked the gritty, bloody parts of A Song of Ice and Fire, you'll probably like Cook's work, too.

Another series I enjoyed was Memory, Sorrow and Thorn by Tad Williams. It's a dense read (sort of the antithesis of Terry Goodkind), but worthwhile.

It's very magical and not very traditional fantasy, but Roger Zelazny's Chronicles of Amber are great.

Finally, since you like Wheel of Time and Song of Ice and Fire, I'd recommend that you read the Legends anthology. That's a collection of short stories in the settings of various pre-existing series, and includes a Jordan Wheel of Time story and a Martin Song of Ice and Fire story. It's got a bunch of other stuff, too, like a Tad Williams Memory, Sorrow and Thorn story (word of warning -- I hated the short story but loved the actual trilogy), a Goodkind Wizard's First Rule story, an Orson Scott Card Alvin Maker story (another great series), a Stephen King Dark Tower story, an Ursula K. LeGuin Earthsea story, an Anne McCaffery Pern story, and four or five others I'm forgetting.

stingo
07-31-01, 09:22 AM
Stephen Donaldson's series of books (can't remember the name but it has Lord Foul's Bane), Terry Brooks' Sword of Shannara series, Piers Anthony's Xanth series, Fritz Lieber's Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser collection of short stories/"novels" - is all I can think of for now...

And of course as soon as I posted this message I thought of The Once and Future King by T. H. White. While not exactly a series (there is also a kind of addendum called The Book of Merlin) it's an excellent take on the Arthurian legend.

Jeraden
08-06-01, 12:37 PM
Originally posted by Shamu


Sounds pretty interesting from some reviews I read about it....about how long is each book?

While that Elric series has a few merits in its favor, I don't really recommend it based on you liking Jordan/Martin. Those 2 emphasize detail, backgrounds, and completely involving you in the characters. The Elric series is the exact opposite. It's blunt and to the point, using short but effective sentences. Personally I didn't care at all for the writing style. The books are short, mainly because its all plot and no character/background building. If you like that stuff then its good - you don't get bogged down with fluffy details and get right to the heart of the story. But I think its way too abbreviated and seems more like you are reading a movie instead of a book. This is all based just on the first book of the series, as after reading that one I had no real desire to continue on with it.

benedict
08-06-01, 12:57 PM
Originally posted by stingo [....]Piers Anthony's Xanth series [....]Nooooooooooo!

I am sure Mr A. <i>has</i> written a good book in his time but IMNSHO the XANTH series is an abomination. I admit that I don't much care for most of the humorous fantasy that I have encountered finding it too "forced"; Jack Vance's DYING EARTH quartet was a rare exception and was certainly far more <i>intelligent</i> than PA's material.

<A HREF="http://www.sfsite.com/isfdb-bin/exact_author.cgi?Gene_Wolfe" target="_blank">Gene Wolfe</a>'s Science Fantasy series Book of the New Sun and Book of the Long/New Sun are well worth the effort.

Also, definitely check out <b>grunter</b>'s Crowley recommendation.

smokedragon
08-06-01, 03:25 PM
Originally posted by Shamu
Anyone have anything to say about Steven Erikson's Gardens of the Moon? I've read up a little and a lot of people seem to recommend this, especially to fans of Martin's work.

Wow, I can't even find this book in stock online at any online store...anyone also know where it's currently in stock? <br><br> The only place I have found it in stock is Amazon.co.uk. <br> I'm very interested to see if anyone has read Gardens Of The Moon.<br> Sounds interesting. <br> Would order it, but I have all these friggin' DVD's preordered :) <br> So, has anyone read it?<br> Sorry for hijacking your thread, Shamu. But, thanks to you, and all the responses it looks like I have a lot more books to look for and read.

Draven
08-10-01, 10:06 AM
Stick with Goodkind. He has some really interesting ideas about magic in the Sword of Truth series.


I second R.A. Salvatore. His books are usually quick reads, but they are exciting and interesting, so definitely worth a glance.

sexymama
08-12-01, 03:16 AM
Shamu, I'm like you -- I loved Jordan's books when he first started but the last couple have been piss-poor in my opinion. I loved Martin and am on pins and needles until the next one comes out!!!

Anyway, I know you said you like less magic in your preferred readings but I thought you might like to give David Eddings a try. For some reason, I love the first series and have read it several times. I just love the characters and they always make me laugh and amuse me without fail...

smokedragon
08-12-01, 05:08 AM
Well, I found a used copy online of Gardens Of The Moon. Should get it by next week.<br> I'll let you know if it's any good.<br><br> The Glen Cook novels of The Black Company sound good. Sci-Fi book club has an omnibus edition of the first three books.Gonna order it.

Alvis
08-13-01, 05:33 PM
I found Tad Williamses Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn series to be very good.

Yrth
08-20-01, 04:42 PM
In previous threads, I have slammed on the Eddings books. Don't like them at all. I once tried to read them but the female characters and the weak male characters annoyed me. I guess I just didn't care much for the dialogue.

Someone mentioned Vance's Dying Earth stuff. Four books???? I only recall: "The Dying Earth" and "Cugels' Saga." If I remember correctly, both have Cugel as the rogue who falls into and gets out of problems all the time. What other two books? "Eyes of the Overworld"? Is that a Dying Earth book? But with different characters, just short stories? BTW, his Lyonesse series is pretty good IMO..."Suldrun's Garden," "The Green Pearl," and "Madouc" although I believe the latter left me unimpressed.

I like the Black Company. But I do have issues with it. Primarily, the magic system is very loose, open to all kinds of stuff being made up. Second, those wizards, the Taken, never seem to die....I mean, come on, they should all have died but then at least half of them pop up in the latter books with different names. And sometimes his writing in this series is very reminiscent of hard-boiled detective types. I mean, that works well in his Garrett series, but I sometimes get tired of it in his Black Co. books. However, his series that I liked was the Dread Empire series. I don't think he ever finished it off and I've heard he never will.

kdog248
08-20-01, 07:12 PM
David Eddings' "The Belgariad"...five good books...also his "Mallorean"...five books that continue the story started in The Belgariad....I'm reading WOT, and Jordan should take some notes of how to make a series a good length.

JANK
08-20-01, 08:17 PM
Seek out the Book of the New Sun series and The Many Colored Land series. Up there with Dune and LOTR. Beyond compare - if you want more details as in reviews email me at jjankie@yahoo.com

Yrth
08-21-01, 09:45 AM
Originally posted by JANK
Seek out the Book of the New Sun series and The Many Colored Land series. Up there with Dune and LOTR. Beyond compare - if you want more details as in reviews email me at jjankie@yahoo.com

But both of these are sci-fi series. Not that I knock them. I thought the Many Colored Land series was very very good. I didn't care for the prequels too much although they were OK.

JANK
08-21-01, 10:34 AM
Both the Wolfe and May series have enough elements to qualify as fantasy too. Their angle is that the science is so lost in antiquity that it is now magic. I prefer that.

Hemulen
08-21-01, 08:46 PM
Originally posted by kdog248
David Eddings' "The Belgariad"...five good books...also his "Mallorean"...five books that continue the story started in The Belgariad....I'm reading WOT, and Jordan should take some notes of how to make a series a good length.

Myself I wouldn't recommend David Eddings books. Although I suppose if you're into fantasy books then they are typical examples of the genre.

My main complaint is that he is very repetitive - he has stock standard characters and plot lines that he recycles from one story to the next. To make matters worse his works become evermore clumsily written as the series progress.

(although this criticism is by no means limited to Eddings, but could be applied to large parts of the Fantasy genre, which seems to cater to a relatively undemanding audience. IMHO of course)

Hemulen

(and, as has been said before, LOTR and the Hobbit are pretty much the best there is, unless you're willing to read the likes of Beowulf.)

Kal-El
08-22-01, 12:50 PM
When it comes to Fantasy, anything by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, most notably the entire Dragonlance Saga which is up to 9 books right now. Harry Potter would be up there too. I got bored by LOTR so I can't recommend it.

saltheart
08-25-01, 05:38 PM
As a few have posted previously, I highly recommend Stephen Donaldson's Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever, especially the first trilogy (Lord Foul's Bane, The Illearth War, and The Power That Preserves). I actually read through all the Covenant books (two trilogies worth) before I ever finished reading the Tolkien Fellowship trilogy (heresy, I know!), and while I now look upon the Donaldson series as owing a big debt to Tolkien, even more so than the usual fantasy series, given the numerous plot parallels, etc., I still prefer the Covenant trilogy, because the characters are more fully fleshed out to me -- by the end of the third book, I really cared about the fates of many of the characters, which I couldn't really say was true of many of Tolkien's characters. [flame suit on....:)]

Way back when, I used to have a serious Piers Anthony habit (back when the Xanth series was only 5-6 books long....). Even then, I knew that the vast majority of the stuff he wrote was pure fluff and drivel, with the exception of the first 3 or 4 Xanth books, parts of the Apprentice Adept series (Split Infinity, Blue Adept, and Juxtaposition) and maybe one or two of his Incarnations of Immortality series (e.g. On A Pale Horse). Otherwise, he's a total hack.

smokedragon
08-29-01, 12:54 AM
Finally received Steven Erikson's Gardens Of The Moon today. I'll be bringing it to work with me since I have to work a double shift.<br> I'm going to try, try, try not to compare him to George R.R.Martin.<br><br> But, it's going to be difficult.<br><br> I'll let you know what I think when I finish it.<br><br> Also have Deadhouse Gates on the way as well.

Blade
08-30-01, 02:03 AM
Another author I greatly enjoy is Steven Brust. He's done a series of fantasy books based on an assassin that I really like.

I just wish he would write faster!

Also, in the same fantasy world is the Khaavren adventure stories, written in the style of Alexander Dumas. Very funny!

-David

TexasGuy
08-30-01, 10:42 PM
Originally posted by Shamu
OK, well I also bought the first book from Terry Goodkind's A Sword of Truth series. It's pretty thick and there seem to be a lot of them, so hopefully this should keep me a little busy until Martin or Jordan finish their next book.

But I've read a little about this book (Wizard's First Rule) and I'm already feeling that I might not like it...maybe I just don't like magic in my fantasy readings :eek:

I kind of liked how Martin's series didn't have a lot of magic in part of the world...it was more about knights and lords than magic and wizards.

You sound like me. I bought the entire Goodkind series before reading any of them, based on recommendations. After reading Wizard's First Rule, I thought I made a mistake because I didn't really care for it. However, I'm glad I decided to continue reading the series, because it seems to really get better with each book. Better character development, better plot twists, etc.

Given your preference for more realistic knights and lords stories, try the Camalud Chronicles series by Jack Whyte. It's a retelling of the Arthur legend in a realistic sense (no magic). Its now into its seventh book of the series, and has a pretty loyal following. I'll warn you though, it has a LOT of detail (descriptions of scenery, detailed explanations why certain formations are used in battle, etc.), so you may not like it if you prefer a fast read.

benedict
01-23-05, 06:07 PM
As a few have posted previously, I highly recommend Stephen Donaldson's Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever, especially the first trilogy (Lord Foul's Bane, The Illearth War, and The Power That Preserves.Certainly in the UK, "The Runes of the Earth: The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant" have been available in hardback for a few months now....

<A HREF="http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0575075996/ref%3Dnosim/authordatabase/202-6393853-3835824"><IMG SRC="http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51zTTZEmlhL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU02_.jpg" border=0 ALT="Amazon.co.uk"></a>

rooter
01-23-05, 07:17 PM
There is a disgusting lack of Dark Tower love in this thread... one of the best series of books of all time...

Eric F
01-23-05, 08:35 PM
Way to dig up a 4yr old thread!

rooter
01-23-05, 10:12 PM
done by a mod no less :P

pingie
01-26-05, 11:06 AM
I remember reading Memory Sorrow and Thorn back in high school. It was a good series as far as I can remember. And like everyone now, I'm into A Song of Ice and Fire as well. And about The Runelords by David Garland...I bought book 1 and 2 a while back but never pick them up to read...I guess since a few people here mentioned how good it is, I might just get the third book and read through all.

I'm really surprised that no one mentions anything about David Gemmell's books. His Drenai, Sipstrassi, and Rigante series are one of the best I've ever read in my humble opinion that is. =) Like a Song of Ice and Fire, you actually care for the characters in Gemmell's books. His books are definitely entertaining to say the least...

Shady12
01-26-05, 01:10 PM
I got done reading Legend by Gemmell a couple weeks ago and didn't like it at all. One problem is that I like for fantasy books to have a map of the world.. All these places were talked about in the book and it would have helped A LOT if I could have been able to picture where all these places were in relation to one another..would have made it MUCH more interesting. And I didn't care a bit about any of the characters although Druss and Rek ended up being kind of interesting. Just seemed like a short and uninteresting book.

Draven
01-26-05, 02:04 PM
I just finished Gemmell's "The Rigante" quadrilogy. I really enjoyed them.

I especially liked the "jump" in technology between the first two and last two books. And while "Wheel of Time" has gotten me used to dealing with the same characters for many, many books, Gemmell's (and Sara Douglass's "Wayfarer Redemption" series) deal with characters and their ancestors later on, which I didn't think I'd like because I'd grown attached to the original characters but I quickly changed my mind. It's cool reading about where the story goes hundreds of years later.

The other thing I liked is that Gemmell writes in a very entertaining way and is the master of hooking me so that I end up reading far longer than I planned. For example, he'll have two characters talking about setting up an ambush. Then the next chapter will be about another character. The chapter after that starts with someone running away from the ambush. And it's not until a little ways in that he'll even talk about the ambush. So I'm halfway through the chapter before I find out what exactly happened at the ambush and now we are on to another scenario I'm interested in.

It was a good series.

pingie
01-26-05, 02:13 PM
I got done reading Legend by Gemmell a couple weeks ago and didn't like it at all. One problem is that I like for fantasy books to have a map of the world.. All these places were talked about in the book and it would have helped A LOT if I could have been able to picture where all these places were in relation to one another..would have made it MUCH more interesting. And I didn't care a bit about any of the characters although Druss and Rek ended up being kind of interesting. Just seemed like a short and uninteresting book.

Yeah, I agree with you on all aspects that you mentioned on Legend. It was one of his earlier books, definitely not his best. I thought Legend was bland, but okay. He has gotten alot better since then. It sounds like you didn't enjoy it but if you thought it was okay, I would recommend that you give it another chance with some of his later books. IMO, Winter Warriors, Hero In The Shadows, Swords of Night And Day, Sword In The Storm, Ravenheart and the Sipstrassi tales are some of his better works. So if you have the time, give one of them a shot...

pingie
01-26-05, 02:29 PM
The other thing I liked is that Gemmell writes in a very entertaining way and is the master of hooking me so that I end up reading far longer than I planned. For example, he'll have two characters talking about setting up an ambush. Then the next chapter will be about another character. The chapter after that starts with someone running away from the ambush. And it's not until a little ways in that he'll even talk about the ambush. So I'm halfway through the chapter before I find out what exactly happened at the ambush and now we are on to another scenario I'm interested in.

Yeah, David Gemmell has a different approach to his writing. He can really get you hook with his story telling and especially his characters IMO. The characteristics of the characters are portrayed with a sense of realism...the confliction, the anger, the hate, the love and such are very well expressed in the writing...the characters are likable as well because of it all. At least I think so. His latter books are way better than his old ones.

Shady12
01-26-05, 03:35 PM
I may give some of his later stuff a try at some point. One thing I didn't like is how from sentence to sentence it would switch perspectives to the thoughts of another character..it would always take me a minute to realize it happened so I'd have to start reading the sentence/paragraph again.

Draven
01-26-05, 04:31 PM
I may give some of his later stuff a try at some point. One thing I didn't like is how from sentence to sentence it would switch perspectives to the thoughts of another character..it would always take me a minute to realize it happened so I'd have to start reading the sentence/paragraph again.

Yeah, that took a little getting used to. But I don't remember being confused by it. Maybe he got better at it later on :)

Shady12
01-26-05, 05:46 PM
Wouldn't say it confused me..but it made things not flow very well.

covenant
01-29-05, 07:57 PM
Certainly in the UK, "The Runes of the Earth: The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant" have been available in hardback for a few months now....

<A HREF="http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0575075996/ref%3Dnosim/authordatabase/202-6393853-3835824"><IMG SRC="http://www.ffbooks.co.uk/images/n15/n79701.jpg" border=0 ALT="Amazon.co.uk"></a>


I read the first couple of pages at BaM this afternoon. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw it on the shelf. Let's see.....30% off with an additional 10% off with a BaM card....it's a no-brainer.

Fok
01-31-05, 04:43 PM
I thought Stephen Kings Dark Tower series was pretty good.

gusamo
02-07-05, 07:12 PM
I have read all five of Steven Erikson's series Tale of the Malazan Book of the Fallen. This is the best series that I have read so far. It is huge and complex, with characters that keep you coming back for more. I have read A Song of Ice and Fire series and I have to say it runs second to Steven Erikson. Erikson also writes faster that Martin. The sixth installment of the series comes out around July.

If you read Erikson's work, don't give up on the story. The books are hard to understand, but well worth it in the end. There is a whole website devoted to his work, go to www.malazanempire.com

This series is great and the first 2 books are avalible in the US now, but all five can be gotten from the Amazon.ca in mass marketpaperback.

SiberianLlama
02-08-05, 02:36 AM
I have read all five of Steven Erikson's series Tale of the Malazan Book of the Fallen. This is the best series that I have read so far. It is huge and complex, with characters that keep you coming back for more. I have read A Song of Ice and Fire series and I have to say it runs second to Steven Erikson. Erikson also writes faster that Martin. The sixth installment of the series comes out around July.

If you read Erikson's work, don't give up on the story. The books are hard to understand, but well worth it in the end. There is a whole website devoted to his work, go to www.malazanempire.com

This series is great and the first 2 books are avalible in the US now, but all five can be gotten from the Amazon.ca in mass marketpaperback.

I've been hearing really good things about Erikson for a little while now. Has he given any indication on how many books his series will be?

Shady12
02-10-05, 07:46 PM
10 I believe and it looks like they are being pumped out at about 1 per year. I actually just finished the first book in the series today. Tough going for awhile because it's very complex and it doesn't waste space to explain the world and how things work so you have to figure it out gradually as you go. I hear it takes several books before you fully understand the what and why of everything. I wish it did explain everything because it would make it more enjoyable to know what was going on.

OCdiggs
10-03-07, 10:06 PM
I'm not in front of the books at the moment so name might be spelled incorrectly. Dennis McKiernan's books are always good reads, first trilogy might be a bit too LoTR for you, but you should get through it to get the basics down. The Novels he has written that are set in the same world are all quite good. DragonDoom may be my favorite, i'm a sucker for that ending.

GreenMonkey
10-04-07, 04:57 PM
I'm not in front of the books at the moment so name might be spelled incorrectly. Dennis McKiernan's books are always good reads, first trilogy might be a bit too LoTR for you, but you should get through it to get the basics down. The Novels he has written that are set in the same world are all quite good. DragonDoom may be my favorite, i'm a sucker for that ending.

You just revived a thread from 2005, dude

superdeluxe
03-26-08, 05:02 PM
You just revived a thread from 2005, dude


So what? Aren't we always getting on people because they do not use the search function. I mean he wasn't just bumping it for the sake of bumping

:)

Wolf359
03-26-08, 11:45 PM
So what? Aren't we always getting on people because they do not use the search function. I mean he wasn't just bumping it for the sake of bumping

:)


:lol:

Ozzy's Bat Head
03-27-08, 02:19 AM
I just love thread-revivals! I really tried to jump on the Erickson carpet ride and just love the first novel, then the 2nd came with the 'ascendants' concept and just killed it for me. Gave up mid way through book 3.

Honestly, in all my time reading, I've never had a flame out as fast as this series.

Gilgamesh1082
03-29-08, 07:17 AM
Different strokes then. I thought Memories of Ice was the finest novel I have ever read. Period. You really have to power through the first two books, but by the time you get halfway through Memories of Ice, the biggest payoff of any series ever starts happening. Seriously, I didn't appreciate just how good the first 3 books were until I was halfway through book 5, The Midnight Tides. Plus Tides introduces the greatest "married" couple in fantasy, Tehol Beddict and his "manservant," Bugg. Some of the funniest fantasy is written in those two characters.

And its sad. This thread reminds me that we still haven't gotten a new Fire and Ice novel yet from Martin. Gods, what a lazy bastard.

SiberianLlama
03-29-08, 08:46 AM
Ice and Fire.... ;)

starman9000
03-29-08, 09:10 AM
Ice and Fire.... ;)


I finally started book 2 of this. I loved the first, so hopefully it's more of the same. (it was a while in between readings, so I listened to it on tape a 2nd time as a refresher, there is just so much going on).

Does anyone know if there has been any more word on the HBO series?

SiberianLlama
03-29-08, 09:22 AM
According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Song_of_Ice_and_Fire#TV_adaptation),

Martin reported in August 2007 that the first draft of the script is complete[7] and stated in November that the script was approved and budgeting has begun. It should be noted, however, that the series has still not been officially greenlit, and the 2007 Writers Guild of America strike could have delayed the process

starman9000
03-29-08, 11:18 AM
Thanks, thats the last I had heard too, I was hoping the end of the strike may have helped push things along.

johnnysd
04-14-08, 09:40 PM
One series I would add to this thread is the new one by Patrick Rothfuss that starts with "The Name of the Wind." It is really quite excellent, and highly recommended.

Baron Of Hell
04-14-08, 11:33 PM
Weave World is epic. The book was split into four books but it might be sold a single book now.

MrE
04-15-08, 03:38 PM
I just discovered Paul Park's Roumania series: A Princess of Roumania, The Tourmaline, The White Tyger and a final book still to be published. Similar to Pullman but Park may be both a better fantasist and writer.

Baron Of Hell
04-15-08, 05:21 PM
On the same theme are any of the series mentioned complete? Or could people recommend any single books. I do love ice and fire but I'll be damn if I can remember any of the names or who went where in between books.

dugan
04-15-08, 10:37 PM
Weave World is epic. The book was split into four books but it might be sold a single book now.

Weaveworld is indeed epic.

But the split-into-four thing indicates that you're thinking of Imajica.

Baron Of Hell
04-16-08, 12:49 AM
Weaveworld is indeed epic.

But the split-into-four thing indicates that you're thinking of Imajica.

Indeed you are correct.

Axeramm
05-01-08, 01:15 AM
I really enjoy Jim Butcher's Codex Alera series. Read his Dresden Files books and saw that he had written a fantasy series. 4 books so far with a fifth due this fall i believe.

Walker Boh
05-01-08, 08:13 AM
Terry Brooks' Sword of Shannara seriesSeconded ... I'm a huge fan of the series, especially the four-part Scions of Shannara. It's the source of my username.

*edit* And I just realized I was replying to a post from 2001. Wow. At any rate, I got some good recommendations from a thread I hadn't seen before

eisenreich
05-01-08, 08:40 AM
Currently working through the Harrry Potter series (book 5) and as mentioned, the writing is surprisingly good.

Other suggestions that I've thorougly enjoyed throughout the years:

Tad Williams - Otherland series; perfect blend of Sci-Fi and Fantasy, four long books filled with some amazing characters, including one of my favorite villians of all time (Dread).
Philip Pullman - His Dark Materials trilogy; I think everyone's familiar, definitely warrants a read at some point

Tom Banjo
05-01-08, 09:00 AM
I agree with all the recommendations (from years ago) about Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn. Great series!
I tried to wade through Erikson's Gardens of the Moon, and gave up halfway. It was torture on my short attention span. But I'll try it again one day soon.
Has anyone read Salvatore's Corona series? I just started The Demon Awakens, and wondering if I'll like the series. I've liked all his other books, so I have high hopes.

starman9000
05-01-08, 09:19 AM
I just started The Demon Awakens, and wondering if I'll like the series. I've liked all his other books, so I have high hopes.


I started that one years ago and gave up about halfway through. I can't really remember why, but I just wasn't drawn in.

Lastblade
05-05-08, 01:09 PM
I tried to wade through Erikson's Gardens of the Moon, and gave up halfway. It was torture on my short attention span. But I'll try it again one day soon.


Book 2 is alot better, once you are more familiar with the whole and the (very large) cast of characters. I am on book 4 now (House of Chains) and it is fantastic. Very different feel from GRRM's ASOIAF and abit dense at times, but still one of the better fantasy series I have read.

Gilgamesh1082
05-06-08, 08:53 AM
Book 2 is alot better, once you are more familiar with the whole and the (very large) cast of characters. I am on book 4 now (House of Chains) and it is fantastic. Very different feel from GRRM's ASOIAF and abit dense at times, but still one of the better fantasy series I have read.

I'm waiting on the $160 limited edition Return of the Crimson Guard by Esselmont right now (side story that accompanies the Malazan Book of the Fallen) and patiently awaiting the release of the next book in the series proper, Toll the Hounds, in August. This series only gets better. Wait until book 5, Midnight Tides; it introduces the best couple in the series, Tehol Beddict and his manservant, Bugg. They steal every scene and book they appear in afterward.

In my opinion book 3, Memories of Ice, is the best book I've ever read and so far the best book in the series, although House of Chains came a close second for introducing Karsa Orlong.

benedict
05-07-08, 02:50 PM
I believe that Rob Holdstock's Merlin Codex sequence is complete, with all three now available in paperback.

http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/images/celtika.jpg (http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/nonfiction/celtika.htm) http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/images/irongrail.jpg (http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/nonfiction/irongrail.htm) http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/imageDB.cgi?isbn=9780765311092 (http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/biblio?isbn=0765311097)

I loved Gene Wolfe's first pair of "Soldier" books and consider that Holdstock's work has a similar feel in that he (kind of) puts fantasy in a "real" historical setting.

I have a treat coming up, having recently ordered Holdstock's The Broken Kings and Wolfe's Soldier of Sidon

arminius
05-07-08, 05:57 PM
I am reading Gemmells Troy series. They are quite good but more historic fiction than fantasy.

superdeluxe
05-30-10, 01:40 AM
Any new epic fantasy series that have popped up in the last 2 years that some should be looking for?

Sean O'Hara
05-30-10, 09:07 AM
Any new epic fantasy series that have popped up in the last 2 years that some should be looking for?

Ken Scholes' Psalms of Isaac series. I thought it incredibly weak (cultures are all alike, world building isn't thought through, flat characters), but a lot of people apparently like it.

Scott Lynch and Joe Abercrombie have been getting good buzz, but I haven't picked up any of his works yet.

And if you've been holding off on Malazan because you don't like unfinished series, the final book should be out this year. (Yeah, that's right, a series where each volume is longer than the books of A Song of Ice and Fire, yet Erikson's managed to finish the series in the period when Martin's only done one freakin' book.)

johnnysd
05-30-10, 01:15 PM
Ken Scholes' Psalms of Isaac series. I thought it incredibly weak (cultures are all alike, world building isn't thought through, flat characters), but a lot of people apparently like it.

Scott Lynch and Joe Abercrombie have been getting good buzz, but I haven't picked up any of his works yet.

And if you've been holding off on Malazan because you don't like unfinished series, the final book should be out this year. (Yeah, that's right, a series where each volume is longer than the books of A Song of Ice and Fire, yet Erikson's managed to finish the series in the period when Martin's only done one freakin' book.)

I have struggled a couple times through the first 100 pages of the first Malazan book. Does it pick up?

mgbfan
05-31-10, 04:45 PM
I did the same. Tried hard to read it, but came to the conclusion that if the author could give me nothing within almost half of a book, he wasn't worth sticking with. That said, a lot of people seemed to like it based on this board.

benedict
06-01-10, 03:56 AM
On the weekend I read a very favourable review in Interzone of "Shadow Prowler", the first volume of Alexey Pehov (http://www.alexeypehov.com/)'s Chronicles of Sialaof sequence.

I would augment/qualify online information by saying that the Interzone review indicates that the first volume is certainly not as derivative as a publisher's summary might sound i.e. Pehov is adjudged to be adept in his particular use of fantasy clichés and tropes.

Scroll down here (http://fantasyhotlist.blogspot.com/2010/01/excerpt-from-alexey-pehovs-shadow.html) for an excerpt.

Sean O'Hara
06-01-10, 11:12 AM
I have struggled a couple times through the first 100 pages of the first Malazan book. Does it pick up?

The first book is a bit of a slog, but once you get far enough in that you can actually understand what's going on, it's pretty good. You might try starting with the second book, Deadhouse Gates, which takes place in a totally different part of the world and is much better.

xmiyux
06-30-10, 06:22 AM
I have been enjoying the Codex Alera series by Jim Butcher. I am a total fiend for his Harry Dresden books (modern fantasy) but had never checked out his traditional high fantasy series. It does not disappoint. A somewhat unique world, take on magic, and enough political intrigue to be interesting.

Lastblade
06-30-10, 10:25 PM
Daniel Abraham's Long Price Quartet is pretty good too. Although, I have only read book 1 :)

Lastblade
06-30-10, 10:30 PM
I have struggled a couple times through the first 100 pages of the first Malazan book. Does it pick up?

Yes, but I can certainly understand if others don't find the first book interesting enough. If you are patient and like huge world, many fantastical races and a unique magic system, then you would really like it. The cast of characters do get a bit insane to keep track of (and I thought GRRM's ASOIAF was numerous).

Book 2 and 3 are really great.

johnnysd
07-18-10, 08:24 PM
Daniel Abraham's Long Price Quartet is pretty good too. Although, I have only read book 1 :)

I thought that it was quite good. Very low key and different. I look forward to his next series.

johnnysd
07-18-10, 08:27 PM
Any new epic fantasy series that have popped up in the last 2 years that some should be looking for?

I highly recommend the First Law series by Joe Abercrombie. Gritty, realistic with wonderfully deep characters. Highest recommendation.

MrE
07-19-10, 12:23 PM
I'm currently reading the historical fantasy "The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters" by Gordon Dahlquist and loving it. I know there's a second book, but not much more, since I don't want to get ahead of myself. Since it recent and underappreciated, used copies can also be found very inexpensively.

wmansir
09-09-10, 07:40 PM
I have been enjoying the Codex Alera series by Jim Butcher. I am a total fiend for his Harry Dresden books (modern fantasy) but had never checked out his traditional high fantasy series. It does not disappoint. A somewhat unique world, take on magic, and enough political intrigue to be interesting.

I'm halfway through the series myself and am really enjoying it. Like the Dresden series it's not the most mature or complex material, but it's great pulpy fun with some good twists on the genre.

Book one had the usually first book issues. The basic setup was quite well worn, but it kept the action going while revealing the interesting world of Alera. Book two really tested me. I almost abandoned the series as the first half was heavily bogged down in politics. I just finished book three and it was easily my favorite so far. That book just hit the ground running and didn't let up. I just a few chapters into book four and it seems to be keeping that pace.

mlemmond
09-11-10, 09:00 AM
I haven't seen this one mentioned but I always enjoyed it.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51AYGDSwXkL._SS500_.jpg

Gilgamesh1082
09-12-10, 04:34 PM
I have struggled a couple times through the first 100 pages of the first Malazan book. Does it pick up?

I won't lie, I sank two weeks into the first two books, and the majority of that was on GotM. As Sean has mentioned, you slog through it, and by the time the last 100-150 pages comes around, you're on an even keel finally. And then he throws you across a continent to an entirely different set of characters for book 2. GotM was the author's first published work and it shows. By the time Chain of Dogs came out, he had developed as a writer tremendously. The quality pick up between books 1 and 2 is simply astounding. And somehow he manages to best that going into book 3, Memories of Ice.

I was warned by others going into the series that Gardens is easily its greatest trying point. But the reward is so colossal. You owe it to yourself as a fantasy lover to make it past those first 700 pages.

johnnysd
09-12-10, 07:15 PM
I won't lie, I sank two weeks into the first two books, and the majority of that was on GotM. As Sean has mentioned, you slog through it, and by the time the last 100-150 pages comes around, you're on an even keel finally. And then he throws you across a continent to an entirely different set of characters for book 2. GotM was the author's first published work and it shows. By the time Chain of Dogs came out, he had developed as a writer tremendously. The quality pick up between books 1 and 2 is simply astounding. And somehow he manages to best that going into book 3, Memories of Ice.

I was warned by others going into the series that Gardens is easily its greatest trying point. But the reward is so colossal. You owe it to yourself as a fantasy lover to make it past those first 700 pages.

Yeah, I will try. For now though I have Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson (quite good so far) and then Towers of Midnight so it will be a whle before I can get to it.

SiberianLlama
09-20-10, 07:31 PM
Has anyone read The Night Watch (http://www.amazon.com/Night-Watch-Book/dp/1401359795/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1285028929&sr=1-1) by Sergei Lukyanenko? I've seen it a couple times at the book store and considered picking it up. It sounds cool and it's Russian fantasy so you know it must be dark and intense ;)

hanshotfirst1138
09-20-10, 08:23 PM
Hmm...why not try the greatest book(s) ever written: <b>THE LORD OF THE RINGS</b> !

Yeah, if you have any interest in High Fantasy and the genre, then whatever you may think of it, The Lord of the Rings is a watershed work that you should read. I'd say take a look at Richard Adams' Watership Down in many ways one of the best successors to Tolkien. If you want to got back to the roots of the genre, check out Robert E. Howard's original pulp stories about Conan the Barbarian, Bran Mak Morn, and Kull. Or for a bit of revisionism, look to Michael Moorcock's Elric stories. If you're looking that doesn't involve good vs. evil and has a more contemporary flavor, Neil Gaiman's Sandman graphic novel series is a fascinating and intriguing, if highly complex and difficult piece of work.

GreenMonkey
09-21-10, 03:05 AM
I've been reading Elizabeth Haydon's Rhapsody/Prophecy/Destiny books. She was a newbie author. I enjoyed the first book, Rhapsody, a lot...although it got a little tedious with a section in the middle.

I'm not sure where I stand on them yet -they seem entertaining, but I can't recommend yet. I either need to finish the ones she has written (waiting for book 3 to show up in the mail) or re-read the series before I'm certain.

Laughoutloud
09-28-10, 02:50 PM
I love books by Karen Miller (K.E. Mills) and Terry Brooks. Both have great fantasy based stories that keep you glued to the books.

Clandestine
12-04-10, 10:41 PM
I agree with you about Martin, but fortunately I have discovered another writer that creates worlds with the same "take no prisoners" attitude. His name is Walter Rhein, and his book The Bone Sword is a must read!

To a lesser extent, I'd recommend Lawrence Watt Evans and his Ethshar series.

Thanks for the other recommendations from the people on this forum!

benedict
12-06-10, 09:34 AM
I believe that Rob Holdstock's Merlin Codex sequence is complete, with all three now available in paperback.

http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/images/celtika.jpg (http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/nonfiction/celtika.htm) http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/images/irongrail.jpg (http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/nonfiction/irongrail.htm) http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/imageDB.cgi?isbn=9780765311092 (http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/biblio?isbn=0765311097)

I loved Gene Wolfe's first pair of "Soldier" books and consider that Holdstock's work has a similar feel in that he (kind of) puts fantasy in a "real" historical setting.

I have a treat coming up, having recently ordered Holdstock's The Broken Kings and Wolfe's Soldier of SidonJust finishing this off again and would emphasise my original recommendation. Holdstock's Mythago Wood is another excellent, non-standard fantasy to which he added a number of related volumes over the years; culminating quite recently with Avilion (http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/fiction/article6716358.ece) which I'm putting on a wishlist.

Sadly, Holdstock died at the end of last year aged just 61 of organ failure brought on by an e-coli infection. From the memorial pages (http://news.ansible.co.uk/a270supp.html) he was hugely popular fellow in addition to being a highly regarded voice in the fantasy field.

mgbfan
12-11-10, 04:15 PM
Maybe a little early for this recommendation as a series, but Patrick Rothfuss's Name of the Wind is fantastic. Best new fantasy I've read since GRR Martin. Second book out in April.

Sessa17
12-11-10, 07:31 PM
Maybe a little early for this recommendation as a series, but Patrick Rothfuss's Name of the Wind is fantastic. Best new fantasy I've read since GRR Martin. Second book out in April.

I've talked about it many times here, but there doesn't seem to be much interest in it. I think Sanderson's new Stormlight series has a better first book, but Rothfuss's book is phenomenal. The only thing that keeps it from being perfect, is it woefully goes way off course with with something in the last quarter of the book.

xmiyux
12-11-10, 08:40 PM
Maybe a little early for this recommendation as a series, but Patrick Rothfuss's Name of the Wind is fantastic. Best new fantasy I've read since GRR Martin. Second book out in April.

Based on the two recommendations I will check it out. Good fantasy is hard to come by.

mgbfan
12-12-10, 12:27 AM
I've talked about it many times here, but there doesn't seem to be much interest in it. I think Sanderson's new Stormlight series has a better first book, but Rothfuss's book is phenomenal. The only thing that keeps it from being perfect, is it woefully goes way off course with with something in the last quarter of the book.

Agreed. There's one strange little detour that didn't make a lot of sense--I'm sure we're talking about the same thing. Although maybe it will fall into place later down the line.